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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 364.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 1-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Microbes in Central Park soil: If they can make it there, they can make it anywhere
Soil microbes that thrive in the deserts, rainforests, prairies and forests of the world can also be found living beneath New York City's Central Park, according to a surprising new study led by Colorado State University and the University of Colorado Boulder.

Contact: Noah Fierer
Noah.Fierer@colorado.edu
303-492-5615
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 1-Oct-2014
Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health
Is Australia prepared for Ebola?
Australia needs to be proactive about potential disease outbreaks like Ebola and establish a national center for disease control. In an Editorial in the October issue of Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, Allen Cheng from Monash University and Heath Kelly from the Australian National University question Australia's preparation for public health crises.

Contact: Nicole Weingartner
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
201-748-5808
Wiley

Public Release: 1-Oct-2014
American Sociological Review
Non-citizens face harsher sentencing than citizens in US criminal courts
Non-Americans in the US federal court system are more likely to be sentenced to prison and for longer terms compared to US citizens, according to a new study.

Contact: Daniel Fowler
pubinfo@asanet.org
202-527-7885
American Sociological Association

Public Release: 1-Oct-2014
Cancer Research
Immunotherapy could stop resistance to radiotherapy
Treating cancers with immunotherapy and radiotherapy at the same time could stop them from becoming resistant to treatment.
Cancer Research UK, MedImmune

Contact: Simon Shears
simon.shears@cancer.org.uk
44-203-469-8054
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
CompIMAGE'14
First comprehensive meshfree numerical simulation of skeletal muscle tissue achieved
Engineers at the University of California, San Diego, have completed the first comprehensive numerical simulation of skeletal muscle tissue using a method that uses the pixels in an image as data points for the computer simulation -- a method known as mesh-free simulation. The researchers, led by J.S. Chen, a professor of structural engineering at the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego, presented their findings on the development of this method at the CompIMAGE'14 conference in Pittsburgh this month.

Contact: Ioana Patringenaru
ipatrin@ucsd.edu
858-822-0899
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
NASA's HS3 looks Hurricane Edouard in the eye
NASA and NOAA scientists participating in NASA's Hurricane and Severe Storms Sentinel mission used their expert skills, combined with a bit of serendipity on Sept. 17, 2014, to guide the remotely piloted Global Hawk over the eye of Hurricane Edouard and release a sonde that rotated within the eye as it descended and fell into the eyewall of the storm at low levels.
NASA, NOAA

Contact: Rob Gutro
Robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
301-285-4044
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
NASA's Swift mission observes mega flares from a mini star
On April 23, NASA's Swift satellite detected the strongest, hottest, and longest-lasting sequence of stellar flares ever seen from a nearby red dwarf star. The initial blast from this record-setting series of explosions was as much as 10,000 times more powerful than the largest solar flare ever recorded.
NASA

Contact: Francis Reddy
francis.j.reddy@nasa.gov
301-286-4453
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Annals of Neurology
Researchers show EEG's potential to reveal depolarizations following TBI
The potential for doctors to measure damaging 'brain tsunamis' in injured patients without opening the skull has moved a step closer to reality, thanks to pioneering research at the University of Cincinnati Neuroscience Institute.
Mayfield Education and Research Foundation, US Army's Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury Research Program

Contact: Cindy Starr
513-558-3505
University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
2014 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium
'Virtual breast' could improve cancer detection
Scientists have developed a 'virtual breast' to help train clinicians in the use of ultrasound elastography. The advanced imaging technique holds promise for improving cancer detection, but only if the results are interpreted properly.
National Cancer Institute

Contact: Jennifer Donovan
jbdonova@mtu.edu
906-487-4521
Michigan Technological University

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Ultrafast remote switching of light emission
Researchers from Eindhoven University of Technology can now for the first time remotely control a miniature light source at timescales of 200 trillionth of a second. They published the results on Sept. 2014 in the online journal Nature Nanotechnology. Physicists from the Photonics and Semiconductor Nanophysics group at Eindhoven, under the leadership of prof. Andrea Fiore, have developed a way of remotely controlling the nanoscale light sources at an extremely short timescale. These light sources are needed to be able to transmit quantum information.
NanoNextNL, STW, FOM

Contact: Andrea Fiore
a.fiore@tue.nl
31-402-472-118
Eindhoven University of Technology

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
This week from AGU: Measuring Antarctic ice loss, Indian Ocean program, Oregon landslides
This week from AGU: Measuring Antarctic ice loss, Indian Ocean Program, and Oregon landslides.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
New diagnostic approach for autism in Tanzania
Researchers at Brown University and the University of Georgia have developed and tested an approach for diagnosing autism in Tanzania, where such clinical assessment and intervention services are rare. The assessment battery combines several existing but culturally adapted techniques into a protocol that the researchers tested with 41 children at two Tanzanian sites.
Brown University, National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Rating the planet's oceans
Researchers from UCSB's National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis helped produce the first Ocean Health Index that includes all the Earth's oceans.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
The cultural side of science communication
Do we think of nature as something that we enjoy when we visit a national park and something we need to 'preserve?' Or do we think of ourselves as a part of nature? A bird's nest is a part of nature, but what about a house? The answers to these questions reflect different cultural orientations. They are also reflected in our actions, our speech and in cultural artifacts, according to a new Northwestern University study.

