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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
14-Jun-2012

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Contact: Dr. Richard Berndt
berndt@physik.uni-kiel.de
49-431-880-3946
Kiel University

Switchable nano magnets

Research group at Kiel University switches magnetism of individual molecules

This release is available in German.

Using individual molecules instead of electronic or magnetic memory cells would revolutionise data storage technology, as molecular memories could be thousand-fold smaller. Scientists of Kiel University took a big step towards developing such molecular data storage. They succeeded in selectively switching on and off the magnetism of individual molecules, so-called spin-crossover complexes, by electrons. The interdisciplinary study is part of the Collaborative Research Centre 677 "Functions by Switching", which is funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). The results prove that it is technically possible to store information using molecules. The study will be published on June 25th in the German science magazine Angewandte Chemie (Applied Chemistry).

"In principle information may be stored in a single molecule. However, techniques that would make such an approach feasible are becoming available just now", explains project leader Professor Richard Berndt of the Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics at Kiel University. Since the 1980s scientists are able to image individual molecules on surfaces with scanning tunnelling microscopes, he continues. Current research aims at controlling the characteristics of single molecules in order to facilitate future technical applications. The Collaborative Research Centre 677 "Functions by Switching" at Kiel University is a large-scale project engaged in such investigations, which aim at constructing molecular machines.

The current study is focused on the magnetism of molecules. Using a scanning tunnelling microscope Dr. Thiruvancheril Gopakumar, who carried out the study, was able to switch individual molecules between two magnetic states. Despite their dense packing in a molecular layer he was able to target individual molecules for switching. "Many research groups are striving to control the magnetic characteristics of molecules. Gopakumar's studies have taken us one step ahead", says Berndt.

The molecules (spin-crossover complexes) were synthesised at the Institute of Inorganic Chemistry at Kiel University. "Even though it took us a long time to find adequate molecules, we are very pleased with the outcome", states Professor Felix Tuczek, head of the research group "Inorganic Molecular Chemistry". The next step will be to adapt the molecules in a way that would allow scientists to switch them with light instead of electrons and at higher temperatures.

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Original publication: Gopakumar, TG, Matino, F, Naggert, H, Bannwarth, A, Tuczek, F, Berndt R (2012): Electron-induced spin crossover of single molecules in a bilayer on gold, DOI: 10.1002/anie.201201203 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ange.201201203/pdf

Further information about CRC 677: www.sfb677.uni-kiel.de

The following pictures are available for download: www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2012/2012-169-1.jpg
Caption: Computer graphic of the spin-crossover molecule that was used for the experiments on gold surface and the STM images of its different magnetic states
Picure & copyright: Holger Naggert & Thiruvancheril Gopakumar

www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2012/2012-169-2.jpg
Caption: Physicist Gopakumar is working with switchable molecules at the scanning tunnelling microscope.
Photo & copyright: Jürgen Haacks/CAU

www.uni-kiel.de/download/pm/2012/2012-169-3.jpg
Caption: The hard disk of the future might be able to store data in individual nano-magnets.
Photo & copyright: Jürgen Haacks/CAU

Contact:
Prof. Dr. Richard Berndt
Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik
phone: +49 (431) 880-3946
e-mail: berndt@physik.uni-kiel.de



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