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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
2-May-2014

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Contact: Anne DeLotto Baier
abaier@health.usf.edu
813-974-3303
University of South Florida (USF Health)

Study shows link between sleep apnea and hospital maternal deaths

The common sleep disorder was also associated with uncommon medical conditions leading to pregnancy-related deaths, large-scale analysis by the University of South Florida indicated

IMAGE: Dr. Judette Louis, assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the USF Health Morsani College of Medicine, led the large-scale national study appearing in the journal SLEEP. She specializes in...

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Tampa, FL (May 2, 2014) -- Pregnant women with obstructive sleep apnea are more than five times as likely to die in the hospital than those without the sleep disorder, a comprehensive national study by the University of South Florida researchers found.

Among delivery-related hospital discharges, sleep apnea was also associated with an increase in severe medical conditions that are top causes of maternal death, including preeclampsia, eclampsia, an enlarged heart and pulmonary blood clots, reported the study published online this month in the journal SLEEP.

Sleep apnea causes repeated awakenings and pauses in breathing during the night. Previous smaller studies have found that the condition increases the risk for poor pregnancy outcomes, including preeclampsia (high blood pressure in pregnancy associated with loss of protein in the urine), restricted growth of the fetus, preterm delivery and gestational diabetes. Obesity appears to contribute to the adverse effects.

However, the USF study provided the first large-scale U.S. analysis of the association between sleep apnea and maternal deaths.

"The astounding association with maternal death was surprising," said lead author Judette Louis, MD, MPH, assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the USF Health Morsani College of Medicine who works out of Tampa General Hospital. "I did not expect to find such a difference in mortality between pregnant women who had sleep apnea and those who did not, especially when we controlled for obesity and other complicating factors.

While more study is needed, the increased likelihood of death for those with sleep apnea may be explained in part by the physiological demands of pregnancy, she said. "Underlying damage or chronic disease caused by sleep apnea may be exacerbated by the stresses of pregnancy."

Maternal death rates have increased slightly in recent years, and obesity is one suspected reason.

"Our study indicates that sleep apnea may also play a role, whether a woman is obese or not," said Dr. Louis, who holds a joint appointment in the USF College of Public Health's Department of Community and Family Health. "It's important for obstetricians and primary care practitioners to identify sleep apnea in younger women of reproductive age, convey its risk, and treat the condition before pregnancy."

IMAGE: Dr. Judette Louis, assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, studies the association between obstructive sleep apnea and maternal-infant mortality and...

Click here for more information.

The researchers drew upon a nationally representative sample of 55 million maternal-related hospital discharges from 1998 to 2009 - women who were pregnant or gave birth while in the hospital. They identified those with sleep apnea diagnoses and examined the links between this sleep-disordered breathing and poor pregnancy health outcomes, including in-hospital deaths.

Among the retrospective study's findings:

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Article citation:

Louis JM, Mogos MF, Salemi JL, Redline S, Salihu HM. "Obstructive sleep apnea and severe maternal-infant morbidity/mortality in the United States, 1998-2009." SLEEP, 2014;37(5):843-849.

USF Health's mission is to envision and implement the future of health. It is the partnership of the USF Health Morsani College of Medicine, the College of Nursing, the College of Public Health, the College of Pharmacy, the School of Biomedical Sciences and the School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Sciences; and the USF Physician's Group. The University of South Florida is a Top 50 research university in total research expenditures among both public and private institutions nationwide, according to the National Science Foundation. For more information, visit http://www.health.usf.edu



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