[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
6-Feb-2014

[ | E-mail ] Share Share

Contact: Sudha Kamath
skamath@gmu.edu
703-993-8780
George Mason University

What's love got to do with it?

Plenty, finds groundbreaking study, when it comes to sex

IMAGE: Joshua G. Rosenberger, Ph.D., a professor at George Mason University's College of Health and Human Services in Fairfax, Va., served as lead investigator on the groundbreaking study that asked: What...

Click here for more information.

Fairfax, Va. Feb. 6, 2014 A first-of-its-kind study by researchers at George Mason University's Department of Global and Community Health and Indiana University's Center for Sexual Health Promotion draws some conclusions to an age-old question: What does love have to do with sex, in particular, among gay and bisexual men in the United States?

While most research about love has been conducted among heterosexual-identified individuals or opposite sex couples, the focus of this study on same sex couples suggests experiences of love are far more similar than different, regardless of sexual orientation.

The study, published in the Archives of Sexual Behavior, "Special Section: Sexual Health in Gay and Bisexual Couples," finds nearly all (92.6 percent) men whose most recent sexual event occurred with a relationship partner, indicated being in love with the partner at the time they had sex.

This is the first time a study has described sexual behaviors engaged in by those men who report being in love, or not, during a given sexual event with a same-sex partner.

"Given the recent political shifts around the Defense of Marriage Act and same-sex marriage in the United States, these findings highlight the prevalence and value of loving feelings within same same-sex relationships," said lead investigator Joshua G. Rosenberger, a professor at George Mason's College of Health and Human Services.

Debby Herbenick, a research scientist at Indiana University (IU) and one of the study co-authors, added, "This study is important because of myths and misunderstandings that separate men from love, even though the capacity to love and to want to be loved in return is a human capacity and is not limited by gender or sexual orientation."

The study collected data from an Internet-based survey of almost 25,000 gay and bisexual men residing in the United States who were members of online websites facilitating social or sexual interactions with other men.

"Given the extent to which so much research is focused on the negative aspects of sexual behavior among gay men, particularly as it relates to HIV infection, we were interested in exploring the role of positive affect in this case, love during a specific sexual event," said Rosenberger.

Additional key findings include:

IMAGE: Debby Herbenick, Ph.D., a research assistant at Indiana University's School of Public Health in Bloomington, co-authored the groundbreaking study that asked: What does love have to do with sex, in...

Click here for more information.

"We found it particularly interesting that the vast majority of men reported sex with someone they felt "matched" with in terms of love, meaning that most people who were in love had sex with the person they loved, but that there were also a number of men who had sex in the absence of love," said Herbenick, of the IU School of Public Health in Bloomington. "Very few people had sex with someone they loved if that person didn't love them back. This 'matching' aspect of love has not been well explored in previous research, regardless of sexual orientation."

###

Study authors also included Michael Reece, Center for Sexual Health Promotion, IU School of Public Health in Bloomington; and David S. Novak from Online Buddies Inc.

To find out how to obtain a copy of the study or to interview Rosenberger, contact Sudha Kamath, George Mason University, at 703-933-8780 and skamath@gmu.edu.

To interview Herbenick, contact Tracy James, Indiana University, at 812-855-0084 and traljame@iu.edu.

To reach Online Buddies, Inc., contact Novak at 617-674-8945 or dnovak@online-buddies.com.

About George Mason University

George Mason University is an innovative, entrepreneurial institution with global distinction in a range of academic fields. Located in Northern Virginia near Washington, D.C., Mason provides students access to diverse cultural experiences and the most sought-after internships and employers in the country. Mason offers strong undergraduate and graduate degree programs in engineering and information technology, organizational psychology, health care and visual and performing arts. With Mason professors conducting groundbreaking research in areas such as climate change, public policy and the biosciences, George Mason University is a leading example of the modern, public university. George Mason University Where Innovation Is Tradition.

About Indiana University

IU Bloomington is the flagship residential, research-intensive campus of Indiana University. Its academic excellence is grounded in the humanities, arts and sciences and a range of highly ranked professional programs. Founded in 1820, the campus serves more than 42,000 undergraduate and graduate students pursuing degrees in more than 300 disciplines. Widely recognized for its global and international programs, outstanding technology and historic limestone campus, IU Bloomington serves as a global gateway for students and faculty members pursuing issues of worldwide significance.



[ Back to EurekAlert! ] [ | E-mail Share Share ]

 


AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.