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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
25-Apr-2014

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Contact: Andrea Carrothers
andrea.carrothers@porternovelli.com
202-973-3604
Porter Novelli

Are almonds an optimal snack?

Almonds examined for effects on diet quality, appetite, adiposity and cardiovascular disease risk factors at Experimental Biology 2014

Modesto, CA (April 25, 2014) - Six new almond-related research studies will be presented next week in San Diego at the American Society of Nutrition (ASN)'s Scientific Sessions and Annual Meeting, held in conjunction with Experimental Biology 2014 (EB). The conference attracts an international audience of approximately 13,000 leading scientists specializing in various health disciplines.

The science presented will reveal new insights on the effects of almond consumption on overall diet quality and health status, abdominal adiposity, measures of appetite and satiety, and cardiovascular risk factors.

"Presenting new research to this audience of scientists and health professionals is critical to turning the findings into practical application and recommendations, said Dr. Karen Lapsley, Chief Science Officer for the Almond Board of California. "These results help to advance the evolution of our understanding of almonds' beneficial effects as part of a healthy diet." In a satellite session on Sunday, April 27 (1), researchers will explore the question, "Are Almonds an Optimal Snack?" a hot topic given that snacking has become a way of life for most Americans. In fact, 97% of Americans report eating at least one snack a day, with 40% consuming three to four snacks per day (2), so understanding and education about smart snacking is increasingly important.

Additional research examining the relationship between almond consumption and cardiovascular and diabetes risk factors will be showcased in a number of poster presentations at the conference:

The body of evidence that will be presented suggests snacking can be a weight-wise strategy, depending upon the foods consumed. The nutrient profile of almonds low on the glycemic index and providing a powerful nutrient package including hunger-fighting protein (6 g/oz), filling dietary fiber (4 g/oz), "good" monounsaturated fats (13 g/oz) (8), and important vitamins and minerals such as vitamin E (7.4 mg/oz), magnesium (200 mg/oz) and potassium (77 mg/oz), makes them a satisfying, heart-smart (8) snack choice that can help support a healthy weight.

The research presented reflects the Almond Board of California's strong commitment to the advancement of nutrition science. Lapsley said, "To date, the California almond industry has invested over $15 million in nutrition research that has resulted in more than 100 papers published by internationally recognized scientists in peer review journals. The Almond Board of California is proud to present science at the elite level of Experimental Biology."

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(1) O'Neil CE, Mattes R, Kris-Etherton P. Are almonds an optimal snack? New research on the health effects of almonds. American Society for Nutriton Sponsored Satellite Program, Experimental Biology 2014, San Diego, CA, held April 27, 2014.

(2) Piernas C, Popkin BM. Snacking increased among U.S. adults between 1977 and 2006. J Nutr 2010; 140:325-332.

(3) Consumption of almonds is associated with increased nutrient intake, better diet quality, and better physiological status in adult participants (19+ y) from the NHANES (2001-2010). Papanikolaou Y, O'Neil CE, Nicklas TA., Fulgoni VL. Program No: 810.17; Poster session: C120.

(4) Effects of almonds as a snack or meal accompaniment on appetite, glycemia and body weight. Tan S-Y and Mattes RD. Experimental Biology 2014; Abstract No. 1927, Program No: 641.9; Poster presentation.

(5) Daily almond consumption (1.5 oz./d) decreases abdominal and leg adiposity in mildly hypercholesterolemic individuals. Berryman, CE, et al. Experimental Biology 2014, Program No: 117.8 ; Oral presentation.

(6) Almond supplementation without dietary advice significantly reduces C-reactive protein in subjects with poorly-controlled type 2 diabetes. Sweazea K.L., Johnston C.S., Ricklefs, K., Petersen, K., Alanbagy, S. Program No: 830.24 ; Poster session: C386

(7) The Effect of Almond Consumption on Satiety and the Postprandial Metabolic Response in High-Risk Pregnant Women. Henderson, M.N. Henderson, Sawrey-Kubicek, L., Mauldin, K. King, J.C. Program No: 1040.5 ; Poster session: C289

(8) Good news about almonds and heart health. Scientific evidence suggests, but does not prove, that eating 1.5 ounces of most nuts, such as almonds, as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol may reduce the risk of heart disease. One serving on almonds (28g) has 13g of unsaturated fat and only 1g of saturated fat.

California Almonds are a natural, wholesome and quality food product, making almonds California's leading agricultural export in terms of value. The Almond Board of California promotes almonds through its research-based approach to all aspects of marketing, farming and production on behalf of the more than 6,000 California Almond growers and processors, many of whom are multi-generational family operations. Established in 1950 and based in Modesto, California, the Almond Board of California is a non-profit organization that administers a grower-enacted Federal Marketing Order under the supervision of the United States Department of Agriculture. For more information on the Almond Board of California or almonds, visit http://www.Almonds.com.

CONTACT:

Andrea Carrothers
(202) 973-3604
andrea.carrothers@porternovelli.com

Molly Spence
(209) 568-9532
mspence@almondboard.com



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