[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 11-Jun-2013
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Contact: Tom Vasich
tmvasich@uci.edu
949-824-6455
University of California - Irvine

NIH awards UCI $10 million to study early-life origins of adolescent mental disorders

Funding will support effort to understand developmental impact of maternal signals

Irvine, Calif., June 11, 2013 With $10 million in new federal funding, UC Irvine researchers will study how maternal signals and care before and after birth may increase an infant's vulnerability to adolescent cognitive and emotional problems, such as risky behaviors, addiction and depression.

Led by child neurologist and neuroscientist Dr. Tallie Z. Baram, the UC Irvine team has received a five-year Silvio O. Conte Center grant from the National Institute of Mental Health, which is part of the National Institutes of Health. The funding program brings together researchers with diverse expertise to gain new knowledge and improve the diagnosis and treatment of mental health disorders.

The grant will support the creation of the Conte Center on Brain Programming in Mental Disorders at UC Irvine.

"We appreciate that the National Institute of Mental Health strategic plan recognizes that most neuropsychiatric disorders have origins early in life," said Baram, the Danette "Dee Dee" Shepard Chair in Neurological Studies. "This complex problem requires a multidisciplinary approach that involves both animal and human research. Investigators at UC Irvine have distinguished themselves in this area, and we believe that with the Conte Center funding, we can make major contributions to our understanding of this issue."

A large body of work has suggested that signals conveyed by a mother during fetal growth and the first few years after birth influence a baby's development and cognitive and emotional functioning. The UC Irvine team suspects that the patterns or rhythms of maternal signals, rather than their general quantity or quality, are key.

In neurobiology, it's well known that patterns of signals influence the function of single neurons. Recent research at UC Irvine suggests that patterns also matter on a "macro" scale of the entire brain. Specifically, animal studies have shown that consistent and predictable maternal signals enhance cognitive and emotional development. In contrast, fragmented and unpredictable maternal care might have the opposite effect. Additionally, a study that tracked a cohort of mothers during pregnancy and then with their babies for a few years seemed to confirm this idea.

To connect these discoveries and their impact on adolescent cognitive behaviors, UC Irvine's Conte Center on Brain Programming in Mental Disorders will combine neurobiological and molecular research with animals, behavioral research with children, and neuroimaging and computational statistical analyses. Its goal is to create a comprehensive picture of maternal influences, childhood cognitive and emotional development, and brain structure to help identify children who may be vulnerable to adolescent mental health disorders and to help establish more effective treatments.

Center collaborators include the following:

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About the Conte Center grants: Since 1988, the National Institute of Mental Health has encouraged scientists to seek funding for projects in which a unifying, well-defined question could be approached from many angles and at many levels (for example, genetic, molecular, clinical and behavioral) via its Centers for the Neuroscience of Mental Disorders and Centers for Neuroscience Research. In 1993, these centers were renamed in memory of U.S. Rep. Silvio O. Conte, a champion of neuroscience research and the severely mentally ill. In keeping with the guidelines for Conte Centers, the UC Irvine research effort will focus on translating basic findings into mental health treatments.

About the University of California, Irvine: Founded in 1965, UC Irvine is a top-ranked university dedicated to research, scholarship and community service. Led by Chancellor Michael Drake since 2005, UC Irvine is among the most dynamic campuses in the University of California system, with more than 28,000 undergraduate and graduate students, 1,100 faculty and 9,400 staff. Orange County's second-largest employer, UC Irvine contributes an annual economic impact of $4.3 billion. For more UC Irvine news, visit news.uci.edu.

News Radio: UC Irvine maintains on campus an ISDN line for conducting interviews with its faculty and experts. Use of this line is available for a fee to radio news programs/stations that wish to interview UC Irvine faculty and experts. Use of the ISDN line is subject to availability and approval by the university.

Contact:

Tom Vasich
949-824-6455
tmvasich@uci.edu

UCI maintains an online directory of faculty available as experts to the media. To access, visit http://www.today.uci.edu/experts.

http://news.uci.edu/press-releases/nih-awards-uci-10-million-to-study-early-life-origins-of-adolescent-mental-disorders/



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