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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 306.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Journal of Experimental Criminology
WSU 'deadly force' lab finds racial disparities in shootings
Participants in an innovative Washington State University study of deadly force were more likely to feel threatened in scenarios involving black people. But when it came time to shoot, participants were biased in favor of black suspects, taking longer to pull the trigger against them than against armed white or Hispanic suspects.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, National Institute of Justice, Office of Naval Research

Contact: Lois James
lois_james@wsu.edu
509-358-7944
Washington State University

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Molecular Psychiatry
Discovery hints at why stress is more devastating for some
Some take stress in stride; others struggle with it, even developing psychiatric disorders. New research at Rockefeller University has identified the molecular origins of this so-called stress gap in mice. The results could contribute to a better understanding of the development of depression and other disorders brought on by stress.

Contact: Zach Veilleux
veillez@rockefeller.edu
212-327-8982
Rockefeller University

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Journal of Addiction Medicine
Cannabis withdrawal symptoms common among adolescents treated for substance use disorder
Although cannabis -- commonly known as marijuana -- is broadly believed to be nonaddictive, a study by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators found that 40 percent of cannabis-using adolescents receiving outpatient treatment for substance use disorder reported experiencing symptoms of withdrawal, which are considered a hallmark of drug dependence.
NIH/National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Contact: Noah Brown
nbrown9@partners.org
617-643-3907
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
ESC Congress 2014
Lancet
The Lancet: European Society of Cardiology Congress 2014 media alert
The Lancet is pleased to announce that two papers will be published to coincide with presentation at the ESC Congress 2014, taking place in Barcelona, Spain, Aug. 30-Sept. 3, 2014.

Contact: Daisy Barton
daisy.barton@lancet.com
44-207-424-4949
The Lancet

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
ESC Congress 2014
Mechanical heart valves increase pregnancy risk
The fact that mechanical heart valves increase risks during and after pregnancy, has been confirmed by data from the ROPAC registry presented for the first time today in an ESC Congress Hot Line session by professor Jolien W. Roos-Hesselink, co-chair with professor Roger Hall of the registry's executive committee. The registry found that 1.4 percent of pregnant women with a mechanical heart valve died and 20 percent lost their baby during pregnancy.

Contact: ESC Press Office
press@escardio.org
34-670-521-210
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
ESC Congress 2014
European Heart Journal
Health structures explain nearly 20 percent of non-adherence to heart failure guidelines
Health structures explain nearly 20 percent of the non-adherence to heart failure guidelines, according to the results of a joint ESC-OECD study presented today at ESC Congress by professor Aldo Maggioni. Clinical variables explained more than 80 percent of non-adherence.

Contact: ESC Press Office
press@escardio.org
34-670-521-210
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse
NYU study compares consequences of teen alcohol and marijuana use
Alcohol use was more commonly reported to compromise relationships with friends and significant others (e.g., boyfriends); it was also reported to lead to more regret, particularly among females. Marijuana use was more commonly reported to compromise relationships with teachers or supervisors, result in less energy or interest, and result in lower school or job performance.

Contact: Christopher James
christopher.james@nyu.edu
212-998-6876
New York University

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
Surprising new role for calcium in sensing pain
When you accidentally touch a hot oven, you rapidly pull your hand away. Duke researchers have made a surprising discovery in worms about the role of calcium in such pain signaling. They have built a structural model of the molecule that allows calcium ions to pass into a neuron, triggering a signal of pain. These discoveries may help direct new strategies to treat pain in people.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Esther A. and Joseph Klingenstein Fund, Whitehall Foundation, Duke University

Contact: Karl Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
World Water Week
The key to drilling wells with staying power in the developing world
A UNC study found that if local water communities collect fees for repairs and train community members to fix the wells, they can remain in use for decades.
Conrad N. Hilton Foundation

Contact: Johnny Cruz
jcruz@worldvision.org
253-815-2072
World Vision

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
PeerJ
Exceptionally well preserved insect fossils from the Rhône Valley
In Bavaria, the Tithonian Konservat-Lagerstätte of lithographic limestone is well known as a result of numerous discoveries of emblematic fossils from that area (for example, Archaeopteryx). Now, for the first time, researchers have found fossil insects in the French equivalent of these outcrops -- discoveries which include a new species representing the oldest known water treader.

Contact: Nel Andre
anel@mnhn.fr
PeerJ

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
ESC Congress 2014
ROCKET AF trial suggests that digoxin increases risk of death in AF patients
Digoxin may increase the risk of death in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) by approximately 20 percent, according to results from the ROCKET AF trial presented at ESC Congress today by Dr. Manesh Patel, director of interventional cardiology and catheterisation labs at Duke University Health System in Durham, N.C., US. The findings suggest that caution may be needed when using digoxin in complex AF patients but further studies are needed to confirm the observations.

Contact: ESC Press Office
press@escardio.org
34-670-521-210
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
ESC Congress 2014
European Heart Journal
Simple awareness campaign in general practice identifies new cases of AF
A simple awareness campaign in general practice identifies new cases of atrial fibrillation (AF), according to research presented at ESC Congress today by professor Jean-Marc Davy from France.

