[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 5-Oct-2012
[ | E-mail Share Share ]

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
301-286-4044
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA notes Nadine now no more

IMAGE: TRMM data on Oct. 3 at 10:49 p.m. EDT showed that Nadine was producing light to moderate rainfall (blue/green) in an area well east of the center of circulation, while...

Click here for more information.

Twenty-three days after Nadine was born, the tropical cyclone's life came to an end in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean. NASA's TRMM satellite caught a look at the fading Nadine one final time on Oct. 3 before it dissipated.

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite passed above long-lasting Nadine for the last time before the tropical storm's dissipation on October 4, 2012 at 0249 UTC (10:49 p.m. EDT October 3, 2012).

TRMM measures rainfall from space and there was very little remaining in Nadine when it passed overhead. Rainfall data from TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) showed that Nadine was producing light to moderate rainfall in an area well east of the center of circulation, while the center was rain-free.

TRMM data showed that the approaching cold front that would help bring about Nadine's demise was generating rainfall west of Nadine's center.

According to NOAA Hurricane Ginger lasted 28 days in the Atlantic Ocean in 1971. In the Pacific Ocean Hurricane John, renamed Typhoon John when it crossed the International Dateline holds the record with a 31 day lifetime during August and September 1994. Although not the longest-lived tropical cyclone, Nadine is in the top 50 longest-lasting tropical cyclones in either ocean basin.

###



[ Back to EurekAlert! ] [ | E-mail Share Share ]

 


AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.