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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 365.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
Journal of Cell Biology
Scientists call for investigation of mysterious cloud-like collections in cells
About 50 years ago, electron microscopy revealed the presence of tiny blob-like structures that form inside cells, move around and disappear. But scientists still don't know what they do -- even though these shifting cloud-like collections of proteins are believed to be crucial to the cell, and therefore could offer a new approach to disease treatment. Now, researchers are issuing a call to investigators to focus their attention on the role of these formations.
Burroughs Wellcome Clinical Scientist Award in Translational Research, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karen Teber
km463@georgetown.edu
Georgetown University Medical Center

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
Zooming in for a safe flight
Bats emit ultrasound pulses and measure the echoes reflected from their surroundings. They have an extremely flexible internal navigation system that enables them to do this. A study published in Nature Communications shows that when a bat flies close to an object, the number of active neurons in the part of a bat's brain responsible for processing acoustic information about spatial positioning increases. This information helps bats to react quickly and avoid obstacles.
German Research Foundation

Contact: Barbara Wankerl
barbara.wankerl@tum.de
49-892-892-2562
Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
PhytoKeys
Week-long meeting on naming algae, fungi, and plants recorded for posterity
The XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne, Australia in 2011 included a week-long meeting of 200 of the world's experts on naming algae, fungi, and plants. Key results were that new scientific names could be published in electronic-only journals and that English could be used instead of Latin for formal descriptions of species new to science. The official, detailed record of this meeting has been published as a forum paper in the open-access journal PhytoKeys.

Contact: Christina Flann
christinaflann@gmail.com
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
Journal of Cell Biology
A nucleotide change could initiate fragile X syndrome
Researchers reveal how the alteration of a single nucleotide -- the basic building block of DNA -- could initiate fragile X syndrome, the most common inherited form of intellectual disability.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Empire State Stem Cell Fund, Starr Tri-Institutional Stem Cell Initiative

Contact: Rita Sullivan King
news@rupress.org
212-327-8603
Rockefeller University Press

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
Nature Medicine
A new way to diagnose malaria
A research team from the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology has developed a technique that can detect malarial parasite's waste in infected blood cells.
Singapore National Research Foundation

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
Nature Neuroscience
Memory and Alzheimer's: Towards a better comprehension of the dynamic mechanisms
A study just published in the prestigious Nature Neuroscience journal by, Sylvain Williams, Ph.D., and his team, of the Research Centre of the Douglas Mental Health University Institute and McGill University, opens the door towards better understanding of the neural circuitry and dynamic mechanisms controlling memory as well of the role of an essential element of the hippocampus -- a sub-region named the subiculum.

Contact: Florence Meney
florence.meney@douglas.mcgill.ca
Douglas Mental Health University Institute

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied
Why plants in the office make us more productive
'Green' offices with plants make staff happier and more productive than 'lean' designs stripped of greenery, new research shows.

Contact: Eleanor Gaskarth
e.f.gaskarth@exeter.ac.uk
44-782-730-9332
University of Exeter

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
Metabolomics
Scientists develop 'electronic nose' for rapid detection of C. diff infection
Research from the University of Leicester sniffs out the smell of disease in feces.

Contact: Paul Monks
psm7@le.ac.uk
44-116-252-2141
University of Leicester

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
Nature Climate Change
Changing global diets is vital to reducing climate change
Healthier diets and reducing food waste are part of a combination of solutions needed to ensure food security and avoid dangerous climate change, say the team behind a new study.

Contact: Fred Lewsey
fred.lewsey@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-122-376-5566
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
BMJ Open
Sugar substance 'kills' good HDL cholesterol, new research finds
Scientists at the University of Warwick have discovered that 'good' cholesterol is turned 'bad' by a sugar-derived substance. The substance, methylglyoxal -- MG, was found to damage 'good' HDL cholesterol, which removes excess levels of bad cholesterol from the body.
British Heart Foundation

Contact: Tom Frew
a.t.frew@warwick.ac.uk
44-024-767-75910
University of Warwick

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
Lancet Infectious Diseases
New tuberculosis blood test in children is reliable and highly specific
A new blood test provides a fast and accurate tool to diagnose tuberculosis in children, a new proof-of-concept study shows. The newly developed test is the first reliable immunodiagnostic assay to detect active tuberculosis in children. The test features excellent specificity, a similar sensitivity as culture tests in combination with speed of a blood test. The promising findings are a major advance for the diagnosis of tuberculosis in children, particularly in tuberculosis-endemic regions.
European and Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership, German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, Swiss National Science Foundation

Contact: Klaus Reither
Klaus.Reither@unibas.ch
41-612-848-967
Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
ESC Congress 2014
New method predicts optimal number and location of AEDs
A new method to predict the optimal number and location of automated external defibrillators was presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Benjamin Dahan from France. According to the predictive method, Paris needs 350 AEDs located in public places for optimal prevention of out of hospital cardiac arrest.

Contact: ESC Press Office
press@escardio.org
34-670-521-210
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
ESC Congress 2014
Local anesthetic for TAVI as safe and effective as general anesthetic
Local anesthetic is as safe and effective for transcatheter aortic valve implantation as general anesthetic, according to results of the FRANCE 2 registry presented at the European Society for Cardiology Congress today by Dr Romain Chopard from France.

