[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 7-Dec-2012
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Contact: Jennifer Martin
jmartin@nifa.usda.gov
202-720-8188
United States Department of Agriculture - Research, Education and Economics

USDA, USAID collaborate to improve productivity of the common bean

Work will also strengthen global food security

WASHINGTON, Dec. 7, 2012 The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) today awarded five grants totaling $4.5 million in support of research to improve the production of the common bean, a main staple produced throughout food insecure areas of the world, including East and Southern Africa. The awards were made by USDA's National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) in coordination with the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). USAID provided the funds for the grants.

"Over the next 50 years, we will need to produce roughly as much food for the world's population as has been produced in the entire history of mankind," said Catherine Woteki, USDA's Chief Scientist and Under Secretary for Research, Education and Economics. "A challenge this serious and urgent requires the best and brightest ideas in food and agricultural science. The projects awarded today have the potential to unlock those ideas and improve the production of one of the world's most vital food crops."

The funded projects will work to address challenges to common bean production faced by smallholder producers. The program is part of the government-wide Feed the Future Initiative, President Obama's whole-of-government global hunger and food security initiative which supports country-driven approaches to address the root causes of hunger and poverty and forge long-term solutions to chronic food insecurity and under-nutrition. The partnership is also part of the USAID-USDA Norman Borlaug Commemorative Research Initiative, which addresses food security needs by linking U.S. research and scientific innovations to effective adaptations in the fields across developing countries.

"This new research will help us solve critical production and disease constraints in common bean, the most important grain legume in human diets," said Julie Howard, Chief Scientist with USAID's Bureau for Food Security. "Because common bean is the primary staple crop for over 200 million Africans and cultivated mostly by women, the potential impact of more productive, disease-resistant varieties on household nutrition and incomes in our Feed the Future countries is substantial. We are pleased to support this collaborative approach to tackling some of the most challenging problems affecting legume productivity, one of Feed the Future's primary research themes."

The five projects awarded today will provide research for two core focus areas:

Funding in fiscal year 2012 was awarded to the following institutions:

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USDA encouraged project leaders to make connections with ongoing and relevant projects such as the Common Bean Coordinated Agricultural Project and USAID's Dry Grain Pulses CRSP. USDA also encouraged applicants to develop projects that develop content and programs suitable for delivery through existing Extension programs, such as the eXtension Plant Breeding and Genomics Community of Practice and the Legume Pest Information Platform for Extension and Education.

As the world's largest agricultural research institute, USDA is focused on reducing global hunger by increasing global cooperation and collaboration on research strategies and their implementation. For example, through Feed the Future, USDA and USAID are coordinating their research portfolio with ongoing work of other donors, multilateral institutions and government and non-government entities at the country level to effectively improve agricultural productivity, reduce food insecurity and generate economic opportunity. Under Feed the Future, research investments in global food security have more than doubled. Previous research has focused on wheat rust; aflatoxin, a toxic fungus that infects many crops and causes illness; developing a vaccine for East Coast fever, a major killer of cattle in east Africa; and supporting enhanced livestock and grain legumes production.

USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. To file a complaint of discrimination, write to USDA, Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Stop 9410, Washington, DC 20250-9410, or call toll-free at (866) 632-9992 (English) or (800) 877-8339 (TDD) or (866) 377-8642 (English Federal-relay) or (800) 845-6136 (Spanish Federal-relay).



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