Contact: ESC Press Office
press@escardio.org
34-670-521-210
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
Single laser stops molecular tumbling motion instantly
In the quantum world, making the simple atom behave is one thing, but making the more complex molecule behave is another story. Now Northwestern University scientists have figured out an elegant way to stop a molecule from tumbling so that its potential for new applications, such as quantum computing, can be harnessed: shine a single laser on a trapped molecule and it instantly cools to the temperature of outer space, stopping the rotation of the molecule.
US Air Force Office of Scientific Research, National Science Foundation, David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
ESC Congress 2014
Coffee increases prediabetes risk in susceptible young adults
Coffee increases the risk of prediabetes in young adults with hypertension who are slow caffeine metabolisers, according to results from the HARVEST study presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Lucio Mos from Italy. People who drank more than three cups of coffee per day doubled their risk of prediabetes.

Contact: ESC Press Office
press@escardio.org
34-670-521-210
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
PeerJ
Researchers find Asian camel crickets now common in US homes
With their long, spiky legs and their propensity for eating anything, including each other, camel crickets are the stuff of nightmares. And now research from North Carolina State University finds that non-native camel cricket species have spread into homes across the eastern United States.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
Journal of Cell Biology
Scientists call for investigation of mysterious cloud-like collections in cells
About 50 years ago, electron microscopy revealed the presence of tiny blob-like structures that form inside cells, move around and disappear. But scientists still don't know what they do -- even though these shifting cloud-like collections of proteins are believed to be crucial to the cell, and therefore could offer a new approach to disease treatment. Now, researchers are issuing a call to investigators to focus their attention on the role of these formations.
Burroughs Wellcome Clinical Scientist Award in Translational Research, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karen Teber
km463@georgetown.edu
Georgetown University Medical Center

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Faster, cheaper tests for sickle cell
Harvard scientists have developed a new test for sickle cell disease that provides results in just 12 minutes and costs as little as 50 cents -- far faster and cheaper than other tests.

Contact: Peter Reuell
preuell@fas.harvard.edu
617-496-8070
Harvard University

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
Zooming in for a safe flight
Bats emit ultrasound pulses and measure the echoes reflected from their surroundings. They have an extremely flexible internal navigation system that enables them to do this. A study published in Nature Communications shows that when a bat flies close to an object, the number of active neurons in the part of a bat's brain responsible for processing acoustic information about spatial positioning increases. This information helps bats to react quickly and avoid obstacles.
German Research Foundation

Contact: Barbara Wankerl
barbara.wankerl@tum.de
49-892-892-2562
Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
PhytoKeys
Week-long meeting on naming algae, fungi, and plants recorded for posterity
The XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne, Australia in 2011 included a week-long meeting of 200 of the world's experts on naming algae, fungi, and plants. Key results were that new scientific names could be published in electronic-only journals and that English could be used instead of Latin for formal descriptions of species new to science. The official, detailed record of this meeting has been published as a forum paper in the open-access journal PhytoKeys.

Contact: Christina Flann
christinaflann@gmail.com
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
JAMA Pediatrics
Family dinners good for teens' mental health, could protect from cyberbullying
Cyberbullying was associated with mental health and substance use problems in adolescents but family dinners may help protect teens from the consequences of cyberbullying and also be beneficial for their mental health.

Contact: Frank J. Elgar
frank.elgar@mcgill.ca
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
JAMA Internal Medicine
Quality of US diet improves, gap widens for quality between rich and poor
The quality of the US diet showed some modest improvement in the last decade in large measure because of a reduction in the consumption of unhealthy trans fats, but the gap in overall diet quality widened between the rich and the poor.

Contact: Marjorie Dwyer
mhdwyer@hsph.harvard.edu
617-432-8416
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
JAMA Internal Medicine
Research letter: Viewers ate more while watching Hollywood action flick on TV
Television shows filled with action and sound may be bad for your waistline. TV viewers ate more M&Ms, cookies, carrots and grapes while watching an excerpt from a Hollywood action film than those watching an interview program.

Contact: Melissa Osgood
mmo59@cornell.edu
607-255-2059
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Ride-sharing could cut cabs' road time by 30 percent
Analysis suggests ride-sharing could cut taxis' road time by 30 percent.

Contact: Andrew Carleen
acarleen@mit.edu
617-253-1682
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
JAMA Internal Medicine
Quality of US diet shows modest improvement, but overall remains poor
Dietary quality in the US has improved steadily in recent years -- spurred in large part by reduced trans fat intake -- but overall dietary quality remains poor and disparities continue to widen among socioeconomic and racial/ethnic groups, according to a new study from Harvard School of Public Health.

Contact: Marge Dwyer
mhdwyer@hsph.harvard.edu
617-432-8416
Harvard School of Public Health

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
Journal of the American College of Cardiology
Location of body fat can increase hypertension risk
People with fat around their abdominal area are at greater risk of developing hypertension when compared to those with similar body mass index but fat concentrations elsewhere on the body, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Contact: Rachel Cagan
rcagan@acc.org
202-375-6395
American College of Cardiology

Showing releases 1-25 out of 306.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>