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PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
14-Aug-2014

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Contact: Jeremy Moore
jeremy.moore@aacr.org
215-446-7109
American Association for Cancer Research
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NSAIDs may lower breast cancer recurrence rate in overweight and obese women

PHILADELPHIA Recurrence of hormone-related breast cancer was cut by half in overweight and obese women who regularly used aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), according to data published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

"Our studies suggest that limiting inflammatory signaling may be an effective, less toxic approach to altering the cancer-promoting effects of obesity and improving patient response to hormone therapy," said Linda A. deGraffenried, PhD, associate professor of nutritional sciences at The University of Texas in Austin.

The study found that women whose body mass index (BMI) was greater than 30 and had estrogen receptor alpha (ERα)-positive breast cancer had a 52 percent lower rate of recurrence and a 28-month delay in time to recurrence if they were taking aspirin or other NSAIDs.

"These results suggest that NSAIDs may improve response to hormone therapy, thereby allowing more women to remain on hormone therapy rather than needing to change to chemotherapy and deal with the associated side effects and complications," said deGraffenried. "However, these results are preliminary and patients should never undertake any treatment without consulting with their physician."

Using blood from obese patients, deGraffenried and colleagues conducted experiments in the laboratory to recreate a tumor environment containing cancer cells, fat cells, and the immune cells that promote inflammation. They found that the factors associated with obesity initiate a network of signaling within the tumor environment to promote growth and resistance to therapy.

"These studies show that the greatest benefit from aspirin [and other NSAIDs] will be in those with a disease driven by inflammation, and not just obesity," explained DeGraffenried.

Researchers used data from 440 women diagnosed with invasive, ERα-positive breast cancer and treated at The University of Texas Health Science Center and the START Center for Cancer Care clinic, both in San Antonio, Texas, between 1987 and 2011.

Of the women studied, 58.5 percent were obese and 25.8 percent were overweight. About 81 percent took aspirin, and the rest took another NSAID. About 42 percent and 25 percent took statins and omega-3 fatty acid, respectively.

There was an indication of protection from aspirin and other NSAIDs even after controlling for statins and omega-3 fatty acid use, which also have anti-inflammatory effects.

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This study was funded by the U.S. Department of Defense, the Breast Cancer Research Program of the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs, and the National Cancer Institute. DeGraffenried declares no conflicts of interest.

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About the American Association for Cancer Research Founded in 1907, the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) is the world's oldest and largest professional organization dedicated to advancing cancer research and its mission to prevent and cure cancer. AACR membership includes more than 34,000 laboratory, translational, and clinical researchers; population scientists; other health care professionals; and cancer advocates residing in more than 90 countries. The AACR marshals the full spectrum of expertise of the cancer community to accelerate progress in the prevention, biology, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer by annually convening more than 20 conferences and educational workshops, the largest of which is the AACR Annual Meeting with more than 18,000 attendees. In addition, the AACR publishes eight peer-reviewed scientific journals and a magazine for cancer survivors, patients, and their caregivers. The AACR funds meritorious research directly as well as in cooperation with numerous cancer organizations. As the Scientific Partner of Stand Up To Cancer, the AACR provides expert peer review, grants administration, and scientific oversight of team science and individual grants in cancer research that have the potential for near-term patient benefit. The AACR actively communicates with legislators and policymakers about the value of cancer research and related biomedical science in saving lives from cancer. For more information about the AACR, visit http://www.AACR.org.



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