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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
17-Jul-2014

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Contact: Tracy Hampton
thampton@nasw.org
American Society of Nephrology

Cost of kidney donation may be too much for potential donors with low income

Living kidney donation rates dropping among low income populations in the US

Washington, DC (July 17, 2014) The decline in living kidney donation over the past several years has been concerning and is poorly understood. A study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN) identifies low income as an important barrier to living donation, and more importantly, implies that this barrier is becoming more difficult to overcome over time. The findings suggest a need to better understand the financial barriers to living donation and to develop more effective strategies to overcome them.

For their study, Jagbir Gill, MD, MPH (University of British Columbia, in Vancouver) and his colleagues divided the US population based on the median household income level of residents' zip codes, and they examined the rates of living donation between 1999 and 2010 in high and low income populations.

The researchers found that lower income populations consistently had lower rates of living donation compared with higher income populations. Most striking, however, was the finding that the difference in living donation rates between lower and higher income populations was much larger in recent years than it was in the past.

"Since 2004, lower income populations experienced a large decline in living donation, while living donation in higher income populations was more stable," said Dr. Gill. "These results suggest that financial barriers to living donation need to be further addressed in order to make it easier for patients to consider and pursue living kidney donation."

Beyond the obvious benefits of improved survival and quality of life for transplant patients, each living kidney donation is estimated to result in a net health care savings of $100,000. There are considerable financial costs to donating a kidney, though, with an average estimated cost of $5000 and some reports citing costs as high as $20,000.

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Study co-authors include Jianghu Dong, MSc and John Gill, MD, MS.

Disclosures: The authors reported no financial disclosures.

The article, entitled "Population Income and Longitudinal Trends in Living Kidney Donation in the United States," will appear online at http://jasn.asnjournals.org/ on July 17, 2014.

The content of this article does not reflect the views or opinions of The American Society of Nephrology (ASN). Responsibility for the information and views expressed therein lies entirely with the author(s). ASN does not offer medical advice. All content in ASN publications is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions, or adverse effects. This content should not be used during a medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Please consult your doctor or other qualified health care provider if you have any questions about a medical condition, or before taking any drug, changing your diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment. Do not ignore or delay obtaining professional medical advice because of information accessed through ASN. Call 911 or your doctor for all medical emergencies.

Founded in 1966, and with more than 14,000 members, the American Society of Nephrology (ASN) leads the fight against kidney disease by educating health professionals, sharing new knowledge, advancing research, and advocating the highest quality care for patients.



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