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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
3-Dec-2013

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Contact: Yasmeen Sands
ysands@fs.fed.us
360-753-7716
USDA Forest Service - Pacific Northwest Research Station

Development near Oregon, Washington public forests

IMAGE: This image shows change in development from 1976 to 2006, from "Changes in Development Near Public Forest Lands in Oregon and Washington, 1974-2005: Implications for Management, " available online at

Click here for more information.

Private development along the edges of most public forests in Oregon and Washington more than doubled since the 1970s, a new study conducted by the U.S. Forest Service Pacific's Northwest (PNW) Research Station has found.

The study, which used aerial photography to inventory structures at the fringes of public forests, is the first to look at development trends in the two states before and after the enactment of land use laws. The findings are reported in Changes in Development Near Public Forest Lands in Oregon and Washington, 1974-2005: Implications for Management, a report published by the PNW Station.

"Although public forests are not necessarily directly subject to development, they still face management issues at their edges because of indirect development pressure," said David Azuma, a research forester at the station who led the study.

In Oregon and Washington, about half of all forest lands are publicly owned and managed by the Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, Oregon Department of Forestry, and Washington Department of Natural Resources. Using a fine-scale grid of points on air photos across the two states, Azuma and colleagues classified areas outside of federal lands for land use and then recorded the number of structures within a 321-meter radius of each of these points.

"Quantifying the increases in structures in areas that have not been converted in land use can serve as a surrogate for the broader risk associated with development near public lands," Azuma said.

Among the study's findings:

The study's findings suggest that areas with increasing development should probably expect continued development. The work can help agencies that manage public forests to better plan for management options at the edges of their land.

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The report is available online (at http://www.treesearch.fs.fed.us/pubs/45205) and in print by request. Printed copies of the report will be available after December 20 and can be requested by emailing pnw_pnwpubs@fs.fed.us or by calling (503) 261-1211 and referencing "PNW-RP-596."

The Pacific Northwest Research Station—headquartered in Portland, Ore.—generates and communicates scientific knowledge that helps people make informed choices about natural resources and the environment. The station has 11 laboratories and centers located in Alaska, Washington, and Oregon and about 400 employees. Learn more online at http://www.fs.fed.us/pnw.



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