[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
2-Sep-2014

[ | E-mail ] Share Share

Contact: James Verdier
jverdier@aibs.org
205-286-8626
American Institute of Biological Sciences
@AIBSbiology

Changing microbial dynamics in the wake of the Macondo blowout

The large infusion of marine oil had wide-ranging effects on Gulf of Mexico microbes

In an article in the September issue of BioScience, Samantha Joye and colleagues describe Gulf of Mexico microbial communities in the aftermath of the 2010 Macondo blowout. The authors describe revealing population-level responses of hydrocarbon-degrading microbes to the unprecedented deepwater oil plume.

The spill provided a unique opportunity to study the responses of indigenous microbial communities to a substantial injection of hydrocarbons. Surveys of genetic identifiers within cells known as ribosomal RNA and analyses relying on modern techniques including metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, and other methods revealed quickly changing population sizes and community structures. The presence of oil-degrading microbes, which was determined through the use of ribosomal RNA signatures, was found even after the dissipation of the initial plume, which provides evidence that seed populations persist and may be maintained by natural oil seepage or small accidental leaks.

Perhaps one of the most striking features of the microbial response to the blowout was the rapid formation of large flocs of marine "snow." The flocs were initially observed in the upper water column and constituted the precursors to a massive pulse of oil-derived sediment that settled near the wellhead in the weeks following the accident. The rapid movement of oil to the seafloor in the form of microbe-induced marine snow represents a previously unrecognized outcome for marine hydrocarbons that may have far-reaching implications. The authors performed laboratory simulations of marine oil snow formation and identified several possible microbial mechanisms for the formation of the snow, including the creation of mucus webs through the action of bacterial oil degraders. As a result of their findings, Joye and her colleagues call for the inclusion of marine snow in the federal oil budget, which is intended to describe the fate of discharged oil.

The authors close with a call for additional research. Further study is needed both to increase the understanding of oil-degrading microbes and to quantify the rates at which they may degrade spilled oil.

###

This article is part of a Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative-sponsored Special Section in BioScience.

BioScience, published monthly by Oxford Journals, is the journal of the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS). BioScience is a forum for integrating the life sciences that publishes commentary and peer-reviewed articles. The journal has been published since 1964. AIBS is a meta-level organization for professional scientific societies and organizations that are involved with biology. It represents nearly 160 member societies and organizations. Follow BioScience on Twitter @BioScienceAIBS.

Oxford Journals is a division of Oxford University Press. Oxford Journals publishes well over 300 academic and research journals covering a broad range of subject areas, two-thirds of which are published in collaboration with learned societies and other international organizations. The division been publishing journals for more than a century, and as part of the world's oldest and largest university press, has more than 500 years of publishing expertise behind it. Follow Oxford Journals on Twitter @OxfordJournals.



[ Back to EurekAlert! ] [ | E-mail Share Share ]

 


AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.