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Showing releases 1-25 out of 285.

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Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Frontiers in Psychology
Picture books aren't just fun
Children hear as much sophisticated information about animals when parents read picture book stories about animals as when they read flashcard-type animal vocabulary books, according to a new study from the University of Waterloo.
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada

Contact: Nick Manning
nmanning@uwaterloo.ca
519-888-4451
University of Waterloo

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Psychological Assessment
WSU researchers tackle 'virtually ignored' psychological study of spite
In spite of spite's large and small impacts, and the obvious power it can hold on the human psyche, it has been 'virtually ignored' by social, personality and clinical psychologists, Marcus said in a recent paper, 'The Psychology of Spite and the Measurement of Spitefulness,' in the journal Psychological Assessment. David Marcus and colleagues have attempted to remedy that oversight by measuring spitefulness with a test similar to those used for other personality traits.

Contact: David Marcus
david.marcus@wsu.edu
509-335-7750
Washington State University

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Journal of Athletic Training
New study finds 2.5 million basketball injuries to high school athletes in 6 seasons
A recently published study by researchers in the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children's Hospital is the first to compare and describe the occurrence and distribution patterns of basketball-related injuries treated in emergency departments and the high school athletic training setting among adolescents and teens.

Contact: Gina Bericchia
MediaRelations@NationwideChildrens.org
614-355-0487
Nationwide Children's Hospital

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
PLOS ONE
Best practices in communication for the animal world
Effective communication is not just about the signaler, according to the study, the receiver also needs to assess the signaler efficiently. For instance, one of the most effective strategies from the perspective of female birds is assessing groups of males called leks, where females can assess multiple males in a short period of time.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Annette Gallagher
a.gallagher1@umiami.edu
305-284-1121
University of Miami

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Eating Behaviors
Biting vs. chewing
There's a new secret to get your child to behave at the dinner table -- cut up their food! This new Cornell study found that when 6- to10-year-old children ate food that they had to bite with their front teeth, chicken on the bone, they were rowdier than when the food had been cut into bite-sized pieces.

Contact: Sandra Cuellar
foodandbrandlab@cornell.edu
607-254-4960
Cornell Food & Brand Lab

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Physicists consider implications of recent revelations about the universe's first light
Recent evidence that the universe expanded from microscopic to cosmic size in a mere instant brings with it important implications. During a live Google Hangout, leading astrophysicists from the University of Chicago and Stanford University discussed what this potential 'crack in the cosmic egg' means for our understanding of the universe.

Contact: James Cohen
cohen@kavlifoundation.org
The Kavli Foundation

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Journal of Neurosurgery
Newly approved brain stimulator offers hope for individuals with uncontrolled epilepsy
A recently FDA-approved device has been shown to reduce seizures in patients with medication-resistant epilepsy by as much as 50 percent. When coupled with an innovative electrode placement planning system developed by physicians at Rush, the device facilitated the complete elimination of seizures in nearly half of the implanted Rush patients enrolled in the decade-long clinical trials.

Contact: Nancy DiFiore
nancy_difiore@rush.edu
312-942-5159
Rush University Medical Center

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Contraception
Risk of pregnancy greater with newer method of female sterilization
The risk of pregnancy among women using a newer method of planned sterilization called hysteroscopic sterilization is more than 10 times greater over a 10-year period than using the more commonly performed laparoscopic sterilization, a study by researchers at Yale University and UC Davis has found.
Society of Family Planning

Contact: Phyllis Brown
phyllis.brown@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9023
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Cell Death & Disease
Scientists pinpoint protein that could improve small cell lung cancer therapies
Approximately 15 percent of all lung cancers are small cell lung cancers, which grow rapidly and often develop resistance to chemotherapy. However, researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center have revealed new insights into the mechanisms leading to this resistance that may lead to improved therapies.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Alaina Schneider
afschneider@vcu.edu
804-628-4578
Virginia Commonwealth University

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Molecular Psychiatry
Depressed? Researchers identify new anti-depressant mechanisms, therapeutic approaches
Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center are making breakthroughs that could benefit people suffering from depression.

Contact: Remekca Owens
remekca.owens@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Journal of Primary Care and Community Health
Clinics not bogged down by red tape can ease health cost burdens
Health clinics that can provide primary care for low-income patients may ease the financial burden on both hospitals and insurance companies while improving patient health, researchers have concluded.

