Public Release:  Digestive Disease Week press program highlights announced -- register now

Digestive Disease Week offers reporters increased access to researchers

Digestive Disease Week

This year's Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) press program features the latest research on new treatments for hepatitis C, the promise and challenges ahead in microbiome research, new technological advances in colorectal cancer screening, and how things like grape seeds, caffeine and other dietary choices affect digestive health.

Review DDW abstracts on these and other topics at

We've heard your feedback and, this year, are giving reporters more access to the researchers and subject matter experts who are the leaders in the field. The press program includes:

  • Expert Office Hours: each day, researchers and subject matter experts will be in the press room to meet with you one-on-one.

  • Google+ Reporter Round Table: GI and hepatology thought leaders will participate in an interactive discussion with reporters in Chicago and around the U.S.

  • TweetChats: Experts will participate in a moderated TweetChat to discuss trends and the latest research in the areas of hepatitis C, microbiome, colorectal cancer and irritable bowel syndrome -- one topic each day. You can participate in the TweetChat using #DDW14Chat.

  • Pre-Conference Telebriefing: On Thursday, April 24, at noon ET, Dr. Lawrence Freidman, DDW council chair, will moderate a panel of experts highlighting a sampling of exciting research being presented at DDW and offer other insight on what you can expect from DDW 2014. A formal invitation with registration information is forthcoming. Mark your calendars!


Register now to secure your spot -- Once you've registered, get tips on how to maximize your experience. A listing of sessions is available in the preliminary program.

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