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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
17-Jul-2014

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Contact: Anita Srikameswaran
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University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences
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Pitt-led study suggests cystic fibrosis is 2 diseases, 1 doesn't affect lungs

PITTSBURGH, July 17, 2014 Cystic fibrosis (CF) could be considered two diseases, one that affects multiple organs including the lungs, and one that doesn't affect the lungs at all, according to a multicenter team led by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. The research, published online today in PLOS Genetics, showed that nine variants in the gene associated with cystic fibrosis can lead to pancreatitis, sinusitis and male infertility, but leave the lungs unharmed.

People with CF inherit from each parent a severely mutated copy of a gene called CFTR, which makes a protein that forms a channel for the movement of chloride molecules in and out of cells that produce sweat, mucus, tears, semen and digestive enzymes, said co-senior investigator David Whitcomb, M.D., Ph.D., chief of gastroenterology, hepatology and nutrition, Pitt School of Medicine. Without functional CFTR channels, secretions become thick and sticky, causing problems such as the chronic lung congestion associated with CF.

"There are other kinds of mutations of CFTR, but these were deemed to be harmless because they didn't cause lung problems," Dr. Whitcomb said. "We examined whether these variants could be related to disorders of the pancreas and other organs that use CFTR channels."

Co-senior author Min Goo Lee, M.D., Ph.D., of Yonsei University College of Medicine in Seoul, Korea, conducted careful tests of CFTR in pancreatic cell models and determined that a molecular switch inside the cell called WINK1 made CFTR channels secrete bicarbonate rather than chloride molecules.

"Pancreas cells use CFTR to secrete bicarbonate to neutralize gastric acids," Dr. Whitcomb said. "When that doesn't happen, the acids cause the inflammation, cyst formation and scarring of severe pancreatitis."

The research team found nine CFTR gene variants associated with pancreatitis after testing nearly 1,000 patients with the disease and a comparable number of healthy volunteers. They also learned that each variant could impair the WINK1 switch to prevent CFTR from becoming a bicarbonate-secreting channel.

Co-senior author Ivet Bahar, Ph.D., Distinguished Professor and John K. Vries Chair of Computational Biology, Pitt School of Medicine, built a computer model of the CFTR protein's structure and determined that all the nine variants alter the area that forms the bicarbonate transport channel, thus impairing secretion of the molecule.

"It turns out that CFTR-mediated bicarbonate transport is critical to thin mucus in the sinuses and for proper sperm function," Dr. Whitcomb said. "When we surveyed pancreatitis patients, there was a subset who said they had problems with chronic sinusitis. Of men over 30 who said they had tried to have children and were infertile, nearly all had one of these nine CFTR mutations."

He added that identification of the mechanisms that cause the conditions make it possible to develop treatments, as well as to launch trials to determine if medications that are used by CF patients might have some benefit for those who do not have lung disease, but who carry the other mutations.

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The team includes researchers from the University of Pittsburgh, the Mayo Clinic, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and many other institutions that are part of the North American Pancreatitis Study Group.

The study was supported by National Institutes of Health grants DK061451, DK062420, GM086238, DK063922, CA047904 and RR024153; the Ministry for Health & Welfare, Republic of Korea; and Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Seoul.

About the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

As one of the nation's leading academic centers for biomedical research, the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine integrates advanced technology with basic science across a broad range of disciplines in a continuous quest to harness the power of new knowledge and improve the human condition. Driven mainly by the School of Medicine and its affiliates, Pitt has ranked among the top 10 recipients of funding from the National Institutes of Health since 1998. In rankings recently released by the National Science Foundation, Pitt ranked fifth among all American universities in total federal science and engineering research and development support.

Likewise, the School of Medicine is equally committed to advancing the quality and strength of its medical and graduate education programs, for which it is recognized as an innovative leader, and to training highly skilled, compassionate clinicians and creative scientists well-equipped to engage in world-class research. The School of Medicine is the academic partner of UPMC, which has collaborated with the University to raise the standard of medical excellence in Pittsburgh and to position health care as a driving force behind the region's economy. For more information about the School of Medicine, see http://www.medschool.pitt.edu.

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Contact: Anita Srikameswaran
Phone: 412-578-9193
E-mail: SrikamAV@upmc.edu

Contact: Courtney McCrimmon
Phone: 412-586-9773
E-mail: McCrimmonCP@upmc.edu



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