Public Release:  New clinical definition for epilepsy improves diagnosis accuracy

Wiley

An expert task force has created a new definition for epilepsy that refines the scope of patients diagnosed with this brain disease. The study published in Epilepsia, a journal published by Wiley on behalf of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE), provides a greater level of detail to diagnose epilepsy by including individuals with two unprovoked seizures, and those with one unprovoked seizure and other factors that increase risk of seizure recurrence.

The 2005 report by the ILAE task force defined an epileptic seizure as "a transient occurrence of signs and/or symptoms due to abnormal excessive or synchronous neuronal activity in the brain" and epilepsy as "a disorder of the brain characterized by an enduring predisposition to generate epileptic seizures, and by the neurobiologic, cognitive, psychological, and social consequences of this condition. The definition of epilepsy requires the occurrence of at least one epileptic seizure."

"Why change the definition of epilepsy?" asks task force lead author Dr. Robert Fisher from Stanford University School of Medicine. "The 2005 definition does not allow a patient to outgrow epilepsy, nor does it take into account some clinicians' views that epilepsy is present after a first unprovoked seizure when there is a high risk for another. The task force recommendation resolves these issues with the new, more practical, definition of epilepsy that is aimed at clinicians. However, some researchers might use criteria similar to those of the older definition to facilitate comparison with prior studies."

The task force suggests that epilepsy is a disease of the brain defined as:

    1. At least two unprovoked (or reflex) seizures occurring more than 24 hours apart; or

    2. One unprovoked (or reflex) seizure and a probability of further seizures similar to the general recurrence risk (at least 60%) after two unprovoked seizures, occurring over the next 10 years; or

    3. Diagnosis of an epilepsy syndrome.

"The burden of determining recurrence risk does not fall on the clinician. If information is not available on recurrence risk after a first seizure, then the definition defaults to the old definition," adds Dr. Fisher. According to the article epilepsy is "resolved" in individuals who are past the applicable age of an age-dependent epilepsy syndrome, or those that have been free of seizures for the last 10 years and off anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) for 5 years or more. The authors note that, the meaning of "resolved" is not identical to that of "remission" or "cure."

"The published definitions were supported with factual data, but in some cases medical evidence did not exist and the task force used a "consensus" approach for these definitions," explains Drs. Gary Mathern and Astrid Nehlig, Editors-in-Chief of Epilepsia. In these instances, the editors are asking readers' opinions adding, "We encourage you to go to http://surveys.verticalresponse.com/a/show/1539433/ea840f4206/0 to share your feedback regarding the new definition of epilepsy."

###

This study is published in Epilepsia. Media wishing to receive a PDF of this article may contact sciencenewsroom@wiley.com.

Full citation: "A Practical Clinical Definition of Epilepsy." Robert S. Fisher, Carlos Acevedo, Alexis Arzimanoglou, Alicia Bogacz, J. Helen Cross, Christian E. Elger, Jerome Engel Jr, Lars Forsgren, Jacqueline A. French, Mike Glynn, Dale C. Hesdorffer, B.-I. Lee, Gary W. Mathern, Solomon L. Moshé, Emilio Perucca, Ingrid E. Scheffer, Torbjörn Tomson, Masako Watanabe, and Samuel Wiebe. Epilepsia; Published Online: April 14, 2014 (DOI: 10.1111/epi.12550).

URL Upon Publication: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/epi.12550

Editorial "From the Editors: Names Count--The New Operational Definition of Epilepsy and Epilepsia's Poll." Gary Mathern and Astrid Nehlig. Epilepsia; Published Online: April 14, 2014 (DOI: 10.1111/epi.12589).

URL Upon Publication: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/epi.12589

Author Contact: Media wishing to speak with Dr. Fisher may contact Michelle Brandt with Stanford University at mbrandt@stanford.edu. To speak with Dr. Mathern, please contact contact Amy Albin with UCLA at AAlbin@mednet.ucla.edu.

About the Journal

Epilepsia is the leading, most authoritative source for current clinical and research results on all aspects of epilepsy. As the journal of the International League Against Epilepsy, subscribers every month will review scientific evidence and clinical methodology in: clinical neurology, neurophysiology, molecular biology, neuroimaging, neurochemistry, neurosurgery, pharmacology, neuroepidemiology, and therapeutic trials. For more information, please visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1528-1167.

About the International League Against Epilepsy

The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) is the world's preeminent association of physicians and health professionals working toward a world where no person's life is limited by epilepsy. Since 1909 the ILAE has provided educational and research resources that are essential in understanding, diagnosing and treating persons with epilepsy. The ILAE supports health professionals, patients, and their care providers, governments, and the general public worldwide by advancing knowledge of epilepsy.

About Wiley

Wiley is a global provider of content-enabled solutions that improve outcomes in research, education, and professional practice. Our core businesses produce scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, reference works, books, database services, and advertising; professional books, subscription products, certification and training services and online applications; and education content and services including integrated online teaching and learning resources for undergraduate and graduate students and lifelong learners.

Founded in 1807, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. (NYSE: JWa, JWb), has been a valued source of information and understanding for more than 200 years, helping people around the world meet their needs and fulfill their aspirations. Wiley and its acquired companies have published the works of more than 450 Nobel laureates in all categories: Literature, Economics, Physiology or Medicine, Physics, Chemistry, and Peace. Wiley's global headquarters are located in Hoboken, New Jersey, with operations in the U.S., Europe, Asia, Canada, and Australia. The Company's website can be accessed at http://www.wiley.com.

Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.