[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 26-Aug-2013
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Contact: Juliana Bunim
juliana.bunim@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Pediatric readmission rates aren't indicator of hospital performance

IMAGE: Naomi Bardach, M.D., is an assistant professor of pediatrics at UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital and lead author.

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Readmission rates of adult patients to the same hospital within 30 days are an area of national focus and a potential indicator of clinical failure and unnecessary expenditures.

However, a new UC San Francisco (UCSF) study shows that hospital readmissions rates for children are not necessarily meaningful measures of the quality of their care.

In the first multi-state study of children’s and non-children’s hospitals, assessing pediatric readmission and revisit rates – being admitted into the hospital again or visiting the emergency room within 30 days of discharge – for common pediatric conditions, UCSF researchers found that diagnosis-specific readmission and revisit rates are limited in their usefulness as a quality indicator for pediatric hospital care.

The study found that when comparing hospitals’ performance based on revisits, few hospitals that care for children can be identified as being better or worse than average, even for common pediatric diagnoses.

“As a national way of assessing and tracking hospital quality, pediatric readmissions and revisits, at least for specific diagnoses, are not useful to families trying to find a good hospital, nor to the hospitals trying to improve their pediatric care,” said Naomi Bardach, MD, an assistant professor of pediatrics at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital and lead author. “Measuring and reporting them publicly would waste limited hospital and health care resources.”

The work will be published in the September issue of journal Pediatrics.

Using a multistate database called the State Inpatient and Emergency Department Databases, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, the researchers looked at 958 hospitals admitting children, which were mostly large or medium-sized, and urban. Focusing on seven common inpatient pediatric conditions – asthma, dehydration, pneumonia, appendicitis, skin infections, mood disorders and epilepsy – the researchers then calculated the rates of readmissions and revisits to the hospital within 30 and 60 days of discharge, broken down by the condition for which they were treated.

All of the hospitals in the study had 30-day readmission rates of less than 5 percent in all areas except for epilepsy (6.1 percent), dehydration (6 percent) and mood disorders (7.6 percent).

“With average 30-day readmission rates hovering around 5 percent, there is little space for a hospital to be identified as having better performance,” said Bardach.

For example, of the more than 900 hospitals admitting children, looking at revisit rates for:

“The low number of outliers is likely due to the fact that most hospitals just don’t admit very many kids, because children are healthier than adults,” said Bardach.

The researchers suggest that to improve pediatric readmissions or revisits as a quality measurement, patients admitted with similar diagnoses could be looked at as a group, to increase the sample size at each hospital and lead to the identification of more outliers. “That has the potential to improve the usefulness of readmission rates as a quality indicator,” said Bardach.

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Co-authors of the study include Eric Vittinghoff, PhD; Renee Asteria-Penaloza, MPH; Jinoos Yazdany, MD, MPH; W. John Boscardin, PhD; Michael Cabana, MD, MPH;and R. Adams Dudley, MD, MBA, all of UCSF. Co-authors also are Jeffrey Edwards, MD of Columbia University and Henry C. Lee, MD, of Stanford University.

The work was supported by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and funded by the National Institutes of Health. The authors have reported that they have no conflicts of interest relevant to the contents of this paper to disclose.

UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital creates an environment where children and their families find compassionate care at the forefront of scientific discovery, with more than 150 experts in 50 medical specialties serving patients throughout Northern California and beyond. The hospital admits about 5,000 children each year, including 2,000 babies born in the hospital. For more information, visit http://www.ucsfbenioffchildrens.org.

UCSF is a leading university dedicated to promoting health worldwide through advanced biomedical research, graduate-level education in the life sciences and health professions, and excellence in patient care.

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