Contact: Matthew Swayne
mls29@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
PLOS Biology
Bioinformatics profiling identifies a new mammalian clock gene
Over 15 mammalian clock proteins have been identified, but researchers surmise there are more. Could big data approaches help find them? To accelerate clock-gene discovery, the investigators used a computer-assisted approach to identify and rank candidate clock components, which they liken to online Netflix-like profiling of movie suggestions for customers. This approach found a new core clock gene, which the team named CHRONO.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
eLife
Scientists identify critical new protein complex involved in learning and memory
Scientists from the Florida campus of the Scripps Research Institute have identified a protein complex that plays a critical but previously unknown role in learning and memory formation.
National Institutes of Health, Spanish Ministry of Education and Science, CONSOLIDER

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
267-337-3859
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Online retailers have clear advantage by not collecting sales tax
Two independent studies use two very different approaches to reach the same conclusion: some online retailers really do have an advantage over traditional brick-and-mortar stores.

Contact: Jeff Grabmeier
Grabmeier.1@osu.edu
614-292-8457
Ohio State University

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New research focuses on streamwater chemistry, landscape variation
Winsor Lowe, interim director of the University of Montana's Wildlife Biology Program, co-wrote a research paper on how streamwater chemistry varies across a headwater stream network.

Contact: Winsor Lowe
winsor.lowe@umontana.edu
406-243-4375
The University of Montana

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
Nanoreporters tell 'sour' oil from 'sweet'
Scientists at Rice University have created a nanoscale detector that checks for and reports on the presence and concentration of hydrogen sulfide in crude oil and natural gas while they're still in the ground.
Advanced Energy Consortium

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
NASA gets 2 last looks at Tropical Cyclone Jack
Tropical Cyclone Jack lost its credentials today, April 22, as it no longer qualified as a tropical cyclone. However, before it weakened, NASA's TRMM satellite took a 'second look' at the storm yesterday.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
7th International Nanotoxicology Congress
PETA science consortium to present hazard testing strategy at nanotoxicology meeting
PETA International Science Consortium will present a non-animal tiered-testing strategy for nanomaterial hazard assessment at the 7th International Nanotoxicology Congress being held in Antalya, Turkey on Apr. 23-26, 2014. The proposed strategy will generate meaningful information on nanomaterial properties and their interaction with biological systems. It's cost-effective, reduces animal use, and can be applied for assessing risk and making intelligent regulatory decisions regarding the use and disposal of nanomaterials.

Contact: Tasgola Bruner
404-907-4172
People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Acta Biomaterialia
Mantis shrimp stronger than airplanes
Inspired by the fist-like club of a mantis shrimp, a team of researchers led by University of California, Riverside, in collaboration with University of Southern California and Purdue University, have developed a design structure for composite materials that is more impact resistant and tougher than the standard used in airplanes.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, National Science Foundation

Contact: Sean Nealon
sean.nealon@ucr.edu
951-827-1287
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Regenerative Medicine
New patenting guidelines are needed for biotechnology
Biotechnology scientists must be aware of the broad patent landscape and push for new patent and licensing guidelines, according to a new paper from Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy.

Contact: Jeff Falk
jfalk@rice.edu
713-348-6775
Rice University

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Journal of Molecular Diagnostics
AMP publishes curriculum recommendations for medical laboratory scientists
The Association for Molecular Pathology released a report today in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics on recommendations for a molecular diagnostics curriculum at both the baccalaureate and master's levels of education.

Contact: Catherine Davidge
cdavidge@amp.org
Association for Molecular Pathology

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Nature Medicine
Neuroimaging: Live from inside the cell
A novel imaging technique provides insights into the role of redox signaling and reactive oxygen species in living neurons, in real time. Scientists of the Technische Universität München and the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München have developed a new optical microscopy technique to unravel the role of 'oxidative stress' in healthy as well as injured nervous systems. The work is reported in the latest issue of Nature Medicine.

Contact: Vera Siegler
vera.siegler@tum.de
49-892-892-2731
Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics
Routine blood glucose measurements can accurately estimate hemoglobin A1c in diabetes
Blood levels of A1c are typically measured every few months in a laboratory, but now researchers have developed a data-based model that accurately estimates A1c using self-monitored blood glucose readings.

Contact: Vicki Cohn
vcohn@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Circulation
Scientists alter fat metabolism in animals to prevent most common type of heart disease
Working with mice and rabbits, Johns Hopkins scientists have found a way to block abnormal cholesterol production, transport and breakdown, successfully preventing the development of atherosclerosis, the main cause of heart attacks and strokes and the number-one cause of death among humans. The condition develops when fat builds inside blood vessels over time and renders them stiff, narrowed and hardened, greatly reducing their ability to feed oxygen-rich blood to the heart muscle and the brain.
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

Contact: Ekaterina Pesheva
epeshev1@jhmi.edu
410-502-9433
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Nano Letters
First size-based chromatography technique for the study of livi
Using nanodot technology, Berkeley Lab researchers demonstrated the first size-based form of chromatography for studying the membranes of living cells. This unique physical approach to probing cellular membrane structures reveals critical information that can't be obtained through conventional microscopy.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Showing releases 1-25 out of 285.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>