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Showing releases 1-25 out of 486.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
Cancer Cell
New cancer drug target involving lipid chemical messengers
More than half of human cancers have abnormally upregulated chemical signals related to lipid metabolism, yet how these signals are controlled during tumor formation is not fully understood. Researchers report that TIPE3, a newly described oncogenic protein, promotes cancer by targeting these pathways.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
Nature Photonics
UChicago-Argonne National Lab team improves solar-cell efficiency
New light has been shed on solar power generation using devices made with polymers, thanks to a collaboration between scientists in the University of Chicago's chemistry department, the Institute for Molecular Engineering, and Argonne National Laboratory. Researchers identified a new polymer -- a type of large molecule that forms plastics and other familiar materials -- which improved the efficiency of solar cells.
National Science Foundation, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, US Department of Energy

Contact: Steve Koppes
skoppes@uchicago.edu
773-702-8366
University of Chicago

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
Ecology
Dwindling wind may tip predator-prey balance
Rising temperatures and shifting precipitation patterns may get the lion's share of our climate change attention, but predators may want to give some thought to wind, according to a University of Wisconsin Madison zoologist's study, which is among the first to demonstrate the way 'global stilling' may alter predator-prey relationships.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Brandon Barton
btbarton@wisc.edu
608-262-9226
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
NASA eyes Tropical Storm Fung-Wong move through Northwestern Pacific
Tropical Storm Fung-Wong continued to affect the Philippines while moving north through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. NASA's Aqua satellite provided infrared data on the storm's clouds that showed some high, strong thunderstorms with the potential for heavy rainfall over the northern and central regions of the country. The storm is now expected to affect three more countries over the next several days.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm playing polo with western Mexico
Tropical Storm Polo is riding along the coast of western Mexico like horses in the game of his namesake. NASA's Aqua satellite saw Polo about 300 miles south-southeast of Baja California on its track north.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
NASA, NOAA satellites show Odile's remnant romp through southern US
Former Hurricane Odile may be a bad memory for Baja California, but the remnants have moved over New Mexico and Texas where they are expected to bring rainfall there. NASA's TRMM satellite measured Odile's heavy rainfall rates on Sept. 18, and NOAA's GOES-West satellite saw the clouds associated with the former storm continue to linger over the US Southwest on Sept. 19.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
NASA catches a weaker Edouard, headed toward Azores
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Atlantic Ocean and captured a picture of Tropical Storm Edouard as it continues to weaken.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
Magnetic Resonance in Medicine
A better way to track emerging cell therapies using MRIs
In a paper published Sept. 17 in the online journal Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh and elsewhere describe the first human tests of using a perfluorocarbon tracer in combination with non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging to track therapeutic immune cells injected into patients with colorectal cancer.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy
Domestic violence likely more frequent for same-sex couples
Domestic violence occurs at least as frequently, and likely even more so, between same-sex couples compared to opposite-sex couples, according to a new review of research. Abuse is underreported in same-sex couples due to the stigma of sexual orientation.

Contact: Marla Paul
marla-paul@northwestern.edu
312-503-8928
Northwestern University

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
PLOS Currents: Outbreaks
Research predicts possible 6,800 new Ebola cases this month
Arizona State University and Harvard University researchers also discovered through modelling analysis that the rate of rise in cases significantly increased in August in Liberia and Guinea, around the time that a mass quarantine was put in place, indicating that the mass quarantine efforts may have made the outbreak worse than it would have been otherwise.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Julie Newberg
julie.newberg@asu.edu
480-727-3116
Arizona State University

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
Neuron
Mayo researchers reveal pathway that contributes to Alzheimer's disease
Researchers at Jacksonville's campus of Mayo Clinic have discovered a defect in a key cell-signaling pathway they say contributes to both overproduction of toxic protein in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients as well as loss of communication between neurons -- both significant contributors to this type of dementia.
National Institutes of Health, Alzheimer's Association, Mayo Clinic

Contact: Kevin Punsky
punsky.kevin@mayo.edu
904-953-0746
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
A two generation lens: Current state policies fail to support families with young children
Recent two generation approaches to reducing poverty that help children and their parents are receiving increasing attention. By combining education and training for parents, these programs aim to improve the life opportunities of both. However, according to a new report, State Policies through a Two-Generation Lens, while research supports this poverty reduction strategy, state policies fail to provide adequate two generation supports to families with young children.

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology
Reflected smartphone transmissions enable gesture control
University of Washington engineers have developed a new form of low-power wireless sensing technology that lets users 'train' their smartphones to recognize and respond to specific hand gestures near the phone.
University of Washington

Contact: Michelle Ma
mcma@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems
Fingertip sensor gives robot unprecedented dexterity
Researchers at MIT and Northeastern University have equipped a robot with a novel tactile sensor that lets it grasp a USB cable draped freely over a hook and insert it into a USB port.