Contact: ESC Press Office
press@escardio.org
34-670-521-210
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
ESC Congress 2014
Retrievable transcatheter aortic valve effective and safe in real world setting
A retrievable and repositionable transcatheter aortic valve is effective and safe in a real world setting, according to research presented at ESC Congress 2014 today by Dr Stylianos Pyxaras from Germany. The direct flow medical transcatheter aortic valve has unique features that improve operator control and has the potential to improve transcatheter aortic valve implantation outcomes in patients with severe aortic stenosis.

Contact: ESC Press Office
press@escardio.org
34-670-521-210
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
ESC Congress 2014
Batteryless cardiac pacemaker is based on automatic wristwatch
A new batteryless cardiac pacemaker based on an automatic wristwatch and powered by heart motion was presented at ESC Congress 2014 today by Adrian Zurbuchen from Switzerland. The prototype device does not require battery replacement.

Contact: ESC Press Office
press@escardio.org
34-670-521-210
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
ESC Congress 2014
European Heart Journal
AF mortality and morbidity high at 1 year despite good anticoagulant use
Mortality and morbidity of atrial fibrillation (AF) patients remains high at one year despite good use of oral anticoagulants, according to the one year follow-up of the Atrial Fibrillation General Pilot Registry. The findings were presented for the first time at ESC Congress 2014 today by registry chairperson professor Gregory Lip.

Contact: ESC Press Office
press@escardio.org
34-670-521-210
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
Doctor revalidation needs to address 7 key issues for success, claims report
New research launched in the UK today, Sept. 1, 2014, has concluded that there are seven key issues that need to be addressed to ensure the future success of doctor revalidation, the most profound revision in medical regulation since the Medical Act of 1858.
Health Foundation

Contact: Andrew Gould
andrew.gould@plymouth.ac.uk
University of Plymouth

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
British Journal of General Practice
Invisible blood in urine may indicate bladder cancer
Scientists at the University of Exeter Medical School found that one in 60 people over the age of 60 who had invisible blood in their urine -- identified by their GP testing their urine -- transpired to have bladder cancer. The figure was around half those who had visible blood in their urine -- the best known indicator of bladder cancer. However, it was still higher than figures for other potential symptoms of bladder cancer that warrant further investigation.

Contact: Louise Vennells
l.vennells@exeter.ac.uk
44-139-272-2062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
Scientists get set for simulated nuclear inspection
Some 40 scientists and technicians from around the world will descend on Jordan in November to take part in a simulated on-site inspection of a suspected nuclear test site on the banks of the Dead Sea.

Contact: Michael Bishop
michael.bishop@iop.org
01-179-301-032
Institute of Physics

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
Nature Geoscience
Antarctic sea-level rising faster than global rate
A new study of satellite data from the last 19 years reveals that fresh water from melting glaciers has caused the sea-level around the coast of Antarctica to rise by 2 cm more than the global average of 6 cm.

Contact: Steven Williams
s.williams@soton.ac.uk
44-238-059-2128
University of Southampton

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
Nature
Mixing in star-forming clouds explains why sibling stars look alike
The chemical uniformity of stars in the same cluster is the result of turbulent mixing in the clouds of gas where star formation occurs, according to a study by astrophysicists at UC Santa Cruz. Their results show that even stars that don't stay together in a cluster will share a chemical fingerprint with their siblings which can be used to trace them to the same birthplace.
National Science Foundation, NASA

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-2495
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
Nature
Why sibling stars look alike: Early, fast mixing in star-birth clouds
Early, fast, turbulent mixing of gas within giant molecular clouds -- the birthplaces of stars -- means all stars formed from a single cloud bear the same unique chemical 'tag' or 'DNA fingerprint,' write astrophysicists at University of California, Santa Cruz, reporting on the results of computational simulations in the journal Nature, published online on Aug. 31, 2014. Could such chemical tags help astronomers identify our own Sun's long-lost sibling stars?
National Science Foundation, NASA, University of California High-Performance AstroComputing Center

Contact: Mark Krumholz
mkrumhol@ucsc.edu
510-761-2929
University of California High-Performance AstroComputing Center

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
ESC Congress 2014
JAMA
Inhibiting inflammatory enzyme after heart attack does not reduce risk of subsequent event
In patients who experienced an acute coronary syndrome event -- such as heart attack or unstable angina -- use of the drug darapladib to inhibit the enzyme lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 -- believed to play a role in the development of atherosclerosis -- did not reduce the risk of recurrent major coronary events, according to a study published by JAMA. The study is being released early online to coincide with its presentation at the European Society of Cardiology Congress.

Contact: Jessica Maki
jmaki3@partners.org
617-525-6373
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
Nature
Memory in silent neurons
According to a generally-accepted model of synaptic plasticity, a neuron that communicates with others of the same kind emits an electrical impulse as well as activating its synapses transiently. This electrical pulse, combined with the signal received from other neurons, acts to stimulate the synapses. How is it that some neurons are caught up in the communication interplay even when they are barely connected? This is the chicken-or-egg puzzle of synaptic plasticity that a team at UNIGE is aiming to solve.

Contact: Anthony Holtmaat
anthony.holtmaat@unige.ch
41-223-795-428
Université de Genève

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
Nature
Discovery reveals how bacteria distinguish harmful vs. helpful viruses
Viruses can kill bacterial cells or, under the right circumstances, lend them helpful genes that the bacterium could harness to, say, better attack its own hosts. Experiments at Rockefeller University have now revealed that one type of bacterial immune system can distinguish viral foe from friend, and it does so by watching for one particular cue.

Contact: Zach Veilleux
veillez@rockefeller.edu
212-327-8982
Rockefeller University

Showing releases 1-25 out of 365.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>