[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
26-Jun-2014

[ | E-mail ] Share Share

Contact: Tracy Hampton
thampton@nasw.org
American Society of Nephrology
@ASNKidney

Risk factors for chronic kidney disease are present decades before diagnosis

Obesity, high blood pressure, high triglycerides, and diabetes increase future risk

Washington, DC (June 26, 2014) -- Risk factors for chronic kidney disease (CKD) are present and identifiable 30 years before diagnosis, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN). The findings suggest avenues for future research to determine whether certain early interventions can prevent future kidney disease.

Approximately 60 million people globally have CKD. Caroline S. Fox, MD MPH, Gearoid McMahon, MB, BCh (National Heart Lung and Blood Institute's Framingham Heart Study and the Center for Population Studies), and their colleagues investigated whether CKD risk factors might be present decades before the diagnosis of CKD. "One of the benefits of the Framingham Heart Study is that we have a very long duration of follow-up. As a result, we are able to look far back in time prior to when individuals develop a disease to examine their risk factors," said Dr. Fox.

The researchers identified 441 new cases of CKD among participants of the Framingham Heart Study, and they matched them with 882 controls who did not develop CKD. Those who ultimately developed CKD were 76% more likely to have had hypertension, 71% more likely to have been obese, and 43% more likely to have had higher triglycerides 30 years before CKD diagnosis. They were also 38% more likely to have had hypertension, 35% more likely to have had higher triglyceride levels, and nearly 3-times more likely to have had diabetes 20 years before CKD diagnosis. The more risk factors an individual had in the past, the more likely they were to develop CKD.

"This research shows that these risk factors are present long before the disease is diagnosed. This is important because it suggests that we should be addressing these risk factors earlier in life to potentially prevent future disease," said Dr. McMahon.

###

Study co-authors include Sarah Preis, ScD, PhD and Shih-Jen Hwang, PhD.

Disclosures: The authors reported no financial disclosures.

The article, entitled "Mid-Adulthood Risk Factor Profiles for CKD," will appear online at http://jasn.asnjournals.org/ on June 26, 2014.

The content of this article does not reflect the views or opinions of The American Society of Nephrology (ASN). Responsibility for the information and views expressed therein lies entirely with the author(s). ASN does not offer medical advice. All content in ASN publications is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions, or adverse effects. This content should not be used during a medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Please consult your doctor or other qualified health care provider if you have any questions about a medical condition, or before taking any drug, changing your diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment. Do not ignore or delay obtaining professional medical advice because of information accessed through ASN. Call 911 or your doctor for all medical emergencies.

Founded in 1966, and with more than 14,000 members, the American Society of Nephrology (ASN) leads the fight against kidney disease by educating health professionals, sharing new knowledge, advancing research, and advocating the highest quality care for patients.



[ Back to EurekAlert! ] [ | E-mail Share Share ]

 


AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.