Contact: Andrew Carleen
acarleen@mit.edu
617-253-1682
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
Soft Robotics
Soft robotics 'toolkit' features everything a robot-maker needs
A new resource unveiled today by researchers from several Harvard University labs in collaboration with Trinity College Dublin provides both experienced and aspiring researchers with the intellectual raw materials needed to design, build, and operate robots made from soft, flexible materials.

Contact: Paul Karoff
karoff@seas.harvard.edu
617-496-0450
Harvard University

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
Genetics
Researchers discover new gene responsible for traits involved in diabetes
A collaborative research team led by Medical College of Wisconsin scientists has identified a new gene associated with fasting glucose and insulin levels in rats, mice and in humans. The findings are published in the September issue of Genetics.

Contact: Maureen Mack
mmack@mcw.edu
414-955-4744
Medical College of Wisconsin

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
Acta Crystallographica Section D
A refined approach to proteins at low resolution
Crystals of membrane proteins and protein complexes often diffract to low resolution owing to their intrinsic molecular flexibility, heterogeneity or the mosaic spread of micro-domains. At low resolution, the building and refinement of atomic models is a more challenging task. The deformable elastic network refinement method developed previously has been instrumental in the determination of several structures at low resolution. Here, DEN refinement is reviewed.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: IUCR Press Office
ja@iucr.org
0044-124-434-2878
International Union of Crystallography

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
Journal of Systematic Palaeontology
New hadrosaur noses into spotlight
Call it the Jimmy Durante of dinosaurs -- a newly discovered hadrosaur with a truly distinctive nasal profile. The new dinosaur, named Rhinorex condrupus by paleontologists from North Carolina State University and Brigham Young University, lived in what is now Utah approximately 75 million years ago during the Late Cretaceous period.

Contact: Mick Kulikowski
mick_kulikowski@ncsu.edu
919-515-8387
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
IEEE/ASME: Transactions on Mechatronics
Shrink-wrapping spacesuits
The MIT BioSuit is a skintight spacesuit that offers improved mobility and reduced mass compared to modern gas-pressurized spacesuits.

Contact: Kimberly Allen
allenkc@mit.edu
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
Simple test can help detect Alzheimer's before dementia signs show: York U study
Faculty of Health Professor Lauren Sergio and PhD candidate Kara Hawkins who led the study asked the participants to complete four increasingly demanding visual-spatial and cognitive-motor tasks, on dual screen laptop computers. The test aimed at detecting the tendency for Alzheimer's in those who were having cognitive difficulty even though they were not showing outward signs of the disease.

Contact: Gloria Suhasini
suhasini@yorku.ca
416-736-2100 x22094
York University

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
2D Materials
Graphene sensor tracks down cancer biomarkers
An ultrasensitive biosensor made from the wonder material graphene has been used to detect molecules that indicate an increased risk of developing cancer.

Contact: Michael Bishop
michael.bishop@iop.org
01-179-301-032
Institute of Physics

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
Long-distance communication from leaves to roots
Leguminous plants create symbiotic organs called nodules in their roots. Japanese researchers have shown that cytokinins, a kind of plant hormone, play an important role in preserving proper root nodule numbers using the model plant Lotus japonicus. The results of this work were published in the journal Nature Communications titled 'Shoot-derived cytokinins systemically regulate root nodulation.'

Contact: Office of Public Relations National Institute for Basic Biol
press@nibb.ac.jp
National Institutes of Natural Sciences

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
Veterinary Microbiology
Lymphatic fluid used for first time to detect bovine paratuberculosis
Paratuberculosis is a bovine disease affecting up to 19 percent of dairy farms in Austria. The affected animals must be culled from the herd as quickly as possible. In order to recognize the disease before it manifests, researchers from the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, for the first time employed a rapid test of the lymphatic fluid of the animals and inform about it in the journal Veterinary Microbiology.

Contact: Johannes Lorenz Khol
johannes.khol@vetmeduni.ac.at
43-125-077-5205
University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
Environmental Science & Technology
Environmental pollutants make worms susceptible to cold
Some pollutants are more harmful in a cold climate than in a hot, because they affect the temperature sensitivity of certain organisms. Now researchers from Danish universities have demonstrated how this happens, and it can help us better predict contamination risks, especially in the Arctic.

Contact: Birgitte Svennevig
birs@sdu.dk
University of Southern Denmark

Public Release: 19-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Quick-change materials break the silicon speed limit for computers
Faster, smaller, greener computers, capable of processing information up to 1,000 times faster than currently available models, could be made possible by replacing silicon with materials that can switch back and forth between different electrical states.
UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

Contact: Sarah Collins
sarah.collins@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-012-237-65542
University of Cambridge

Showing releases 1-25 out of 486.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>