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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
5-Mar-2014

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Contact: Laura Rios
awards@agiweb.org
703-379-2480
American Geosciences Institute

Laura Finney to receive the Edward C. Roy, Jr. Award in K-8 Earth Science Teaching

Alexandria, VA Laura Finney, a teacher at Chamberlin Hill Intermediate School in Findlay, Ohio, has been named the 2014 recipient of the Edward C. Roy, Jr. Award for Excellence in K-8 Earth Science Teaching. Finney, who earned her master's degree in curriculum and teaching from Bowling Green State University, has spent her career challenging students in kindergarten through ninth grade with what she calls "authentic experiences" and inquiry-based learning in the Earth sciences.

"Ms. Finney's use of local scientists, field trips and the land lab allows her students to develop and test hypotheses in the Earth sciences using actual data and modern information technologies," said AGI Executive Director Dr. P. Patrick Leahy on recognizing Finney with the award. "This type of instruction not only builds student understanding, but also fosters the workplace skills and builds a lifelong love of Earth science."

Finney will be presented with the award at the National Earth Science Teacher's Association (NESTA) Friends of Earth Science Reception during the National Science Teachers Association 2014 National Conference in Boston in April. Finalists for the award were Brian McDowell of Mason County Middle School in Germantown, Kentucky, and James Christopher Spiegl of Montgomery Bell Academy in Pegram, Tennessee.

Given annually, AGI's Edward C. Roy, Jr. Award recognizes one classroom teacher from kindergarten to eighth grade for leadership and innovation in Earth science education. Their award is named in honor of Dr. Edward C. Roy, Jr., who was a strong and dedicated supporter of Earth science education. To learn more, please see http://bit.ly/1gajFlG.

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The American Geosciences Institute is a nonprofit federation of geoscientific and professional associations that represents more than 250,000 geologists, geophysicists and other earth scientists. Founded in 1948, AGI provides information services to geoscientists, serves as a voice of shared interests in the profession, plays a major role in strengthening geoscience education, and strives to increase public awareness of the vital role the geosciences play in society's use of resources, resiliency to natural hazards, and interaction with the environment



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