[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 9-Aug-2012
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Contact: Janet Wilson
janethw@uci.edu
949-824-3969
University of California - Irvine

Wastewater key to quenching global thirst, UCI-led review finds

Conservation also vital to supply both humans, ecosystems

Irvine, Calif. Parched cities and regions across the globe are using sewage effluent and other wastewater in creative ways to augment drinking water, but 4 billion people still do not have adequate supplies, and that number will rise in coming decades. Wildlife, rivers and ecosystems are also being decimated by the ceaseless quest for new water and disposal of waste. Changing human behavior and redoubling use of alternatives are critical to breaking that cycle.

Those are the conclusions of a sweeping review entitled "Taking the 'waste' out of wastewater for human water security and ecosystem sustainability" in a special Aug. 10 issue of the journal Science.

"This is the only path forward to provide water for humans as well as for ecosystems," said lead author Stanley Grant, a UC Irvine civil & environmental engineering professor who specializes in water quality. "We need to focus on improving the productivity and value of existing supplies, which basically means getting more out of a glass of water."

From Fountain Valley, Calif., and Melbourne, Australia, to Israel and Brazil, the researchers found that homeowners and major utilities are capturing liquid sewage, highway runoff, household laundry water and rainfall. In some cases, alternative sources are a major contributor to replenishing pristine water. Elsewhere they are a drop in the bucket.

The paper describes three emerging methods of addressing shortages: substituting high-quality water with lower-quality water where appropriate, creating drinking water from wastewater, and reducing leaks and the volume needed for basic services. Key examples:

In addition to new methods, transforming policies and attitudes is important. Historically, governments have built dams, lengthy water lines and other infrastructure. Recently, New York City officials considered building an $8 billion treatment plant when farming and housing developments threatened reservoir quality. But instead, they spent $1 billion buying land and restoring habitat as a buffer against the polluters.

Altering individual habits could be tougher. Turfgrass still consumes nearly three-quarters of residential drinking water in arid areas of the southwestern U.S. Homeowners may eventually have no choice but to replace lawns with drought-friendly landscapes. Engineered wetlands and other "biofilters" that capture storm water runoff are also part of the solution.

"These complementary options make the most of scarce freshwater resources, serve the varying water needs of both developed and developing countries, and confer a variety of environmental benefits," the researchers conclude. "Their widespread adoption will require changing how freshwater is sourced, used, managed and priced."

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Co-authors are Jean-Daniel Saphores, Brett Sanders, Sunny Jiang, Diego Rosso, William Cooper and David Feldman of UCI; Michael Stewardson, Ivan Marusic, Andrew Hamilton and Tim Fletcher of Australia's University of Melbourne; Lisa Levin at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, Calif.; Richard Ambrose at UCLA; and Ana Deletic, Rebekah Brown and Perran Cook at Monash University in Victoria, Australia.

About the University of California, Irvine: Founded in 1965, UCI is a top-ranked university dedicated to research, scholarship and community service. Led by Chancellor Michael Drake since 2005, UCI is among the most dynamic campuses in the University of California system, with nearly 28,000 undergraduate and graduate students, 1,100 faculty and 9,000 staff. Orange County's second-largest employer, UCI contributes an annual economic impact of $4 billion. For more UCI news, visit www.today.uci.edu.

News Radio: UCI maintains on campus an ISDN line for conducting interviews with its faculty and experts. Use of this line is available for a fee to radio news programs/stations that wish to interview UCI faculty and experts. Use of the ISDN line is subject to availability and approval by the university.

UCI maintains an online directory of faculty available as experts to the media. To access, visit www.today.uci.edu/experts. For UCI breaking news, visit www.zotwire.uci.edu.



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