[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 18-Jun-2013
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Contact: Mike Ferrari
mike.ferrari@uhhospitals.org
216-844-7239
University Hospitals Case Medical Center

UH Case Medical Center launches novel clinical trial using stem cells to prevent amputation

Investigational device could prevent or delay major amputation in patients with Critical Limb Ischemia (CLI) due to severe peripheral arterial disease (PAD)

University Hospitals Case Medical Center clinical researchers have launched an innovative clinical trial, unique in its design, which will evaluate the ability of a patient's own stem cells to prevent leg amputations in end stage peripheral arterial disease (PAD).

Led by Vik Kashyap, MD, Division Chief, Vascular Surgery at University Hospitals Case Medical Center's Harrington Heart & Vascular Institute and Professor of Surgery at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, the clinical trial is designed to improve blood flow in legs with blocked arteries by attempting to treat diseased blood vessels. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a common yet serious disease that occurs when extra cholesterol and fat circulating in the blood collects on the walls of the arteries that supply blood to the limbs.

Due to the location and extent of the blockages in certain individuals, standard treatments such as surgical bypass (insertion of a vein or synthetic graft to redirect blood flow around the blockage) and angioplasty (insertion of a balloon through the artery to open the blockage) will not improve blood flow to the leg, and amputation is the only alternative.

For patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI) revascularization procedures such as surgical bypass or percutaneous angioplasty/stenting are currently the only option to restore perfusion and maintain limb viability.

For CLI patients who are non-candidates for revascularization, amputation is often needed. It is estimated that over 160,000 amputations are performed in the United States each year.

The number of CLI patients who will not be candidates for revascularization continues to rise as the population ages and the incidence of diabetes and other vascular risk factors increase. For CLI patients who are considered unreconstructable, the amputation and mortality rates at six months approach 40% and 20%, respectively. Furthermore, nearly 30% of patients who undergo below-knee amputation will fail rehabilitation and require chronic institutional care or professional assistance at home.

The trial sponsor, Biomet Biologics (Warsaw, IN), recently completed a Phase I study of 30 subjects to evaluate the safety of autologous concentrated bone marrow aspirate for critical limb ischemia. The results of this study were used to advance the company's MarrowStim™ concentration technology into the FDA-approved, pivotal IDE trial described here. Overall, the trial will enroll 152 subjects at up to 20 investigational sites.

"This trial offers an opportunity to save a patient's leg when there are no remaining options to improve blood supply," said Dr. Kashyap. "We are pleased to add this capability at UH and provide hope for patients facing the risk of limb loss."

Subjects will be randomized to receive either the investigational treatment involving the MarrowStim™ P.A.D. Kit (75% chance), or a placebo control involving a sham procedure (25% chance). The trial's primary end point of time to treatment failure, defined as major amputation or death, will be evaluated over a one‐year follow‐up period. Secondary end points, including rest pain, perfusion measurements, quality of life, and safety, will also be evaluated for one year.

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Only those patients meeting the pre-defined approved inclusion/exclusion criteria are eligible for this clinical trial. To learn more about this clinical trial and to see the qualifications for participation, visit http://www.clinicaltrialspotlight.com or call toll-free at 877-788-3972.

About University Hospitals

University Hospitals serves the needs of patients through an integrated network of hospitals, outpatient centers and primary care physicians. At the core of our health system is University Hospitals Case Medical Center. The primary affiliate of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center is home to some of the most prestigious clinical and research centers of excellence in the nation and the world, including cancer, pediatrics, women's health, orthopedics and spine, radiology and radiation oncology, neurosurgery and neuroscience, cardiology and cardiovascular surgery, organ transplantation and human genetics. Its main campus includes the internationally celebrated UH Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital, ranked among the top children's hospitals in the nation; UH MacDonald Women's Hospital, Ohio's only hospital for women; and UH Seidman Cancer Center, part of the NCI-designated Case Comprehensive Cancer Center. University Hospitals Case Medical Center is the 2012 recipient of the American Hospital Association – McKesson Quest for Quality Prize for its leadership and innovation in quality improvement and safety. For more information, go to http://www.uhhospitals.org.



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