Public Release:  Satellite shows Hurricane Marie about to swallow Karina

NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

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IMAGE: This image from NOAA's GOES-West satellite on Aug. 26 at 8 a.m. EDT shows Karina, now a tropical depression, being swept into Marie's circulation where it is expected to be... view more

Credit: Image Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project

Massive Hurricane Marie appears like a giant fish about to swallow tiny Tropical Depression Karina on satellite imagery today from NOAA's GOES-West satellite. Karina, now a tropical depression is being swept into Marie's circulation where it is expected to be eaten, or absorbed.

An image from NOAA's GOES-West satellite on Aug. 26 at 8 a.m. EDT shows Karina being drawn into the powerful and large circulation of Hurricane Marie to the east of the depression. The image was created by NASA/NOAA's GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

Forecasters at the National Hurricane Center noted that although deep convection could re-develop today, increasing easterly wind shear associated with the outflow of Hurricane Marie should make it difficult for any thunderstorm development to keep going.

At 11 a.m. EDT on August 26, Karina's maximum sustained winds dropped to 30 mph (45 kph) and was weakening. Karina was centered near latitude 16.6 north and longitude 127.3 west, about 1,210 miles (1,950 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico. Karina is moving toward the southeast at 6 mph (9 kph).

Karina is expected to degenerate into a trough (elongated area) of low pressure and rotate around the southern portion of the large circulation of Hurricane Marie over the next day until it is absorbed by Marie.

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Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

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