Public Release:  Noninvasive advanced image analysis could lead to better patient care

Lung cancer patients could especially benefit from new 'QTA' technique

The Translational Genomics Research Institute

PHOENIX, Ariz. -- July 2, 2014 -- Lung cancer patients could receive more precise treatment, and their progress could be better tracked, using a new high-tech method of non-invasive medical imaging analysis, according to a study published today by the journal PLOS ONE.

Genetic changes increasingly are recognized as driving cancer development. But obtaining evidence of these changes usually requires a biopsy, which can be problematic for sensitive regions of the body such as the lungs.

Based on a review of 48 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the study found that by scanning their tumor cells using "quantitative computed tomography based texture analysis" (QTA), researchers could determine -- with nearly 90 percent accuracy -- whether the patient's tumor had a cancer-causing K-ras gene mutation.

The study was led by investigators at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare, and Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA).

NSCLC represents more than 85 percent of all lung cancers, which will kill an estimated 159,000 Americans this year, making it the leading cause of cancer-related death. It has a five-year survival rate less than 10 percent.

QTA was shown to be an accurate -- and non-invasive -- alternative to surgical biopsy and other invasive means of collecting and analyzing biological samples, the study said. This method of making genomic distinctions may help physicians determine the best type of treatment to administer to each patient.

"The ability to rapidly and non-invasively characterize NSCLC tumors would be a great asset to clinical oncologists," said Dr. Glen Weiss, the study's lead author, Director of Clinical Research and Medical Oncologist at Cancer Treatment Centers of America's Western Regional Medical Center in Phoenix, and a Clinical Associate Professor in TGen's Cancer and Cell Biology Division.

"QTA applied to molecularly defined NSCLC cases may have a broader application to precision medicine by offering a non-invasive way of identifying the best therapies for each patient," said Dr. Weiss.

Dr. Ronald Korn, Medical Director of Scottsdale Healthcare's Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center and the study's senior author, described QTA as a substantial step forward in the use of medical imaging: "Non-invasive characterization of a tumor's molecular features could enhance treatment management. Non-invasive QTA can differentiate the presence of K-ras mutation from pan-wildtype NSCLC."

Dr. Korn also is CEO and Medical Director of Imaging Endpoints, a leading imaging core lab that provides centralized image handling and advanced image interpretations for clinical trials. Through Scottsdale Healthcare Research Institute, and in collaboration with Imaging Endpoints Core Lab, this team has developed one of the only global radiology research laboratories that specializes in rapid detection and assessment of response (also known as the RADAR program).

"Although, more studies are needed to move our RADAR program forward towards routine medical use, our core lab remains focused upon characterizing tumors non-invasively through imaging and then using these technologies to help determine, as soon as possible, whether cancer treatments are working, sometimes within days to weeks after the start of therapy" said Dr. Korn.

Dr. Weiss said future studies using QTA also could help identify other genomic sub-types of NSCLC.

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This study, Noninvasive Image Texture Analysis Differentiates K-ras Mutation from Pan-Wildtype NSCLC and is Prognostic, was supported by the TGen Foundation, the Scottsdale Healthcare Foundation, the Flinn Foundation, and the United Kingdom Department of Health. Sequenom Inc. provided the LungCarta Panel test analysis.

About the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare

The Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare in Scottsdale, Ariz. offers comprehensive cancer treatment and research through clinical trials, diagnosis, treatment, prevention and support services in collaboration with leading scientific researchers and community oncologists. The Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare, Scottsdale Healthcare Research Institute, Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn Medical Center, Scottsdale Healthcare Shea Medical Center and Scottsdale Healthcare Thompson Peak Hospital and related entities are part of the non-profit Scottsdale Lincoln Health Network. For more information, visit: http://www.shc.org.

Press Contact:
Kaitlan Schick
Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare
480-323-1384
kaitlan.schick@jcl.com

About Cancer Treatment Centers of America®

Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Inc. (CTCA) is a national network of five hospitals that focus on the treatment of complex and advanced-stage cancer. CTCA offers a comprehensive, fully integrative approach to cancer treatment and serves patients from all 50 states at facilities located in Atlanta, Chicago, Philadelphia, Phoenix and Tulsa. Known for delivering the Mother Standard® of care and Patient Empowerment Medicine®, CTCA provides patients with information about cancer and their treatment options so they can control their treatment decisions. For more information about CTCA, visit http://www.cancercenter.com.

Press Contact:
Nicole McTheny
Director, Public Affairs
Cancer Treatment Centers of America®
14200 W. Celebrate Life Way, Goodyear, AZ 85338
O: (623) 207-3983
C: (602) 339-1569
Nicole.McTheny@ctca-hope.com

About Imaging Endpoints

Imaging Endpoints is a full-service imaging contract research organization providing services to the pharmaceutical, biotech and medical device industries to accelerate their national and international clinical trials. Extensive expertise in imaging allows Imaging Endpoints to perform real-time qualitative and quantitative assessments of both anatomic and physiologic/metabolic imaging modalities in order to better probe the effectiveness of new therapeutics. In addition to its expertise in oncology, Imaging Endpoints has expertise in neurological, musculoskeletal and cardiovascular radiologic sciences, and experience in all phases of clinical trials from preclinical through Phase III and post-market studies. QTA is exclusively available through Imaging Endpoints Core Lab and has been used in analysis of solid tumors such as colorectal cancers, pancreas cancers, lung cancers, prostate cancers and breast cancers. For more information about Imaging Endpoints' suite of services, visit http://www.imagingendpoints.com.

About TGen

Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with cancer, neurological disorders and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit). TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: http://www.tgen.org.

Press Contact:
Steve Yozwiak
TGen Senior Science Writer
602-343-8704
syozwiak@tgen.org

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