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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
21-Nov-2013

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Contact: Heather Kharouba
kharouba@ucdavis.edu
530-400-4579
University of British Columbia

Climate change may disrupt butterfly flight seasons

IMAGE: Heather Kharouba is shown with butterfly specimens.

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The flight season timing of a wide variety of butterflies is responsive to temperature and could be altered by climate change, according to a UBC study that leverages more than a century's worth of museum and weather records.

Researchers from UBC, the Université de Sherbrooke and the University of Ottawa combed through Canadian museum collections of more than 200 species of butterflies and matched them with weather station data going back 130 years. They found butterflies possess a widespread temperature sensitivity, with flight season occurring on average 2.4 days earlier per degree celsius of temperature increase.

IMAGE: This image shows butterfly specimens.

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"With warmer temperatures butterflies emerge earlier in the year, and their active flight season occurs earlier," says Heather Kharouba, lead author of the paper published this week in Global Change Biology. "This could have several implications for butterflies. If they emerge too early, they could encounter frost and die. Or they might emerge before the food plants they rely on appear and starve."

"Butterflies are also a bell-weather, and provide an early warning signal for how other wildlife may respond to climate change," adds Kharouba, who conducted the research while completing her PhD at UBC, and is now a post-doctoral researcher with the University of California, Davis.

The researchers utilized the day of collection found in records to estimate the timing of flight season for each species, and compared it with the historical weather data.

IMAGE: This image shows butterfly specimens.

Click here for more information.

The study was possible thanks to the massive amount of data housed in museum collections and records. Much of the butterfly data in Canada has been centralized via the Canadian National Collection of Butterflies -- records in British Columbia being the exception. To gather data for this province, Kharouba relied on private collections. Only a small portion of the butterfly specimens found in UBC's Beaty Biodiversity Museum-Vancouver natural history museum are databased.

"Museum collection records are an under-exploited resource of ecological data and can provide a window into the past, and potentially the future," says Kharouba. "We should invest in efforts to properly database and centralize more of these records."

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Heather Kharouba
Center for Population Biology Postdoctoral Fellow
Department of Evolution and Ecology
University of California, Davis
kharouba.weebly.com
Phone: 530.400.4579
E-mail: kharouba@ucdavis.edu

Silvia Moreno-Garcia
Coordinator, Communications
UBC Faculty of Science
Phone: 604.827.5001
E-mail: silvia.moreno-garcia@science.ubc.ca



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