Public Release:  UH professor named 2014 American Chemical Society Cope Scholar

Award recognizes Olafs Daugulis for excellence in organic chemistry

University of Houston

IMAGE

IMAGE: Olafs Daugulis, associate professor of chemistry at the University of Houston, is one of 10 scientists receiving the 2014 American Chemical Society Arthur C. Cope Scholar Award. The award recognizes... view more

Credit: Chris Watts

HOUSTON, Aug. 5, 2014 - Olafs Daugulis, associate professor of chemistry at the University of Houston (UH), is one of 10 scientists receiving the American Chemical Society (ACS) Arthur C. Cope Scholar Award for 2014. The award recognizes and encourages excellence in organic chemistry.

Cope Scholar Awards, sponsored by the Arthur C. Cope Fund, include a $5,000 award, a certificate, and a $40,000 unrestricted research grant. The citation for Daugulis' award reads: "For the development of transition metal-catalyzed carbon-hydrogen bond functionalization reactions and their practical applications in organic synthesis."

The award recipients will be recognized in August at the Arthur C. Cope Symposium held during the Fall ACS National Meeting in San Francisco. Each recipient will give an address at the symposium; Daugulis' presentation is titled "Regioselective Functionalization of Unreactive C-H Bonds."

"The Cope Scholar Award is the fifth major national/international award Olafs has won," said David Hoffman, UH chemistry department chair. "We're proud to have him as a member of our faculty and to have his excellent work recognized by the American Chemical Society."

Previously, Daugulis received an NSF CAREER award, an Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship, a Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award and the Norman Hackerman Award in Chemical Research. He also won a UH Teaching Award in 2010.

Other Cope Scholars named for 2014 are Richard N. Armstrong, Vanderbilt University; Abigail G. Doyle, Princeton University; Raymond L. Funk, Pennsylvania State University; Seth Herzon, Yale University; Jeffrey N. Johnston, Vanderbilt; Gary E. Keck, University of Utah; Benjamin List, Max Planck Institute for Coal Research, Germany; Hung-wen (Ben) Liu, University of Texas, Austin; and Tomislav Rovis, Colorado State University.

###

Editor's note: Story written by Kathy Major, College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics. High-resolution photo available upon request.

About the University of Houston

The University of Houston is a Carnegie-designated Tier One public research university recognized by The Princeton Review as one of the nation's best colleges for undergraduate education. UH serves the globally competitive Houston and Gulf Coast Region by providing world-class faculty, experiential learning and strategic industry partnerships. Located in the nation's fourth-largest city, UH serves more than 39,500 students in the most ethnically and culturally diverse region in the country. For more information about UH, visit the university's newsroom at http://www.uh.edu/news-events/.

About the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics

The UH College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, with 193 ranked faculty and nearly 6,000 students, offers bachelor's, master's and doctoral degrees in the natural sciences, computational sciences and mathematics. Faculty members in the departments of biology and biochemistry, chemistry, computer science, earth and atmospheric sciences, mathematics and physics conduct internationally recognized research in collaboration with industry, Texas Medical Center institutions, NASA and others worldwide.

To receive UH science news via email, sign up for UH-SciNews at http://www.uh.edu/news-events/mailing-lists/sciencelistserv/index.php.

For additional news alerts about UH, follow us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/UHNewsEvents and Twitter at http://twitter.com/UH_News.

Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.