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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
17-Dec-2013

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Contact: Gozde Zorlu
gozde.zorlu@frontiersin.org
Frontiers

Much room for improvement in access to preventive dental care in the USA

The uptake rate of preventative dental care increased over a ten-year period in the United States, but there remains a large disparity among ethnic groups, reports one of the largest and most comprehensive studies on the subject, published in the open-access journal Frontiers in Public Health.

Neglect of dental care can have serious consequences like decay, inflammation, and loss of teeth, and an increased risk of malnutrition. Gum disease has been implicated in an increased risk of cardiovascular and respiratory disease. Easy access to affordable preventive dental care – in the form of regular checkups and cleanings by dentists or dental hygienists – can help to improve the quality of life of a population.

Oral health is particularly important in a rapidly aging population, because middle-aged and older people are more likely to develop chronic conditions and complications. Yet few studies have focused on the dental health-practices of older persons.

In a new study, Professor Bei Wu, Director for International Research at Duke University's School of Nursing, and her colleagues analyzed self-reported oral health behaviors of almost 650,000 middle-aged and elderly Americans in a phone survey conducted between 1999 to 2008 by the National Center for Statistics and Prevention. This study is the first to compare dental care between Caucasians, Hispanics, African Americans, Asian Americans, and Native Americans.

Respondents were asked when they last had their teeth cleaned by a professional, because dental cleaning is a commonly used indicator of access to dental services. They were also asked about their gender, age, marital status, income, education, ethnicity, weight, general health, number of teeth removed, and drinking and smoking habits.

Results show that the number of people who received preventive dental care underwent a slight yearly increase in all five ethnic groups. But there is a long way to go, as 23% to 43% of Americans received no preventive dental care in 2008, depending on ethnicity.

Key findings include:

The researchers conclude that it is imperative to develop public dental health programs that target middle-aged and elderly Americans, improve dental care access, and to train a dental workforce that is culturally competent.

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The National Institute of Health and the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research funded the study.

Note to editors

1. For a copy of the embargoed paper, please contact Gozde Zorlu:gozde.zorlu@frontiersin.org

2. Please refer to the source of publication, Frontiers in Public Health, and for online articles, please include a link to the study: http://www.frontiersin.org/Journal/10.3389/fpubh.2013.00065/abstract

Article title: Racial and Ethnic Variations in Preventive Dental Care Utilization among Middle-aged and Older Americans, 1999-2008
Journal: Frontiers in Public Health
DOI: 10.3389/fpubh.2013.00065

3. Contact

Prof. Bei Wu
School of Nursing and Global Health Institute
Duke University, USA
Tel: 001-919-684-7534 (office in the US)
Cell: 0086-15676161887 (China)
E-mail: bei.wu@duke.edu

Gozde Zorlu
Press Manager
Frontiers
Switzerland
E-mail: gozde.zorlu@frontiersin.org

4. About Frontiers

Frontiers is a community driven open-access publisher and research networking platform. Launched and run by scientists since 2007, and based in Switzerland, Frontiers empowers researchers to advance the way science is peer-reviewed, evaluated, published, communicated, and shared in the digital era. Frontiers joined the Nature Publishing Group family in 2013.

The "Frontiers in" series of journals has published 14,000 peer reviewed articles, which receive 6 million monthly views, and are supported by 100,000 editors, reviewers and authors worldwide. Frontiers has partnerships with international organizations such as the Max Planck Society and the International Union of Immunological Societies (IUIS). For more information, please visit: http://www.frontiersin.org



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