Contact: Hilary Hurd Anyaso
h-anyaso@northwestern.edu
847-491-4887
Northwestern University

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Comprehensive study of allergic deaths in US finds medications are main culprit
Medications are the leading cause of allergy-related sudden deaths in the US, according to an analysis conducted by researchers at Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine . The study, published online today in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, also found that the risk of fatal drug-induced allergic reactions was particularly high among older people and African-Americans and that such deaths increased significantly in the US in recent years.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kim Newman
sciencenews@einstein.yu.edu
718-430-3101
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Nano Letters
Blades of grass inspire advance in organic solar cells
Briseno's research group is one of very few in the world to design and grow organic single-crystal p-n junctions. He says, 'This work is a major advancement in the field of organic solar cells because we have developed what the field considers the 'Holy Grail' architecture for harvesting light and converting it to electricity.' The breakthrough in morphology control should have widespread use in solar cells, batteries and vertical transistors, he adds.

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Nature Immunology
UCI study uncovers important process for immune system development
Research by UC Irvine immunologists reveals new information about how our immune system functions, shedding light on a vital process that determines how the body's ability to fight infection develops.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy & Infectious Diseases, NIH/National Heart, Lung & Blood Institute

Contact: Tom Vasich
tmvasich@uci.edu
949-824-6455
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Medical Care
Medicaid and Uninsured patients obtain new patient appointments most easily at FQHCs
Federally Qualified Health Centers granted new patient appointments to Medicaid beneficiaries and uninsured patients at higher rates than other primary care practices, in addition to charging less for visits, according to results of a new 10-state University of Pennsylvania study published this month in Medical Care.
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Contact: Anna Duerr
anna.duerr@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-8369
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Thyroid
New guidelines for treatment of hypothyroidism endorse current therapy
Levothyroxine is considered the gold standard therapy for an underactive thyroid gland, and a new review of therapies for the condition -- including combining levothyroxine with another agent -- has not altered that assessment, say a team of investigators.Their analysis, published as a set of guidelines in the journal Thyroid (available free online), finds insufficient consistent data exist to recommend a change in use of levothyroxine -- whether generic, or sold under various trade names, such as Synthroid -- as the only drug needed to treat hypothyroidism.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karen Teber
km463@georgetown.edu
Georgetown University Medical Center

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Social Indicators Research
Depression increasing across the country
A study by San Diego State University psychology professor Jean M. Twenge shows Americans are more depressed now than they have been in decades. Analyzing data from 6.9 million adolescents and adults from all over the country, Twenge found that Americans now report more psychosomatic symptoms of depression, such as trouble sleeping and trouble concentrating, than their counterparts in the 1980s.

Contact: Beth Chee
bchee@mail.sdsu.edu
619-594-4563
San Diego State University

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
US military making progress reducing stigma tied to seeking help for mental illness
The US Department of Defense has made progress in reducing the stigma associated with seeking help for mental illnesses such as depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, but more improvement is still needed.

Contact: Lisa Sodders
media@rand.org
310-451-6913
RAND Corporation

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Genes and Development
Disease decoded: Gene mutation may lead to development of new cancer drugs
The discovery of a gene mutation that causes a rare premature aging disease could lead to the development of drugs that block the rapid, unstoppable cell division that makes cancer so deadly

Contact: Laura Bailey
baileylm@umich.edu
734-647-1848
University of Michigan

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Integrative Biology
High-speed drug screen
Massachusetts Institute of Technology engineers have devised a way to rapidly test hundreds of different drug-delivery vehicles in living animals, making it easier to discover promising new ways to deliver a class of drugs called biologics, which includes antibodies, peptides, RNA, and DNA, to human patients.
National Institutes of Health, Packard Award in Science and Engineering, Sanofi Pharmaceuticals, Foxconn Technology Group, Hertz Foundation

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Thyroid
New hypothyroidism treatment guidelines from American Thyroid Association
Levothyroxine (L-T4), long the standard of care for treating hypothyroidism, is effective in most patients, but some individuals do not regain optimal health on L-T4 monotherapy. An expert task force of the American Thyroid Association on thyroid hormone replacement reviewed the latest studies on L-T4 therapy and on alternative treatments to determine whether a change to the current standard of care is appropriate, and they present their recommendations in an article published in Thyroid.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
kryan@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
Dermatology and Therapy
Antioxidant found in grapes uncorks new targets for acne treatment
UCLA researchers have demonstrated how resveratrol, an antioxidant derived from grapes and found in wine, works to inhibit growth of the bacteria that causes acne. The team also found that combining resveratrol with a common acne medication, benzoyl peroxide, may enhance the drug's ability to kill the bacteria and could translate into new treatments.
Women's Dermatologic Society, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Rachel Champeau
rchampeau@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2270
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Showing releases 1-25 out of 364.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>