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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
19-Mar-2014

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Contact: Johanna Younghans
johanna.younghans@mountsinai.org
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine
@mountsinainyc

New, noninvasive, stool-based colorectal cancer screening test

New method may increase cancer screening rate, says Mount Sinai trial investigator

(New York, March 19, 2014) - A new, non-invasive, stool-based screening test detected 92% of colorectal cancer (CRC), according to a multicenter trial published online today in the New England Journal of Medicine. The new test, which is not yet approved by the FDA, allows patients to collect a sample at home without the need for bowel preparation or diet restrictions.

Unlike other available stool-based CRC screening tests, which rely solely on detecting occult blood in the stool, this new test, called "Cologuard", developed and patented by Exact Sciences, detects both occult blood and abnormal DNA that is shed by polyps and cancers. Although a colonoscopy is the preferred CRC screening method in most of the United States, about 30-35% of individuals do not get screened. Until now, stool-based CRC screening tests that were based on detecting occult blood in the stool had many false-positives and false-negatives; not all blood in the stool is from a polyp or cancer, and not all cancers bleed enough to be detected.

"This test is done in the privacy of your home, on a single specimen, and shipped directly to the lab without the need for freezing the sample," says Steven Itzkowitz, MD, a trial investigator and Professor of Medicine and Director of the Gastroenterology Fellowship Program at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

In the study, participants submitted a stool sample for a commercial occult blood fecal immunochemical test (FIT) as well as for the new multi-target stool DNA test. Everyone then had a colonoscopy as the gold-standard comparator. All enrollees were considered "average-risk", meaning they were asymptomatic men and women 50 years or older, the segment of the population recommended for colorectal cancer screening. Data published today includes that the test detected 92% of colorectal cancer in patients versus FIT's 74%. The test also detected 42% of advanced pre-cancerous lesions in patients as compared to 24% for FIT.

The test might also be useful as an 'interval' look between colonoscopies to make sure lesions are not developing before the next scheduled colonoscopy for higher-risk individuals who are advised to get more frequent colonoscopies.

Dr. Itzkowitz is on the Scientific Advisory Board of Exact Sciences Corporation.

This study was funded by Exact Sciences Corporation.

Other authors include experts from Indiana University, University of North Carolina, Mayo Clinic Rochester, MN; Kaiser Permanente Medical Center, Walnut Creek, California; Boston Biostatistics Research Foundation, Boston, MA; and Exact Sciences Corporation, Madison, WI.

The Cologuard test is limited to investigational use only and is not available for sale in the United States.

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About the Mount Sinai Health System

The Mount Sinai Health System is an integrated health system committed to providing distinguished care, conducting transformative research, and advancing biomedical education. Structured around seven member hospital campuses and a single medical school, the Health System has an extensive ambulatory network and a range of inpatient and outpatient services--from community-based facilities to tertiary and quaternary care.

The System includes approximately 6,600 primary and specialty care physicians, 12-minority-owned free-standing ambulatory surgery centers, over 45 ambulatory practices throughout the five boroughs of New York City, Westchester, and Long Island, as well as 31 affiliated community health centers. Physicians are affiliated with the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, which is ranked among the top 20 medical schools both in National Institutes of Health funding and by U.S. News & World Report.

For more information, visit http://www.mountsinai.org, or find Mount Sinai on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.



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