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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
5-Feb-2014

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Contact: Sarah Reed
s.j.reed@leeds.ac.uk
44-113-343-4196
University of Leeds

University of Leeds to be a leader in data analytics and research

Two multi-million pound grants will make the University of Leeds a major centre for 'Big Data' analysis and a national resource that can be used by academics.

The grants, announced today by Minister for Universities and Science David Willetts at the High Performance Computing and Big Data conference in London, were awarded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and the Medical Research Council (MRC).

Sir Alan Langlands, Vice-Chancellor of the University of Leeds, said: "These awards provide a real opportunity for Leeds to establish a leading centre in data analytics which will have clear patient benefits, high social and economic impact and real international reach. The investments from the MRC and ESRC provide an excellent platform for the future."

The funding is part of the Government's support for research that can drive economic growth. Big Data analysis has been identified by ministers as one of "eight great technologies" in which the UK is internationally competitive.

David Willetts said: "Making the most of large and complex data is a huge priority for Government as it has the potential to drive research and development, increase productivity and innovation and ultimately transform lives."

The University of Leeds has been awarded 5.8 million from the MRC and, although the final details are still being negotiated, a further grant of approximately 5 million from the ESRC.

The ESRC grant will be used to establish a new Master's course in Geography and Business, which will help address national skill shortages in Big Data analysis, and will fund a Consumer Data Research Centre (CDRC) that is jointly hosted by the University of Leeds and University College London.

The CDRC will be a national resource that will make data, routinely collected by business and local government organisations, accessible for academics in order to undertake important research in the social sciences to inform policy development, implementation and evaluation.

At Leeds, this data analysis will span a wide range of topics, including research into controlling the spread of epidemics and improving network transport planning. It could also help with other challenges, such as mapping ethical consumer trends and tracing relationships between shopping habits and health outcomes.

Professor Mark Birkin of the University of Leeds' School of Geography, who will lead the ESRC project, said: "The modern consumer environment is producing vast amounts of data that we are only just starting to get to grips with. These data sets can contain enormous volumes of information that, if analysed and studied in the right way, will offer valuable insights into our society."

The ESRC project will be implemented with stringent safeguards in place that protect individual identities through anonymising individuals' information and strictly regulating how information is accessed.

The focus of the MRC-funded research will be to link up electronic health records from people who have already agreed to use of their data for research, with high volume molecular data, such as genome sequences. Careful analysis of these data sets in a secure environment can benefit patients by uncovering the underlying molecular mechanisms of disease, suggest new diagnostic and prognostic tests, help identify therapeutic targets, and monitor how effective medicines are.

Again, this research will be subject to stringent safeguards in relation to patient confidentiality and data protection and will operate to the highest ethical standards.

Professor Jeremy Wyatt, Professor of Health Informatics at the University of Leeds, said: "As well as the obvious boost to medical bioinformatics research in Leeds, the coincidence of both ESRC and MRC funding for research around consumer behaviour, health and genomics opens up unprecedented opportunities to understand the impact of human behaviour on health, and vice versa."

In addition to the ESRC and MRC funding announcement, the University of Leeds has also received research funding for Big Data projects from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC).

The AHRC has awarded the University 280,000 for a project to tackle the problems of how to make data more accessible for the general public, specifically by the use of visualisations.

An award of 183,000 from NERC will enable researchers to expand a processing facility for the enormous amounts of radar data from the ESA satellite Sentinel-1, due to be launched in March. This grant will allow greater access to these data, allowing scientists to monitor and map ground movement in all regions across the world prone to earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, and to monitor the rates of ice loss from Greenland and Antarctica.

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Interviews

Professor Mark Birkin is available for interview. Please contact Sarah Reed, Press Officer, University of Leeds on 0113 343 4196 or email: s.j.reed@leeds.ac.uk.

Further information

Funding by the ESRC under its Business and Local Government Data Research Centres programme.

Funding by the MRC comes from the research council's Medical Bioinformatics capability, capacity and infrastructure initiative.

Notes for editors

1. The University of Leeds is one of the largest higher education institutions in the UK and a member of the Russell Group of research-intensive universities. The 2008 Research Assessment Exercise showed the University of Leeds to be the UK's eighth biggest research powerhouse and the University's vision is to secure a place among the world's leading universities by 2015. http://www.leeds.ac.uk

2. The Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) is the UK's largest organisation for funding research on economic and social issues. It supports independent, high quality research which has an impact on business, the public sector and the third sector. The ESRC's total budget for 2013/14 is 212 million. At any one time the ESRC supports over 4,000 researchers and postgraduate students in academic institutions and independent research institutes. http://www.esrc.ac.uk

3. The Medical Research Council (MRC) has been at the forefront of scientific discovery to improve human health. Founded in 1913 to tackle tuberculosis, the MRC now invests taxpayers' money in some of the best medical research in the world across every area of health. Twenty-nine MRC-funded researchers have won Nobel prizes in a wide range of disciplines, and MRC scientists have been behind such diverse discoveries as vitamins, the structure of DNA and the link between smoking and cancer, as well as achievements such as pioneering the use of randomised controlled trials, the invention of MRI scanning, and the development of a group of antibodies used in the making of some of the most successful drugs ever developed. Today, MRC-funded scientists tackle some of the greatest health problems facing humanity in the 21st century, from the rising tide of chronic diseases associated with ageing to the threats posed by rapidly mutating micro-organisms. http://www.mrc.ac.uk

4. The Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) funds world-class, independent researchers in a wide range of subjects: ancient history, modern dance, archaeology, digital content, philosophy, English literature, design, the creative and performing arts, and much more. This financial year the AHRC will spend approximately 98m to fund research and postgraduate training in collaboration with a number of partners. The quality and range of research supported by this investment of public funds not only provides social and cultural benefits but also contributes to the economic success of the UK. http://www.ahrc.ac.uk

5. The Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) is the largest funder of environmental science in the UK. They invest 330m in cutting-edge research, training and knowledge transfer in the environmental sciences. NERC scientists study and monitor the whole planet, from pole to pole, and from the deep Earth and oceans to the edge of space. They address and respond to critical issues such as environmental hazards, resource security and environmental change. Through collaboration with other science disciplines, with UK business and with policy-makers, NERC ensures that their knowledge and skills support sustainable economic growth and public wellbeing - reducing risks to health, infrastructure, supply chains and our changing environment.



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