[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 3-May-2013
[ | E-mail Share Share ]

Contact: Zoe Dunford
zoe.dunford@nbi.ac.uk
07-768-164-185
Norwich BioScience Institutes

Royal Society elects 2 new Fellows from the John Innes Centre

5 Fellows now at JIC

Two scientists from the John Innes Centre have been elected as Fellows of the Royal Society, the premier scientific accolade in the UK. Their breakthroughs in fundamental research have pioneered advances in antibiotic discovery and in crop improvement from which we all benefit.

Professor Mike Bevan pioneered methods for expressing foreign genes in plants that underpin the crop biotechnology industry. He instigated plant genome sequence analyses and has recently completed the first draft of the wheat genome. This work will accelerate breeding and genetic analysis of this globally important crop.

Professor Mervyn Bibb's research focus is on how soil bacteria such as Streptomyces make antibiotics. Nearly 80% of clinically used antibiotics are derived from these microorganisms. His breakthroughs assist drug companies in their quest to make new and improved antibiotics. A spin-out company based on his work has an antibiotic about to enter phase 2 clinical trials.

"Professors Bevan and Bibb have been key players in the development of JIC's research in molecular aspects of plant and microbial biology" said Professor Dale Sanders, director of the John Innes Centre.

"Although their research fields are seemingly disparate, Mike and Merv have both demonstrated the power that genetics can bring to a fundamental understanding of life."

"This research will set the stage for genetically-based translational advances that address national and global issues in the areas of food security and human health."

The Fellowship is the backbone of the Royal Society, made up of the most eminent scientists, engineers and technologists from the UK and the Commonwealth. Fellows are elected through a peer review process on the basis of excellence in science that culminates in a vote by existing Fellows.

Both newly elected JIC scientists have active research groups with long-term research plans to improve understanding in their field.

"I want to understand how plant growth is controlled and I am analysing the wheat genome to understand how hybridization influences gene stability and expression," said Professor Bevan.

Insights from this work will provide new ways to increase crop yields and breed new crops.

Professor Bibb is working on as-yet clinically unexploited antibiotics made by Streptomyces and their close relatives. He is exploring ways to engineer the bacteria to produce new and improved variants. Their ability to withstand emerging antibiotic resistance will be crucial.

"Election as a Fellow of the Royal Society would not have happened if it were not for the hard work and intellectual input of a large number of students, post-docs and visiting workers," said Professor Bibb.

"For both Mike and me, our achievements are based on the efforts of our respective research groups and we each have many people to thank for this recognition."

Sir Paul Nurse, President of the Royal Society, said:

"Science helps us to better understand ourselves and the natural world around us and has a huge role to play in future economic prosperity and the health of our planet and its 7 billion people. In the coming decades we are going to find ourselves more and more dependent on the solutions. Science can offer to grand challenges such as food shortages, climate change and tackling disease. These scientists who have been elected to the Fellowship of the Royal Society have already contributed much to the scientific endeavour following in the footsteps of pioneers such as Newton, Darwin and Einstein and it gives me great pleasure to welcome them into our ranks."

###

Contact

Photos of the scientists and images representing their research area are available. Please contact Zoe Dunford at the JIC press office: +44 (0)1603 255111, 07768 164185, zoe.dunford@jic.ac.uk

Notes to editors

About the John Innes Centre

The John Innes Centre, http://www.jic.ac.uk, is a world-leading research centre based on the Norwich Research Park http://www.nrp.org.uk. The JIC's mission is to generate knowledge of plants and microbes through innovative research, to train scientists for the future, and to apply its knowledge to benefit agriculture, human health and well-being, and the environment. JIC delivers world class bioscience outcomes leading to wealth and job creation, and generating high returns for the UK economy. JIC http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/ is one of eight institutes that receive strategic funding from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council.

About BBSRC

BBSRC invests in world-class bioscience research and training on behalf of the UK public. Our aim is to further scientific knowledge, to promote economic growth, wealth and job creation and to improve quality of life in the UK and beyond.

Funded by the UK Government, and with an annual budget of around 445M, we support research and training in universities and strategically funded institutes. BBSRC research and the people we fund are helping society to meet major challenges, including food security, green energy and healthier, longer lives. Our investments underpin important UK economic sectors, such as farming, food, industrial biotechnology and pharmaceuticals.

For more information about BBSRC, our science and our impact see: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk

For more information about BBSRC strategically funded institutes see: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/institutes



[ Back to EurekAlert! ] [ | E-mail Share Share ]

 


AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.