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How do snowflakes form? (video)

American Chemical Society

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IMAGE: A huge snowstorm could dump more than two feet of snow all over the East Coast, and that means trillions and trillions of tiny snowflakes. Through advances in crystallography, scientists... view more

Credit: The American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON, Jan 21, 2016 -- A huge snowstorm could dump more than two feet of snow all over the East Coast, and that means trillions and trillions of tiny snowflakes. Through advances in crystallography, scientists have learned a lot about the structure of snowflakes. While they all start pretty much the same, once they start crystallizing, it's true that no two snowflakes are alike. In fact, the number of possible shapes is staggering. Put down the shovel, grab the cocoa and get snowed in with Reactions: https://youtu.be/-6zr2eLpduI.

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