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Showing releases 1-25 out of 409.

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Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Psychiatry Research
Treating depression in PD patients: New research
The Sanders-Brown Center on Aging has found interesting new information in a study on depression and neuropsychological function in Parkinson's disease.

Contact: Laura Dawahare
laura.dawahare@uky.edu
University of Kentucky

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Nature
Stanford researchers rethink 'natural' habitat for wildlife
Protecting wildlife while feeding a world population predicted to reach nine billion by 2050 will require a holistic approach to conservation that considers human-altered landscapes such as farmland, according to Stanford researchers.

Contact: Rob Jordan
rjordan@stanford.edu
650-721-1881
Stanford University

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
MRI, on a molecular scale
A team of scientists, led by professor of physics and of applied physics Amir Yacoby, have developed a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that can produce nano-scale images, and may one day allow researchers to peer into the atomic structure of individual molecules.

Contact: Peter Reuell
preuell@fas.harvard.edu
617-496-8070
Harvard University

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Nature
Flipping the switch
Harvard researchers have succeeded in creating quantum switches that can be turned on and off using a single photon, an achievement that could pave the way for the creation of highly secure quantum networks.

Contact: Peter Reuell
preuell@fas.harvard.edu
617-496-8070
Harvard University

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
The Gerontologist
Religious music brings benefit to seniors' mental health
A new article published online in The Gerontologist reports that among older Christians, listening to religious music is associated with a decrease in anxiety about death and increases in life satisfaction, self-esteem, and sense of control over their lives. In particular, listening to gospel music is associated with a decrease in anxiety about death and an increase in sense of control.

Contact: Todd Kluss
tkluss@geron.org
202-587-2839
The Gerontological Society of America

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Science
Researchers find 3-million-year-old landscape beneath Greenland ice sheet
Glaciers and ice sheets are commonly thought to work like a belt sander. As they move over the land they scrape off everything -- vegetation, soil and even the top layer of bedrock. So a team of university scientists and a NASA colleague were greatly surprised to discover an ancient tundra landscape preserved under the Greenland ice sheet, below two miles of ice.
NASA, University of Vermont

Contact: Maria-Jose Vinas-Garcia
maria-jose.vinasgarcia@nasa.gov
301-614-5883
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Sun emits a mid-level solar flare
The sun emitted a mid-level solar flare, peaking at 9:03 a.m. EDT on April 18, 2014, and NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captured images of the event. Solar flares are powerful bursts of radiation. Harmful radiation from a flare cannot pass through Earth's atmosphere to physically affect humans on the ground, however -- when intense enough -- they can disturb the atmosphere in the layer where GPS and communications signals travel.
NASA

Contact: Susan Hendrix
Susan.m.hendrix@nasa.gov
301-286-7745
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Soil Science Society of America Journal
Researchers question published no-till soil organic carbon sequestration rates
For the past 20 years, researchers have published soil organic carbon sequestration rates. Many of the research findings have suggested that soil organic carbon can be sequestered by simply switching from moldboard or conventional tillage systems to no-till systems. However, there is a growing body of research with evidence that no-till systems in corn and soybean rotations without cover crops, small grains, and forages may not be increasing soil organic carbon stocks at the published rates.

Contact: Debra Levey Larson
dlarson@illinois.edu
217-244-2880
University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Science
Finding turns neuroanatomy on its head
Harvard neuroscientists have made a discovery that turns 160 years of neuroanatomy on its head. Myelin, the electrical insulating material long known to be essential for the fast transmission of impulses along the axons of nerve cells, is not as ubiquitous as thought, according to a new work lead by Professor Paola Arlotta of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute, in collaboration with Professor Jeff Lichtman, of Harvard's Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology.

Contact: B. D. Colen
617-495-7821
Harvard University

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
New Phytologist
Plants with dormant seeds give rise to more species
Seeds that sprout as soon as they're planted may be good news for a garden. But in the wild, a plant whose seeds sprouted at the first warm spell or rainy day would risk disaster. More than just an insurance policy against late frosts or unexpected dry spells, it turns out that seed dormancy has long-term advantages too: plants whose seeds put off sprouting until conditions are more certain give rise to more species.

Contact: Robin Ann Smith
rsmith@nescent.org
919-668-4544
National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent)

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Ancient DNA offers clues to how barnyard chickens came to be
Ancient DNA adds a twist to the story of how barnyard chickens came to be, finds a study to be published April 21 in the journal PNAS. Analyzing DNA from the bones of chickens that lived 200-2,300 years ago in Europe, researchers report that some of the traits we associate with modern domestic chickens -- such as their yellowish skin -- only became widespread in the last 500 years, much more recently than previously thought.

