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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
11-Jul-2013

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Contact: Jia Liu
liujia@genomics.cn
BGI Shenzhen

Whole genome sequencing opens a new way for the diagnosis and medical therapy for autism

The latest study was published online in American Journal of Human Genetics

July 11, 2013, Shenzhen, China - An international consortium, consisting of Autism Speaks, Duke University School of Medicine, The Hospital for Sick Children of Toronto, BGI and other institutes, has investigated the genetic variants in 32 families with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The results show that whole genome sequencing and analysis promise great value to identify de novo or rare inherited mutations that give rise to autism in ASD groups. The findings were published online today in American Journal of Human Genetics.

Autism is the fastest growing developmental disorder in the United States, or even the whole world. It is estimated that 1 in every 88 children in the United States is diagnosed with autism, which is greater than the prevalence of pediatric AIDS, cancer, and diabetes combined. It can rob the individual of typical development from childhood to adolescence to adulthood, and bring huge burden on the families.

The discoveries of genetic mutations can substantially increase people's understanding of the underlying biology of autism. In this study, researchers surveyed all the risk mutations in ASD patient groups by whole genome sequencing (WGS), and try to fully describe the genetic architecture of autism. The results may give critical insight into the molecular and cellular processes that may be preferentially targeted for disruption by genetic lesions in autism patients.

The study shows that the proportions of deleterious de novo mutations and X-linked or autosomal inherited alterations are higher than the previous reports with 19% and 31%, respectively. Researchers speculated the partial reason maybe the more comprehensive and uniform coverage afforded by WGS. Compared to exome sequencing technology, WGS also shows great advantages in efficiency and accuracy.

Researchers also identified the deleterious mutations variants in 4 novel, 9 known, and 8 candidate autism risk genes, including CAPRIN1 and AFF2 (both linked to FMR1 involved in fragile X syndrome), VIP (involved in social-cognitive deficits), and other genes such as SCN2A and KCNQ2 (also linked to epilepsy), NRXN1, and CHD7, which causes ASD-associated CHARGE syndrome.

"From diagnosis to treatment to prevention, whole genome sequencing efforts like these hold the potential to fundamentally transform the future of medical care for people with autism," stated Autism Speaks Chief Science Officer and study co-author Robert Ring, Ph.D.

Yingrui Li, CEO of BGI Tech, one of BGI's affiliates, said "Whole-genome sequencing may serve as a powerful tool to advance new effective treatments to improve the lives of individuals and families with autism. Early diagnosis is important for autism, which can help a child with autism make significant gains in language and social skills."

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In late 2011, BGI and Autism Speaks jointly launched the Autism Genome 10K Project. Autism Genome 10K will create and analyze the world's largest library of sequenced genomes of individuals with ASD. In Phase one, 96 autistic children and their parents from 32 Canadian families participating in the Autism Speaks Autism Genome Resource Exchange were sequenced.

About Autism Genome 10K

Autism is rooted in genetics, including the mutation of certain genes that result in a failure of neurons in the brain to properly connect. Based on earlier genetic research funded by Autism Speaks, such as the Autism Genome Project (AGP), scientists have discovered some of these genes. But much more gene discovery needs to take place. The Autism Genome 10K Project will mark a substantial leap forward on this journey. The Autism Speaks Autism Genome 10K Project builds on the successes of Autism Speaks' Autism Genetic Resource Exchange program (AGRE), a high-quality collection of more than 12,000 DNA samples from families affected by autism. The AGRE program has facilitated many high-impact scientific discoveries in recent years, including the risk genes discovered by the AGP and other researchers. For more information, please visit http://autismgenome10k.org/index.html

About BGI

BGI was founded in Beijing, China, in 1999 with the mission to become a premier scientific partner for the global research community. The goal of BGI is to make leading-edge genomic science highly accessible, which it achieves through its investment in infrastructure, leveraging the best available technology, economies of scale, and expert bioinformatics resources. BGI, and its affiliates, BGI Americas, headquartered in Cambridge, MA, and BGI Europe, headquartered in Copenhagen, Denmark, have established partnerships and collaborations with leading academic and government research institutions as well as global biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies, supporting a variety of disease, agricultural, environmental, and related applications. BGI has a proven track record of excellence, delivering results with high efficiency and accuracy for innovative, high-profile research: research that has generated over 200 publications in top-tier journals such as Nature and Science. BGI's many accomplishments include: sequencing one percent of the human genome for the International Human Genome Project, contributing 10 percent to the International Human HapMap Project, carrying out research to combat SARS and German deadly E. coli, playing a key role in the Sino-British Chicken Genome Project, and completing the sequence of the rice genome, the silkworm genome, the first Asian diploid genome, the potato genome, and, more recently, have sequenced the human Gut Metagenome, and a significant proportion of the genomes for the1000 Genomes Project.

For more information about BGI, please visit http://www.genomics.cn.

Media Contacts

Bicheng Yang
Public Communication Officer
BGI
+86-755-82639701
yangbicheng@genomics.cn
http://www.genomics.cn



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