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Contact: Ellen Acconcia
eacconcia@sirweb.org
703-460-5582
Society of Interventional Radiology

Society of Interventional Radiology: 38th Annual Scientific Meeting

How prostate, pain, fat, tumors and legs benefit from minimally invasive treatments, showcased April 13-18 in New Orleans

FAIRFAX, Va.—From miniature ice balls that can zap pain and lung tumors to an image-guided, minimally invasive method to shrink the prostate, physicians will present the latest research on cutting-edge treatments at the Society of Interventional Radiology's 38th Annual Scientific Meeting April 13󈝾 at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center in New Orleans. The meeting is centered on the theme "IR Reaching Out" and delivers education, resources and outcome-based evidence to attendees from a broad range of diverse clinical interests and practice settings.

Listed below are several examples of research being presented at SIR 2013, illustrating why the meeting attracts a diverse group of experts, including community or university-based physicians, physician assistants and nurse practitioners, radiology assistants, nurses, technologists as well as hospital administrators and industry partners.

For Men
Nonsurgical treatment shrinks enlarged prostate
Men who suffer from enlarged prostates—prompting frequent nighttime trips to the bathroom— may have a minimally invasive option to shrink the gland. According to early reports from the first prospective U.S. study, prostatic artery embolization (PAE) reduces blood flow to the prostate, shrinking it and significantly reducing symptoms.
Medical illustrations are available.

Body Reshaping
Sculpting beautiful bodies … with lasers
Fat-melting lasers are not only safe and effective, they could replace the surgical "tummy tuck," suggests research on more than 2,000 women and men. The safe new treatment melts fat, which is then suctioned out of the body.

Freezing Treatment
Freezing out pain Chronic pain can be helped by freezing damaged nerves, suggests a study of a minimally invasive treatment called cryoneurolysis. The treatment could provide relief to the more than 15 million Americans who suffer from chronic nerve pain. Medical images are available.

Ice therapy zaps lung tumors
Minimally invasive cryoablation freezes and kills cancerous tumors that have spread to the lungs, extending survival, according to results of the treatment's first multicenter trial.
Medical images are available.

Difficult Tumors
Treating resistant tumors with electrical pulses
A minimally invasive electrical pulse treatment, irreversible electroporation (IRE), attacks tumors yet doesn't hurt healthy nearby tissue, according to preliminary research.
Medical images available.

Preventing Amputation
Drug-coated stents can save legs
Stents coated with anti-clotting medicine can open blocked leg arteries, relieving pain and preventing amputation in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD), suggests a new study.
Medical images are available.

For Dialysis Patients
Stenting dramatically improves treatment access for dialysis patients
SIR's Abstract of the Year suggests that kidney patients who are on dialysis may be helped by minimally invasive treatment with stents, which can keep their treatment access sites open longer than balloon angioplasty.
Medical images are available.

Repairing Dangerous Bowel Blockages
Stenting blocked bowel arteries saves lives
Reopening blocked bowel arteries with stents can alleviate severe pain, weight loss and death, suggests new research. The minimally invasive treatment can help people avoid surgery.
Medical images are available.

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For more information about the Society of Interventional Radiology and its 38th Annual Scientific Meeting, visit online at http://www.SIRweb.org or http://www.SIRmeeting.org.

About the Society of Interventional Radiology

Interventional radiologists are physicians who specialize in minimally invasive, targeted treatments. They offer the most in-depth knowledge of the least invasive treatments available coupled with diagnostic and clinical experience across all specialties. They use X-ray, MRI and other imaging to advance a catheter in the body, such as in an artery, to treat at the source of the disease internally. As the inventors of angioplasty and the catheter-delivered stent, which were first used in the legs to treat peripheral arterial disease, interventional radiologists pioneered minimally invasive modern medicine. Today, interventional oncology is a growing specialty area of interventional radiology. Interventional radiologists can deliver treatments for cancer directly to the tumor without significant side effects or damage to nearby normal tissue.
Many conditions that once required surgery can be treated less invasively by interventional radiologists. Interventional radiology treatments offer less risk, less pain and less recovery time compared to open surgery. Visit http://www.SIRweb.org.
The Society of Interventional Radiology is holding its 38th Annual Scientific Meeting April 13󈝾 at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center in New Orleans. The theme of the meeting is "IR Reaching Out," chosen to reflect the many ways the Annual Scientific Meeting provides valuable education to attendees across a broad range of diverse clinical interests and practice settings.



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