Contact: Greger Larson
greger.larson@durham.ac.uk
44-796-390-5362
National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent)

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience
New study suggests a better way to deal with bad memories
Researchers have determined a simple and effective emotion-regulation strategy that has neurologically and behaviorally been proven to lessen the emotional impact of personal negative memories.
Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, Conflict Prevention and Resolution Forum, University of Illinois

Contact: August Cassens
acassens@illinois.edu
217-300-4181
Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
'Exotic' material is like a switch when super thin
Researchers from Cornell University and Brookhaven National Laboratory have shown how to switch a particular transition metal oxide, a lanthanum nickelate, from a metal to an insulator by making the material less than a nanometer thick.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Office of Naval Research

Contact: Syl Kacapyr
vpk6@cornell.edu
607-255-7701
Cornell University

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Advanced Materials
Gecko-like adhesives now useful for real world surfaces
Crosby and polymer science researcher Dan King, with other UMass Amherst researchers including biology professor Duncan Irschick, report in the current issue of Advanced Materials how they have expanded their design theory to allow Geckskin to adhere powerfully to a wider variety of surfaces found in most homes such as drywall, and wood.

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Geology
Impact glass stores biodata for millions of years
Bits of plant life encapsulated in molten glass by asteroid and comet impacts millions of years ago give geologists information about climate and life forms on the ancient Earth. Scientists exploring large fields of impact glass in Argentina suggest that what happened on Earth might well have happened on Mars millions of years ago. Martian impact glass could hold traces of organic compounds.

Contact: Mark Nickel
mark_nickel@brown.edu
401-863-1638
Brown University

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Science
Frozen in time: 3-million-year-old landscape still exists beneath the Greenland ice sheet
Some of the landscape underlying the massive Greenland ice sheet may have been undisturbed for almost 3 million years, ever since the island became completely ice-covered, according to researchers funded by the National Science Foundation.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Joshua Brown
joshua.e.brown@uvm.edu
802-656-3039
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Leukos
Under some LED bulbs whites aren't 'whiter than white'
For years, companies have been adding whiteners to laundry detergent, paints, plastics, paper and fabrics to make whites look 'whiter than white,' but now, with a switch away from incandescent and fluorescent lighting, different degrees of whites may all look the same, according to experts in lighting.
Soraa Inc.

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Angewandte Chemie
Innovative strategy to facilitate organ repair
A significant breakthrough could revolutionize surgical practice and regenerative medicine. A team led by Ludwik Leibler from the Laboratoire Matière Molle et Chimie (CNRS/ESPCI Paris Tech) and Didier Letourneur from the Laboratoire Recherche Vasculaire Translationnelle (INSERM/Universités Paris Diderot and Paris 13), has just demonstrated that the principle of adhesion by aqueous solutions of nanoparticles can be used in vivo to repair soft-tissue organs and tissues.

Contact: Didier Letourneur
didier.letourneur@inserm.fr
33-014-025-8600
INSERM (Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale)

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Applied Physics Letters
Impurity size affects performance of emerging superconductive material
Research from North Carolina State University finds that impurities can hurt performance -- or possibly provide benefits -- in a key superconductive material that is expected to find use in a host of applications, including future particle colliders. The size of the impurities determines whether they help or hinder the material's performance.

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
American Journal of Preventive Medicine
New research shows people are thinking about their health early in the week
A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine analyzing weekly patterns in health-related Google searches reveals a recurring pattern that could be leveraged to improve public health strategies. Investigators analyzed 'healthy' Google searches originating in the US from 2005 to 2012 and found that on average, searches for health topics were 30 percent more frequent at the beginning of the week than on days later in the week.

Contact: Beth Chee
bchee@mail.sdsu.edu
619-594-4563
San Diego State University

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
PLOS ONE
Counterfeit contraceptives found in South America
A survey of emergency contraceptive pills in Peru found that 28 percent of the batches studied were either of substandard quality or falsified. Many pills released the active ingredient too slowly. Others had the wrong active ingredient. One batch had no active ingredient at all.
Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

Contact: Brett Israel
brett.israel@comm.gatech.edu
404-385-1933
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
Chronic inflammation linked to 'high-grade' prostate cancer
Men who show signs of chronic inflammation in non-cancerous prostate tissue may have nearly twice the risk of actually having prostate cancer than those with no inflammation, according to results of a new study led by researchers from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Michelle Potter
mpotter8@jhmi.edu
410-614-2914
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
Chronic inflammation may be linked to aggressive prostate cancer
The presence of chronic inflammation in benign prostate tissue was associated with high-grade, or aggressive, prostate cancer, and this association was found even in those with low prostate-specific antigen levels, according to a study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Jeremy Moore
jeremy.moore@aacr.org
215-446-7109
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
Scientists discover brain's anti-distraction system
Two Simon Fraser University psychologists have made a brain-related discovery that could revolutionize doctors' perception and treatment of attention-deficit disorders. The Journal of Neuroscience has just published a paper about the discovery by John McDonald, an associate professor of psychology and his doctoral student John Gaspar, who made the discovery during his master's thesis research.

Contact: Carol Thorbes
cthorbes@sfu.ca
778-782-3035
Simon Fraser University

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Science
First Earth-size planet is discovered in another star's habitable zone
A team of astronomers that includes Penn State scientists has discovered the first Earth-size planet orbiting a star at a distance where liquid water might pool on the planet's surface. The discovery of this planet, named Kepler-186f, confirms for the first time that planets the size of Earth exist in the habitable zone of stars other than our Sun.
NASA Kepler Participating Scientist Program

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Showing releases 1-25 out of 409.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>