[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 16-Feb-2013
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Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Mussel-inspired 'glue' for surgical repair and cancer drug delivery

Mimic of key mussel adhesive protein is harnessed for biomedical applications

When it comes to sticking power under wet conditions, marine mussels are hard to beat. They can adhere to virtually all inorganic and organic surfaces, sustaining their tenacious bonds in saltwater, including turbulent tidal environments.

Northwestern University's Phillip B. Messersmith will discuss his research in a talk titled "Mussel-Inspired Materials for Surgical Repair and Drug Delivery" at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) annual meeting in Boston. His presentation is part of the symposium "Translation of Mussel Adhesion to Beneficial New Concepts and Materials" to be held from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 16.

Messersmith also will participate in a news briefing, titled "Mussel-Bound Adhesion," to be held at noon the same day.

He has created new materials that mimic mussel adhesive proteins for three medical applications: sealants for fetal membrane repair, self-setting antibacterial hydrogels, and polymers for cancer drug delivery and thermal destruction of cancer cells.

"Mussel adhesion is a remarkable process involving secretion of liquid protein glue that hardens rapidly into a solid, water-resistant adhesive," Messersmith said. "Several aspects of this process inspire our development of synthetic materials for practical applications. An unusually compelling opportunity for translation of mussel-adhesion concepts is in the repair or reconstruction of tissues in the human body, where water is ubiquitous and its presence represents a challenge for achieving desired outcomes."

Messersmith is a professor of biomedical engineering at Northwestern's McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science.

The foot of the common mussel (Mytilus edulis) produces a sticky glue for adhering to rocks and other objects. Key to its adhesiveness is a family of unique proteins called mussel adhesive proteins, which contain a high concentration of the catecholic amino acid DOPA (dihydroxyphenylalanine).

All of Messersmith's biomedical materials contain a synthetic form of DOPA. (He first developed a simple synthetic polymer containing DOPA in 2002.) In his AAAS talk, Messersmith will detail these three medical applications of his materials:

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Symposium information:

"Translation of Mussel Adhesion to Beneficial New Concepts and Materials"
8:30-11:30 a.m. Saturday, February 16
Room 306 (Hynes Convention Center)

News briefing information:

"Mussel-Bound Adhesion"
Noon Saturday, February 16
Room 103 (Hynes Convention Center)



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