Choose Help The Kavli Prize

EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
22-Oct-2014 23:09
US Eastern Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Press Releases

Breaking News

Science Business

Grants, Awards, Books

Meetings

Multimedia

Science Agencies
on EurekAlert!

US Department of Energy

US National Institutes of Health

US National Science Foundation

Calendar

Submit a Calendar Item

Subscribe/Sponsor

Links & Resources

Portals

RSS Feeds

Accessibility Option On

Breaking News
US Department of Energy
US National Institutes of Health
US National Science Foundation


Arabic

Breaking News

Titles Only 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 458.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Current Oncology Reports
Cancer patients should not hesitate to speak with their doctors about dietary supplements
Many cancer patients use dietary supplements such as vitamins, minerals and herbs or other botanicals but often don't tell their doctor. This gap in communication can happen when patients believe that their doctors are indifferent or negative toward their use of these supplements. As a result, patients may find information about dietary supplements from unreliable sources, exposing themselves to unneeded risks. University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston researchers describe a practical patient-centered approach to managing dietary supplement use in cancer care in a review article.

Contact: Donna Ramirez/Lisa Spence
lisa.FisherSpence@edelman.com
713-970-2145
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Astrophysical Journal Letters
NASA-led study sees Titan glowing at dusk and dawn
New maps of Saturn's moon Titan reveal large patches of trace gases shining brightly near the north and south poles. These regions are curiously shifted off the poles, to the east or west, so that dawn is breaking over the southern region while dusk is falling over the northern one.
NASA

Contact: Liz Zubritsky
elizabeth.a.zubritsky@nasa.gov
301-614-5438
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP Satellite team ward off recent space debris threat
Space debris, also known as 'space junk,' is an ongoing real-life concern for teams managing satellites orbiting Earth, including NOAA-NASA's Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership, or Suomi NPP, satellite. It is not unusual for satellites that have the capability of maneuvering to be repositioned to avoid debris or to maintain the proper orbit.
NASA, NOAA

Contact: Audrey Haar
audrey.j.haar@nasa.gov
240-684-0808
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Ecology
Seaweed engineers build crustacean homes; old forests store new nitrogen
In this month's issue of Ecology, invasive seaweed shelters native crustaceans, mature forests store nitrogen in soil, and stream invertebrates aren't eating what we thought they were eating.

Contact: Liza Lester
llester@esa.org
202-833-8773 x211
Ecological Society of America

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
UTMB researchers uncover powerful new class of weapons in the war on cancer
An interdisciplinary team of researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch, and Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University have identified small molecules that can represent a new class of anticancer drugs with a novel target for the treatment of lung cancer. These findings are detailed in Nature Communications. A PCT patent was jointly documented by these two Institutes for the invention.
National Institutes of Health, Emory University, Flight Attendant Medical Research Institute

Contact: Donna Ramirez/Lisa Spence
lisa.FisherSpence@edelman.com
713-970-2145
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias
If you're over 60, drink up: Alcohol associated with better memory
Researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, University of Kentucky, and University of Maryland found that for people 60 and older who do not have dementia, light alcohol consumption during late life is associated with higher episodic memory -- the ability to recall memories of events.

Contact: Donna Ramirez/Lisa Spence
Lisa.FisherSpence@edelman.com
713-970-2145
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Third substantial solar flare in 2 days
The sun erupted with another significant flare today, peaking at 10:28 a.m. EDT on Oct. 22, 2014. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captured images of the event, which occurred in the lower half of the sun. This flare is classified as an X1.6 class flare. X-class flares denote the most extreme flares. This is the third substantial flare from the same region of the sun since Oct. 19.
NASA

Contact: Susan Hendrix
Susan.m.hendrix@nasa.gov
301-286-7745
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Astrophysical Journal Letters
Organic molecules in Titan's atmosphere are intriguingly skewed
While studying the atmosphere on Saturn's moon Titan, scientists discovered intriguing zones of organic molecules unexpectedly shifted away from its north and south poles. These misaligned features seem to defy conventional thinking about Titan's windy atmosphere, which should quickly smear out such off-axis concentrations.

Contact: Charles Blue
cblue@nrao.edu
434-296-0314
National Radio Astronomy Observatory

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Prostate
Finally: A missing link between vitamin D and prostate cancer
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study recently published in the journal Prostate offers compelling evidence that inflammation may be the link between vitamin D and prostate cancer. Specifically, the study shows that the gene GDF-15, known to be upregulated by vitamin D, is notably absent in samples of human prostate cancer driven by inflammation.
American Cancer Society

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
NIST's Cloud Computing Roadmap details research requirements and action plans
NIST has published the final version of the US Government Cloud Computing Technology Roadmap, Volumes I and II. The roadmap focuses on strategic and tactical objectives to support the federal government's accelerated adoption of cloud computing.

Contact: Evelyn Brown
evelyn.brown@nist.gov
301-975-5661
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Review of Scientific Instruments
Strengthening thin-film bonds with ultrafast data collection
When studying extremely fast reactions in ultrathin materials, two measurements are better than one. A new research tool invented by researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University and NIST captures information about both temperature and crystal structure during extremely fast reactions in thin-film materials.

