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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
10-Jun-2014

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Contact: Elena Falcone-Relvas
efalconerelvas@lifespan.org
401-793-7484
Lifespan

Miriam Hospital study shows how to make statewide health campaigns more effective

PROVIDENCE, R.I. - Researchers from The Miriam Hospital have found that adding evidence-based weight loss strategies to a statewide wellness campaign improves weight loss outcomes among participants. The study and its findings are published online in advance of print in the American Journal of Public Health.

Lead researcher Tricia Leahey, Ph.D., and her colleagues chose to conduct a study among participants in Rhode Island's annual, three-month statewide health campaign. Called Shape Up Rhode Island (SURI), the campaign was founded in 2005 and takes a grass roots approach in reaching Rhode Islanders.

Leahey says, "Given their reach, statewide wellness initiatives like Shape Up Rhode Island have the potential to improve health in large numbers of individuals; however, weight losses produced are typically modest. Thus, we examined whether adding evidence-based weight loss strategies to a statewide wellness campaign improves weight loss outcomes. We found that such an approach was effective and could, therefore, significantly improve the public health impact of these campaigns."

As a researcher with the Weight Control and Diabetes Research Center of The Miriam Hospital, Leahey led the randomized trial. For the study, 230 participants were recruited from the 2011 SURI campaign and were randomly assigned to one of three groups: the standard SURI program, the SURI program plus an evidence-based internet behavioral weight loss program, or SURI plus the evidence-based internet program with the option to attend weekly group weight loss sessions.

At the end of three months, weight loss differed among all three groups. Both of the evidence-based approaches resulted in a significantly greater weight loss compared to the SURI campaign alone. In addition, the evidence-based programs increased the percentage of individuals who achieved a 5 percent, or clinically meaningful, weight loss. Among those who were using the evidence-based internet program in addition to SURI, 42 percent of the participants achieved a 5 percent weight goal; as did 54 percent of the group who also attended the weekly group sessions. Among participants using SURI alone, only 7 percent achieved a 5 percent weight loss.

Of the findings, Leahey says, "We show that adding evidence-based behavioral weight loss strategies to a statewide campaign improves the magnitude of weight loss and increases the percentage of individuals who achieve a clinically meaningful weight loss (i.e., a weight loss that is associated with reduced risk for diabetes and other health problems) six-fold. Moreover, the internet-based approach (i.e., that did not involve weekly group sessions) was the most cost effective."

Leahey concludes, "The results of this study are important because they show that incorporating evidence-based strategies into wide-reaching wellness initiatives could have a meaningful impact on the health of our communities."

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Leahey's primary affiliation is The Miriam Hospital. Funding for this study was provided by the National Institutes of Health. Leahey is also an assistant professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Human Behavior) at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University. Other researchers in the study include J. Graham Thomas, Ph.D., Joseph Fava, Ph.D., Katie Krupel, M.S. and Rena Wing, Ph.D., all of The Miriam Hospital and Alpert Medical School; Leslee Subak, M.D. and Michael Schembri, B.S., of the University of California San Francisco;; Rajiv Kumar, M.D., of Shape Up Rhode Island; Brad Weinberg, M.D. of Blueprint Health, Inc.

About The Miriam Hospital

The Miriam Hospital is a 247-bed, not-for-profit teaching hospital affiliated with The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University. It offers expertise in cardiology, oncology, orthopedics, men's health, and minimally invasive surgery and is home to the state's first Joint Commission-certified Stroke Center and robotic surgery program. The hospital, which received more than $23 million in external research funding last year, is nationally known for its HIV/AIDS and behavioral and preventive medicine research, including weight control, physical activity and smoking cessation. The Miriam Hospital has been awarded Magnet Recognition for Excellence in Nursing Services four times and is a founding member of the Lifespan health system. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter (@MiriamHospital) and Pinterest.



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