[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
28-Aug-2014

[ | E-mail ] Share Share

Contact: Steve Yozwiak
syozwiak@tgen.org
602-343-8704
The Translational Genomics Research Institute

TGen receives approval for patient enrollment in brain cancer clinical trial

Glioblastoma pilot trial funded by Ivy Foundation

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -- Aug. 28, 2014 -- In 2012, The Ben & Catherine Ivy Foundation awarded $10 million in grants for two groundbreaking brain cancer research projects at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen). One of those projects has officially received the final regulatory approval from University of California, San Francisco, which means patient enrollment for the trial can begin.

In the $5 million project, "Genomics Enabled Medicine in Glioblastoma Trial," TGen and its clinical partners will lead first-in-patient clinical trial studies that will test promising new drugs that might extend the survival of GBM patients. This multi-part study will take place in clinics across the country and TGen laboratories.

"GBM is one of the top three fastest-killing cancers out there and it affects people of all ages," said Catherine (Bracken) Ivy, founder and president of The Ben & Catherine Ivy Foundation. "It is critical that we fund research that will help patients live longer so we can study and treat brain cancer."

The project begins with a pilot study of 15 patients, using whole genome sequencing to study their tumor samples to help physicians determine what drugs might be most beneficial.

To support molecularly informed clinical decisions, TGen labs also will examine genomic data from at least 536 past cases of glioblastoma, as well as tumor samples from new cases, developing tools that will produce more insight into how glioblastoma tumors grow and survive. TGen also will conduct a series of pioneering lab tests to measure cell-by-cell responses to various drugs.

"GBM is a disease that needs answers now, and we strongly believe those answers will be found in the genome," said Dr. David Craig, TGen's Deputy Director of Bioinformatics, Director of TGen's Neurogenomics Division, and one of the projects principal investigators. "Identifying the genes that contribute to the survival of glioblastoma will provide valuable information on how to treat it, and may also lead to an improved understanding of what drives other cancers as well."

To get new treatments to patients as quickly as possible, this five-year study will include a feasibility study involving up to 30 patients, followed by Phase II clinical trials with as many as 70 patients. TGen is teaming with the Ivy Early Phase Clinical Trials Consortium that includes: University of California, San Francisco; University of California, Los Angeles; the MD Anderson Cancer Center; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; University of Utah; and the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center.

The results of these clinical trials should not only help the patients who join them, but also provide the data needed for FDA approval and availability of new drugs that could benefit tens of thousands of brain cancer patients in the future.

"Working with physicians, the project will aim to understand treatment in the context of the tumor's molecular profile. We will have the opportunity to determine when combinations of drugs might be more effective than using a single drug, quickly identify which therapies don't work, and accelerate discovery of ones that might prove promising for future development," said Dr. John Carpten, TGen's Deputy Director of Basic Science, Director of TGen's Integrated Cancer Genomics Division, and another of the project's principal investigators.

In addition to helping patients as quickly as possible, the project should significantly expand Arizona's network of brain cancer experts.

###

About The Ben & Catherine Ivy Foundation

The Ben & Catherine Ivy Foundation, based in Scottsdale, Ariz., was formed in 2005, when Ben Ivy lost his battle with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Since then, the Foundation has contributed more than $50 million to research in gliomas within the United States and Canada, with the goal of better diagnostics and treatments that offer long-term survival and a high quality of life for patients with brain tumors. The Ben & Catherine Ivy Foundation is the largest privately funded foundation of its kind in the United States. For more information, visit http://www.ivyfoundation.org. We have regular updates via social media - please find us on:

Blog: Ivy Foundation
Facebook: Ivy Foundation
Twitter: @IvyFoundation
Google+: Ivy Foundation
https://plus.google.com/115330378249248717618/posts
LinkedIn: Ivy Foundation
YouTube: IvyFoundationGBM

Press Contact:

Beth McRae
The McRae Agency
480-990-0282
beth@mcraeagency.com

About TGen

The Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. Research at TGen is focused on helping patients with diseases such as cancer, neurological disorders and diabetes. TGen is on the cutting edge of translational research where investigators are able to unravel the genetic components of common and complex diseases. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities, TGen believes it can make a substantial contribution to the efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: http://www.tgen.org.

Press Contact:

Steve Yozwiak
TGen Senior Science Writer
602-343-8704
syozwiak@tgen.org



[ Back to EurekAlert! ] [ | E-mail Share Share ]

 


AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.