Contact: Michael Baum
michael.baum@nist.gov
301-975-2763
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
ACS Nano
NIST offers electronics industry 2 ways to snoop on self-organizing molecules
The idea of a practical manufacturing process based on getting molecules to organize themselves in useful nanoscale shapes once seemed a little fantastic. Now the day isn't far off when your cell phone may depend on it. Two recent papers by researchers at NIST, MIT and IBM demonstrate complementary approaches to 3-D imaging of nanoscale polymer patterns for use in semiconductor lithography.

Contact: Michael Baum
michael.baum@nist.gov
301-975-2763
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Neuron
Bipolar disorder discovery at the nano level
A nano-sized discovery by Northwestern Medicine scientists helps explain how bipolar disorder affects the brain and could one day lead to new drug therapies to treat the mental illness.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Marie Curie Outgoing Postdoctoral Fellowship

Contact: Erin White
ewhite@northwestern.edu
847-491-4888
Northwestern University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice
No silver bullet: ISU study identifies risk factors of youth charged with murder
News of a school shooting or a homicide involving a teenage suspect always leads to the question of why? It is human nature to want an explanation or someone to blame, and policymakers try to pinpoint a cause in an effort to prevent it from happening again. But too often, the speculation or rush to judgment clouds reality, said Matt DeLisi, a professor of sociology and criminal justice at Iowa State University.

Contact: Matt DeLisi
delisi@iastate.edu
515-294-8008
Iowa State University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Chemical Physical Letters
New insights on carbonic acid in water
A new study by Berkeley Lab researchers provides valuable new insight into aqueous carbonic acid with important implications for both geological and biological concerns.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Science Translational Medicine
A real-time tracking system developed to monitor dangerous bacteria inside the body
Combining a PET scanner with a new chemical tracer that selectively tags specific types of bacteria, Johns Hopkins researchers working with mice report they have devised a way to detect and monitor in real time infections with dangerous Gram-negative bacteria. These increasingly drug-resistant bacteria are responsible for a range of diseases, including fatal pneumonias and various bloodstream or solid-organ infections acquired in and outside the hospital.
National Institutes of Health, Harvard University Center for AIDS Research

Contact: Ekaterina Pesheva
epeshev1@jhmi.edu
410-502-9433
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Finding durable foul-release coatings to control invasive mussel attachment
The Bureau of Reclamation has released a report summarizing six years of testing coatings to control the attachment of quagga and zebra mussels to water and power facilities. Since the study began in 2008, Reclamation has tested more than 100 coatings and materials.
Bureau of Reclaimation

Contact: Peter Soeth
psoeth@usbr.gov
303-445-3615
Bureau of Reclamation

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Journal of Bone & Mineral Research
Paralyzed patients have weaker bones and a higher risk of fractures than expected
People paralyzed by spinal cord injuries lose mechanical strength in their leg bones faster, and more significantly, than previously believed, putting them at greater risk for fractures from minor stresses, according to a study by researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. The results suggest that physicians should begin therapies for such patients sooner to maintain bone mass and strength, and should think beyond standard bone density tests when assessing fracture risk in osteoporosis patients.

Contact: Michael Cohen
mcohen@wpi.edu
508-868-4778
Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Tropical Depression 9 forms in Gulf of Mexico
Tropical Depression 9 formed over the western Bay of Campeche, Gulf of Mexico and is forecast to make a quick landfall on Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's GOES-East Satellite captured the birth of the depression.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
NASA's Terra Satellite sees wind shear affecting Tropical Storm Ana
Tropical Storm Ana was being battered by wind shear when NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead and saw the bulk of showers and thunderstorms pushed north and east of the center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Neuron
New ALS associated gene identified using innovative strategy
Using an innovative exome sequencing strategy, a team of international scientists led by John Landers, PhD, at the University of Massachusetts Medical School has shown that TUBA4A, the gene encoding the Tubulin Alpha 4A protein, is associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a fatal neurological disorder also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease.

Contact: Jim Fessenden
james.fessenden@umassmed.edu
508-856-2000
University of Massachusetts Medical School

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
NASA's TRMM Satellite calculates Hurricanes Fay and Gonzalo rainfall
NASA used TRMM and other satellite data to calculate rainfall from Atlantic hurricanes Fay and Gonzalo.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Optics Letters
New 3-D display technology promises greater energy efficiency
New today in Optics Letters, researchers have devised an ultra-thin LCD screen that operates without a power source, making it a compact, energy-efficient way to display visual information. The technology may one day have applications in products such as e-book readers, flexible displays or as a security measure on credit cards.

Contact: Lyndsay Meyer
lmeyer@osa.org
202-416-1435
The Optical Society

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Baker Institute paper: Data indicate there is no immigration crisis
Is there an 'immigration crisis' on the US-Mexico border? Not according to an examination of historical immigration data, according to a new paper from Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy.

Contact: Jeff Falk
jfalk@rice.edu
713-348-6775
Rice University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
BioScience
Some scientists share better than others
Some scientists share better than others. While astronomers and geneticists embrace the concept, the culture of ecology still has a ways to go. Research by Michigan State University, published in the current issue of BioScience, explores the paradox that although ecologists share findings via scientific journals, they do not share the data on which the studies are built, said Patricia Soranno, MSU fisheries and wildlife professor and co-author of the paper.

Contact: Layne Cameron
layne.cameron@cabs.msu.edu
517-353-8819
Michigan State University

Showing releases 1-25 out of 458.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>