[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
25-Apr-2014

[ | E-mail ] Share Share

Contact: Clare Bebb
c.bebb@liv.ac.uk
44-015-170-53135
Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine

Researchers at LSTM part of the international team to sequence the tsetse genome

Genetic code of the tsetse sequenced and annotated

Researchers from LSTM are among those who have sequenced the genome of a species of tsetse fly (Glossina morsitans). The outcomes of this research will be invaluable to understanding more about the tsetse and other insect vector biology, knowledge which can be applied to improving the current vector control methods and may lead to more effective and affordable control strategies.

A paper summarising some of the findings will be published in the journal Science today, with more specific and in depth analyses of various aspects of tsetse biology being published as a collection of 10 papers within the PLOS family of journals.

The tsetse fly is the vector for African trypanosomiasis, a potentially fatal disease in people (sleeping sickness) and livestock (Nagana), throughout sub-Saharan Africa, with an estimated 70 million people at risk of infection. Unlike other disease vectors, such as mosquitoes and sandflies, both sexes of the tsetse fly feed exclusively on vertebrate blood, meaning that all tsetse are capable of spreading the disease. To deal with the nourishment issues arising from feeding exclusively on blood the tsetse has formed complex relationships with three different symbiotic bacteria. It is also unusual among insects as it gives birth to live young having evolved to lactate in order to provide nourishment to intrauterine offspring.

The work was carried out over a 10 year period following the formation of the International Glossina Genome Initiative in 2003. Around 146 scientists have contributed to the work, including members of the departments of Vector Biology, Parasitology and Clinical Sciences within LSTM, along with colleagues from around the world, with at least half of the contributors being from African institutions.

LSTM's Professor Mike Lehane was a member of the project leadership team and describes the significance of the work: "Human infections with African trypanosomes can be fatal if left untreated. It has not been possible to develop a vaccine for the disease due to the ability of trypanosomes to evade the mammalian immune system, this coupled with the fact that there are some significant side-effects and reports of growing resistance to current trypanocidal drug treatments means that vector control strategies remain the best hope to eliminate the disease.

"The work that has been carried out by such a large group of international researchers and scientists has not been without its challenges, but has given us detailed information on a wide range of aspects of tsetse biology. It has provided us with a vital research tool, which will be continually added to over time and may well lead to control strategies that can bring an end to suffering caused by the disease both in terms of the human cost as well as the economic losses due to affected livestock."

###

As part of the satellite papers published by the PLOS journals, the group of Dr Acosta Serrano has also contributed with one in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases (Rose Clair, et al., 'An investigation into the protein composition of the teneral Glossina morsitans morsitans peritrophic matrix').

Note for Editors:

Those involved from LSTM are:

Mike Lehane, Lee R. Haines, Deirdre Walshe, CherPheng Ooi, Urvashi N. Ramphul, Stella Lehane, Alvaro Acosta Serrano, Clair Rose, Alistair Darby

Clair Rose was recently awarded the best student talk by the British Society of Parasitology in relation to her work on the satellite paper.

For further information, please contact:

Mrs Clare Bebb
Senior Media Officer
Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine
Office: +44 (0)151 705 3135
Mobile: +44 (0)7889535222
Email: c.bebb@liv.ac.uk

Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM) has been engaged in the fight against infectious, debilitating and disabling diseases since 1898 and continues that tradition today with a research portfolio in excess of well over 200 million and a teaching programme attracting students from over 65 countries.

For further information, please visit: http://www.lstmliverpool.ac.uk



[ Back to EurekAlert! ] [ | E-mail Share Share ]

 


AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.