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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
16-Jul-2014

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Contact: Bret Coons
bcoons@nmh.org
312-926-2955
Northwestern Memorial Hospital

Researchers develop EHR algorithms to identify undiagnosed hypertension

New study lead by Northwestern Medicine physician finds way to screen for hypertension using data

CHICAGO – A new study authored by Northwestern Medicine® researchers found that reviewing electronic health records (EHRs) using algorithms can successfully identify patients with previously undiagnosed hypertension, or high blood pressure, with a high rate of accuracy. Of the 1,033 patients that were identified with the EHR algorithms and evaluated, 361 were formally diagnosed with the hypertension and 290 others were diagnosed with related blood pressure conditions such as prehypertension, white-coat hypertension or elevated blood pressure. The study, "A Technology-Based Quality Innovation to Identify Undiagnosed Hypertension Among Active Primary Care Patients," was published in the 2014 July/August issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), hypertension affects one in three adults in Americans and is referred to as the "silent killer" because it rarely exhibits any warning signs, causing many to never know they had it. Because of the nature of this serious condition, hypertension is associated with more than 50 billion of dollars in costs related to medical care and lost productivity in America alone.

"Hypertension is easy to miss if someone is seeing multiple physicians," said the study's co-author David W. Baker, MD, MPH, chief of internal medicine and geriatrics at Northwestern Memorial Hospital and Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. "A patient may see one doctor who thinks the blood pressure is due to the patient not feeling well that day and then see another doctor for a different problem who thinks the blood pressure is high because the patient was hurrying to make the appointment. No one puts all of these readings together and realizes a person's blood pressure is always elevated."

In the first part of the study, patients were identified as being at risk for undiagnosed hypertension using the three EHR algorithms and were invited to complete an automated office blood pressure (AOBP) test. AOBP testing was designed to eliminate falsely elevated blood pressure results associated with patients being in the presence of a health care provider, a condition known as the white coat effect. In the study, this blood pressure test was started by a medical assistant, who then left the patient alone in their examination room while the testing device obtained six blood pressures readings at one minute intervals. To best eliminate the white coat effect, the first reading was automatically thrown out and the remaining five were then averaged together to provide a single blood pressure reading that is much more accurate and representative of a patient's true blood pressure than a single manual office blood pressure test.

In the second part of the study, additional patients at risk for unidentified hypertension were identified with the same three EHR algorithms, and were then observed over the course of two years. These patients were contacted by health care staff and asked to arrange a follow-up appointment. All of the primary care physicians that participated in the study also received monthly lists of their patients who remained at risk for having hypertension according to the algorithms. Patients remained on the physicians' lists until an AOBP evaluation was completed or a diagnosis was entered into the chart that indicated the patient's at-risk status had been resolved.

"With this study, we created a surveillance system that notifies the medical staff and the primary care physician anytime a patient who is at risk arrives in the office," said principal investigator Michael K. Rakotz, MD, a family medicine physician at Northwestern Medicine Evanston . "Once these patients are identified we proceed with an AOBP to more accurately measure their blood pressure and make a diagnosis. This surveillance system never stops running, so any patient that meets the EHR algorithm criteria for possible hypertension will automatically be flagged. In doing so we hope to put an end to undiagnosed hypertension."

The study's authors conclude that in addition to using algorithms to screen EHR data for patients at risk for undiagnosed hypertension, this method may also be applicable to other commonly undiagnosed chronic diseases.

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To learn more about testing for hypertension or to schedule an appointment, call 312-926-0779 or visit Northwestern Medicine's website.

About Northwestern Medicine®

Northwestern Medicine® is the collaboration between Northwestern Memorial HealthCare and Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine around a strategic vision to transform the future of healthcare. It encompasses the research, teaching and patient care activities of the academic medical center. Sharing a commitment to superior quality, academic excellence and patient safety, the organizations within Northwestern Medicine comprise more than 9,000 clinical and administrative staff, 3,100 medical and science faculty and 700 students. The entities involved in Northwestern Medicine remain separate organizations. Northwestern Medicine is a trademark of Northwestern Memorial HealthCare and is used by Northwestern University.

About Northwestern Memorial Hospital

Northwestern Memorial is one of the country's premier academic medical center hospitals and is the primary teaching hospital of the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. Along with its Prentice Women's Hospital and Stone Institute of Psychiatry, the hospital has 1,705 affiliated physicians and 6,769 employees. Northwestern Memorial is recognized for providing exemplary patient care and state-of-the art advancements in the areas of cardiovascular care; women's health; oncology; neurology and neurosurgery; solid organ and soft tissue transplants and orthopaedics.

Northwestern Memorial has nursing Magnet Status, the nation's highest recognition for patient care and nursing excellence. Northwestern Memorial ranks 10th in the nation in the U.S. News & World Report 2014-15 Honor Roll of America's Best Hospitals. The hospital is recognized in 14 of 16 clinical specialties rated by U.S. News and is No. 1 in Illinois and Chicago in U.S. News' 2014-15 state and metro rankings, respectively. For 14 years running, Northwestern Memorial has been rated among the "100 Best Companies for Working Mothers" guide by Working Mother magazine. The hospital is a recipient of the prestigious National Quality Health Care Award and has been chosen by Chicagoans as the Consumer Choice according to the National Research Corporation's annual survey for 15 consecutive years.



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