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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
10-Nov-2013

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Contact: Kat Snodgrass
media@sfn.org
202-962-4090
Society for Neuroscience

New evidence on the biological basis of highly impulsive and aggressive behaviors

For want of a receptor: Some behaviors shaped during early development

SAN DIEGO Physical and chemical changes in the brain during development can potentially play a role in some delinquent and deviant behaviors, according to research released today. Studies looking at the underlying mechanisms that influence our ability to exercise self-control were presented at Neuroscience 2013, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health.

Understanding the impact of changes in specific prefrontal regions during brain development could lead to new treatments and earlier interventions for disorders in which impulsivity plays a key factor. The research may have implications for understanding and dealing with aggressive and troublesome behaviors.

Today's new findings show that:

Other recent findings discussed show that:

"Our deeper understanding of the origins of delinquent behavior can be a double-edged sword," said press conference moderator BJ Casey, PhD, of Weill Cornell Medical College, an expert in attention, behavior, and related brain disorders. "While we're making tremendous gains in neuroscience that should lead to improved treatments, our biological insights also have implications for criminal cases and the judicial process that we need to understand."

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This research was supported by national funding agencies such as the National Institutes of Health, as well as private and philanthropic organizations. More information about behavior and the brain can be found at BrainFacts.org.



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