[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 12-Sep-2013
[ | E-mail Share Share ]

Contact: Darcy Spitz
Darcy.spitz@heart.org
212-878-5940
American Heart Association

High blood pressure reading in kids linked to triple risk for condition as adults

American Heart Association Meeting Report

Children with one or more high blood pressure readings were about three times more likely to develop the condition as adults, in a study presented at the American Heart Association High Blood Pressure Research Scientific Sessions 2013.

After accounting for age, gender and weight, researchers found a direct link between high blood pressure readings during childhood and high blood pressure in adulthood:

The findings suggest even occasional spikes in blood pressure at any age could signal problems later in life and should not be dismissed.

In 1986, researchers began following 1,117 adolescent children who lived in Indianapolis. Blood pressure readings were taken by a school nurse or during a doctor's office visit, and the children were followed for 27 years. Among the study participants, 119 were diagnosed with high blood pressure as adults.

Fifty-nine percent of the adults diagnosed with high blood pressure had been overweight or obese as children. Childhood obesity is a risk factor for high blood pressure and heart disease in adulthood.

"This study highlights the need for pediatricians to regularly check blood pressure and weight," said Wanzhu Tu, Ph.D., study author and professor of biostatistics at Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis, Ind. "An occasional increase in blood pressure does not justify treatment, but it does justify following these children more carefully."

###

Co-authors and author disclosures are on the manuscript.

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and a Veteran's Administration merit award funded the study.

For high blood pressure tools and information visit heart.org/hbp.

For the latest heart and stroke news, follow us on Twitter: @HeartNews.

Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at http://www.heart.org/corporatefunding.



[ Back to EurekAlert! ] [ | E-mail Share Share ]

 


AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.