[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
4-Aug-2014

[ | E-mail ] Share Share

Contact: Shantell Kirkendoll
smkirk@umich.edu
734-764-2220
The JAMA Network Journals
www.twitter.com/JAMA_current

Medical consultations for surgical patients examined amid payment changes

The use of medical consultations for surgical patients varied widely across hospitals, especially among patients without complications, in a study of Medicare beneficiaries undergoing colectomy (to remove all or part of their colon) or total hip replacement (THR).

Internists and medical subspecialists are frequently called on to assess surgical patients and to help manage their care. As payers move toward bundled payments, hospitals need to better understand variations in practice and resources used during patient care.

The authors examined hospital medical consultations for surgical patients, the factors that influenced their use and practice variation across hospitals. The study used Medicare claims data for 91,684 patients who underwent colectomy at 930 hospitals and 339,319 patients who had THR at 1,589 hospitals from 2007 through 2010.

More than half of the patients undergoing colectomy or THR (69 percent and 63 percent, respectively) had at least one medical consultation while hospitalized. The median number of consult visits was nine for colectomy patients and three for THR. Hospital variation in the use of medical consultations was greater for colectomy patients without complications (47 percent 79 percent) vs. among those with complications (90 percent 95 percent). Hospital variation was similar for THR (36 percent 87 percent among patients without complications vs. 89 percent 94 percent among those with complications). Nonteaching and for-profit hospitals had greater use of medical consultations for colectomy patients and larger hospitals had greater use of consultations for THR patients.

"Medical consultations are a common component of episodes of inpatient surgical care. Our findings of wide variation in medical consultation use particularly among patients without complications suggest that understanding when medical consultations provide value will be important as hospitals seek to increase their efficiency under bundled payments."

In a related commentary, Gulshan Sharma, M.D., M.P.H., of the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, writes: "Over the past 20 years, the role of the medical consultant for surgical patients has transformed substantially, from consultant to comanager."

"While medical consultation has many anticipated benefits, there are downsides as well, including the potential for confusion when multiple opinions are sought; the challenge of decision making when multiple decision makers are included; lack of ownership when problem arises; and the costs associated with soliciting additional input," he continues.

"There is no one fit for all. Decisions on routine use of medical consultation for highly reimbursed procedures should be driven by institutional data on quality and cost," Sharma concludes.

###

Author: Lena M. Chen, M.D., M.S., of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and colleagues.

JAMA Intern Med. Published online August 4, 2014. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2014.3376.

An author made a conflict of interest disclosure. This work was supported by funding from the National Institute of Aging and a University of Michigan MCubed grant. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

JAMA Intern Med. Published online August 4, 2014. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2014.1499.

Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.



[ Back to EurekAlert! ] [ | E-mail Share Share ]

 


AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.