Public Release:  Brown marmorated stink bug biology and management options described in open-access article

Entomological Society of America

IMAGE

IMAGE: This is an adult brown marmorated stink bug (Halyomorpha halys). view more

Credit: Ian Grettenberger, Penn State University

The brown marmorated stink bug (Halyomorpha halys) is an invasive, herbivorous insect species that was accidentally introduced to the United States from Asia. First discovered in Allentown, Pennsylvania in 1996, it has since been found in at least 40 states in the U.S. as well as Canada, Switzerland, France, Germany, Italy, and Lichtenstein.

In North America, it has become a major agricultural pest across a wide range of commodities. The insect is capable of eating more than 100 different plant species, and in 2010 it caused $37 million worth of damage to apples alone.

Now a new, open-access article in the Journal of Integrated Pest Management describes available management options for this invasive pest species, as well as information about its origin and spread, its pest status in other invaded regions, descriptions of its life stages and biology, its chemical ecology, and the types of damage it does to various host plants. The authors of the article -- some of the best known experts on the BMSB in North America -- are from the the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, and a number of universities.

Nearly two dozen color photographs of the BMSB and the damage it does to crops are included in the article, along with a list of natural insect enemies that can potentially be used for biological control programs.

"Ultimately, classical biological control using parasitoids native to Asia and conservation biological control to enhance the effectiveness of introduced and indigenous natural enemies may provide the most promising long-term solutions for landscape-level reduction of H. halys populations," the authors wrote.

They also discuss different chemical control options that can be used successfully in integrated pest management programs.

"To return to an integrated approach to managing all pests in the crops affected by H. halys, growers require a more sustainable strategy for chemical control that combines efficient use of insecticides with a better understanding of its biology and behavior," according to the authors.

###

The full article is available at http://www.entsoc.org/PDF/2014/ipm-14-002.pdf.

The Journal of Integrated Pest Management is an open-access, peer-reviewed, extension journal covering the field of integrated pest management. The journal is multi-disciplinary in scope, publishing articles in all pest management disciplines, including entomology, nematology, plant pathology, weed science, and other subject areas. The intended readership for the journal is any professional who is engaged in any aspect of integrated pest management, including, but not limited to, crop producers, individuals working in crop protection, retailers, manufacturers and suppliers of pest management products, educators, and pest control operators.

The journal is published by the Entomological Society of America, the largest organization in the world serving the professional and scientific needs of entomologists and people in related disciplines. Founded in 1889, ESA today has nearly 7,000 members affiliated with educational institutions, health agencies, private industry, and government. Members are researchers, teachers, extension service personnel, administrators, marketing representatives, research technicians, consultants, students, and hobbyists. For more information, visit http://www.entsoc.org.

Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.