[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
10-Jan-2014

[ | E-mail ] Share Share

Contact: Connie Hughes
Connie.Hughes@wolterskluwer.com
646-674-6348
Wolters Kluwer Health

Primary care practitioners hesitate to prescribe antidepressants for depressed teens

Even in severe cases, most wouldn't use medications, says study in Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics

Philadelphia, Pa. (January 10, 2014) – Pediatric primary care practitioners (PCPs) are reluctant to prescribe antidepressant medications to adolescent patients—even those with severe depression, reports a study in the January Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics, the official journal of the Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

Pediatric PCPs who are more knowledgeable about depression—and especially those who have access to an on-site mental health care provider—are more likely to prescribe antidepressants for depressed teens. Lead author Dr Ana Radovic of Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC comments, "With the national shortage of child psychiatrists, education interventions which take into account a primary care provider's feelings of burden when addressing mental health problems and collaborative care with mental health professionals will be needed to increase appropriate prescribing of antidepressant medications to depressed adolescents."

Most PCPs Wouldn't Prescribe Antidepressants for Depressed Teens and Would Refer to Child Psychiatry

In the study, 58 pediatric PCPs were presented with vignettes describing two 15-year-old girls with depression. One scenario met criteria for moderate depression and one for severe depression; neither patient was suicidal. Most of the PCPs were doctors, but some were nurse practitioners or other professionals.

The health care professionals were asked to make an initial treatment recommendation for each patient. Responses were compared with the PCPs' knowledge of depression, attitudes toward dealing with psychosocial issues, and practice characteristics.

Few PCPs said they would prescribe an antidepressant: only one-fourth for the patient with moderate depression and about one-third for the patient with severe depression. Current guidelines recommend antidepressants and/or cognitive behavioral therapy for teens with moderate to severe depression. Antidepressant medications are considered particularly effective for patients with severe depression.

In contrast, most PCPs said they would refer the patients to a child and adolescent psychiatrist for medication management: 60 percent for the patient with moderate depression and 90 percent for the patient with severe depression. Mental health consultation is recommended for severely depressed teens, but not necessarily those with moderate depression.

Education and On-Site Therapists May Improve Appropriate Treatment for Adolescent Depression

Antidepressants were about five times more likely to be recommended by PCPs who had access to an on-site mental health care provider. All PCPs in the study were part of a large pediatric practice network that had access to licensed mental health therapists—some on-site and some in neighboring practices.

Providers who scored higher on a test of depression knowledge were about 70 percent more likely to recommend antidepressants. In contrast, those who felt a higher sense of personal burden when seeing patients for a mental health-related problem were less likely to say they would prescribe antidepressants.

"Adolescent depression is a serious and undertreated public health problem," according to Dr Radovic and coauthors. The U.S. Preventive Task Force recommends routine screening for depression, but teens who screen positive may encounter pediatric PCPs who may have low rates of antidepressant prescribing because of "training and structural barriers." The new study suggests that most pediatric PCPs aren't comfortable recommending antidepressants for depressed teens.

Most PCPs in the study said they would refer depressed adolescent patients to a child and adolescent psychiatrist for evaluation—but the number of teens with depressive symptoms far outweigh the treatment capacity of the child psychiatry work force. For that reason, it's especially important that PCPs who see adolescents be capable and confident in managing depression.

The study shows that PCPs who know more about depression and feel less of a sense of burden seeing patients with mental health-related issues are more likely to prescribe antidepressants, as are those who have on-site access to a mental health care professional. Dr Radovic and colleagues suggest steps that may encourage "guideline-concordant" antidepressant prescribing by PCPs, including continued support and training in depression management, co-management with mental health care providers, and interventions to make PCPs more comfortable in dealing with patients' psychosocial problems.

###

About the Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics

Written for physicians, clinicians, psychologists and researchers, each issue of the Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics is devoted entirely to the developmental and psychosocial aspects of pediatric health care. Each issue brims with original articles, case reports, challenging cases and reviews—the latest work of many of today's best known leaders in related fields—that help professionals across disciplines stay current with the latest information in the field. Relevant areas covered include learning disorders, developmental disabilities, and emotional, behavioral, and psychosomatic problems. Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics is the official journal of the Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics.

About the Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

The Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics (SDBP) is an international organization dedicated to improving the health of infants, children, and adolescents by promoting research, teaching and clinical practice in developmental and behavioral pediatrics. Comprised of more than 700 members, the society strives to promote an understanding of the social, educational, and cultural influences on children.

About Wolters Kluwer Health

Wolters Kluwer Health is a leading global provider of information, business intelligence and point-of-care solutions for the healthcare industry. Serving more than 150 countries and territories worldwide, Wolters Kluwer Health's customers include professionals, institutions and students in medicine, nursing, allied health and pharmacy. Major brands include Health Language®, Lexicomp®, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Medicom®, Medknow, Ovid®, Pharmacy OneSource®, ProVation® Medical and UpToDate®.

Wolters Kluwer Health is part of Wolters Kluwer, a market-leading global information services company. Wolters Kluwer had 2012 annual revenues of €3.6 billion ($4.6 billion), employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide, and maintains operations in over 40 countries across Europe, North America, Asia Pacific, and Latin America. Follow our official Twitter handle: @WKHealth.



[ Back to EurekAlert! ] [ | E-mail Share Share ]

 


AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.