[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 21-Aug-2013
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Contact: Kim Menard
kim.menard@uphs.upenn.edu
215-662-6183
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Researchers agree that Alzheimer's test results could be released to research participants

Survey suggests guidance and counseling need to be in place

PHILADELPHIA - A leading group of Alzheimer's researchers contends that, as biomarkers to detect signals of the disease improve at providing clinically meaningful information, researchers will need guidance on how to constructively disclose test results and track how disclosure impacts both patients and the data collected in research studies. A survey conducted by a group including experts from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found that a majority of Alzheimer's researchers supported disclosure of results to study participants. The study is published online in Neurology.

"While this is not a call to immediately tell subjects their biomarker results, it does show that the field is moving to a point where experts want to share valid and meaningful results with participants," said co-senior author Jason Karlawish, MD, professor of Medicine and Medical Ethics and Health Policy. "As we gain more data on the predictive abilities of these measurements, we will need models and methods to effectively reveal results."

The study surveyed 139 Alzheimer's clinical trial leaders and coordinators from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) in April 2012, just before the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the amyloid-binding radiotracer known as Amyvid (florbetapir). 73 percent of respondents supported disclosing amyloid imaging results to study participants with mild cognitive impairment, whereas 58 percent supported giving amyloid imaging results to those with normal cognition.

Six themes emerged from the survey, regarding participant preferences and cognition levels, researchers' requests to develop standardized counseling procedures, participant education, and standardization of data-gathering, and concerns regarding potential harms and benefits to participants, as well as the ways disclosure could impact study results.

Currently, ADNI has a policy to not disclose results to participants, but the survey showed a growing trend of experts who would favor revising this policy. In addition to finding amyloid imaging results valuable, Alzheimer's experts also valued other biomarker data collected in ADNI, such as spinal fluid tests, PET imaging, and other psychometric tests, suggesting that if amyloid imaging results were allowed to be disclosed, it would likely lead to disclosure of other test results.

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The study was conducted by a team of researchers, including Dr. Karlawish, co-senior author Robert Green, MD, MPH, Division of Genetics and Department of Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Melanie Shulman, MD, from New York University Langone Medical Center and Kristin Harkins from Penn's Alzheimer's Disease Center. The study was supported by the Marian S. Ware Alzheimer's Program, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the National Institutes of Health (HG02213, AG027841).

Penn Medicine is one of the world's leading academic medical centers, dedicated to the related missions of medical education, biomedical research, and excellence in patient care. Penn Medicine consists of the Raymond and Ruth Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania (founded in 1765 as the nation's first medical school) and the University of Pennsylvania Health System, which together form a $4.3 billion enterprise.

The Perelman School of Medicine has been ranked among the top five medical schools in the United States for the past 16 years, according to U.S. News & World Report's survey of research-oriented medical schools. The School is consistently among the nation's top recipients of funding from the National Institutes of Health, with $398 million awarded in the 2012 fiscal year.

The University of Pennsylvania Health System's patient care facilities include: The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania -- recognized as one of the nation's top "Honor Roll" hospitals by U.S. News & World Report; Penn Presbyterian Medical Center; and Pennsylvania Hospital the nation's first hospital, founded in 1751. Penn Medicine also includes additional patient care facilities and services throughout the Philadelphia region.

Penn Medicine is committed to improving lives and health through a variety of community-based programs and activities. In fiscal year 2012, Penn Medicine provided $827 million to benefit our community.



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