[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 9-Nov-2012
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Contact: Christine Westendorf
christinewestendorf@acaai.org
847-427-1200
American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology

Central and southern living might turn you vegetarian

Lone star tick causes alpha-gal meat sensitivity, 32 percent higher in regional population

ANAHEIM, CA. (November 9, 2012) Meat lovers living in the central and southern regions of the country might be opting for a vegetarian lifestyle if meat comes with an unwanted side of a life-threatening allergic reaction. According to a study presented at the Annual Scientific Meeting of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), the lone star tick inhabiting these regions is the primary reason for what's known as a meat induced alpha-gal allergic reaction.

Alpha-gal is a sugar carbohydrate found in red meats such as beef, pork and lamb. According to the study, positive alpha-gal rates are 32 percent higher in lone star tick population areas as compared to other regions. The central and southern regions of the United States have the highest rates of alpha-gal sensitization due to the lone star tick.

"Blood levels of antibodies for alpha-gal in the human body can rise after a single bite from the lone-star tick," said allergist Stanley Fineman, M.D., ACAAI president. "This can result in allergic symptoms which are usually delayed after meat ingestion and may present as mild hives but may also be a severe, potentially deadly reaction known as anaphylaxis."

The study also found positive rates higher than expected in the north-central and west regions of the country, where the lone star tick is not found.

"These findings suggest that other species of ticks, or possibly human factors, may play a role in allergic reactions to alpha-gal," said Dr. Fineman. "Patients with delayed allergic reactions after eating meats should see an allergist to determine if it is an alpha-gal allergy. The best treatment is strict avoidance of meat. An allergist may also prescribe epinephrine in the event of a life threatening emergency."

Unlike other food allergies, alpha-gal meat allergy can be delayed as long as three to six hours after eating meat. Symptoms range from mild to severe and may include:

If you experience an allergic reaction after eating meat, seek emergency medical attention. Follow up with a board-certified allergist who can develop a treatment plan for you and prescribe life-saving epinephrine.

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Information about allergies and asthma can be found at AllergyAndAsthmaRelief.org. To see if lone star ticks populate your region, visit The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention distribution map at http://1.usa.gov/PEsBDM. More news and research from the annual meeting, being held Nov. 8-13, 2012 can be followed via Twitter at #ACAAI.

About ACAAI

The ACAAI is a professional medical organization of more than 5,700 allergists-immunologists and allied health professionals, headquartered in Arlington Heights, Ill. The College fosters a culture of collaboration and congeniality in which its members work together and with others toward the common goals of patient care, education, advocacy and research. ACAAI allergists are board-certified physicians trained to diagnose allergies and asthma, administer immunotherapy, and provide patients with the best treatment outcomes. For more information and to find relief, visit www.AllergyandAsthmaRelief.org. Join us on Facebook and Twitter.

The ACAAI Press Room is located in Room 304B at the Anaheim Convention Center, Nov. 9-12, 2012. To arrange an interview, please contact Christine Westendorf, ACAAI Media Relations Manager, at 847-427-1200 or ChristineWestendorf@acaai.org



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