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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
5-Sep-2012

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Contact: Yael Franco
yfranco@plos.org
415-568-3169
PLOS

Fathers who sleep closer to children have lower testosterone levels

A PLOS ONE press release

Closer sleeping proximity between fathers and children is associated with a greater decrease in the father's testosterone level, with possible implications for parenting behavior. The full report is published Sep. 5 in the open access journal PLOS ONE.

Fathers' testosterone levels have been associated with parenting behavior and involvement across species, with higher levels generally associated with lower parental involvement. The authors of the current study, led by Lee Gettler of the University of Notre Dame, studied 362 fathers in the Philippines to determine whether their sleeping arrangements - either sleeping on the same surface as their children, in the same room, or separately - were related to their testosterone levels. The researchers found that close sleep proximity between fathers and their children was associated with greater decreases in testosterone level as the men transitioned to fatherhood, as well as lower overall levels relative to fathers that slept apart from their children.

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Citation: Gettler LT, McKenna JJ, McDade TW, Agustin SS, Kuzawa CW (2012) Does Cosleeping Contribute to Lower Testosterone Levels in Fathers? Evidence from the Philippines. PLOS ONE 7(9): e41559. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0041559

Financial Disclosure: This work was supported by Wenner Gren Foundation (Gr. 7356; Gr. 8186), National Science Foundation (BCS-0542182; BCS-0962212), The Interdisciplinary Obesity Center (RR20649), and The Center for Environmental Health and Susceptibility (ES10126; project 7-2004-E). LTG was supported by a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship during write-up. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Competing Interest Statement: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

PLEASE LINK TO THE SCIENTIFIC ARTICLE IN ONLINE VERSIONS OF YOUR REPORT (URL goes live after the embargo ends): http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0041559

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