Choose Help The Kavli Prize

EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
25-Oct-2014 15:50
US Eastern Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Press Releases

Breaking News

Science Business

Grants, Awards, Books

Meetings

Multimedia

Science Agencies
on EurekAlert!

US Department of Energy

US National Institutes of Health

US National Science Foundation

Calendar

Submit a Calendar Item

Subscribe/Sponsor

Links & Resources

Portals

RSS Feeds

Accessibility Option On

Breaking News
US Department of Energy
US National Institutes of Health
US National Science Foundation


Arabic

Breaking News

Titles Only 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 470.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Hinode satellite captures X-ray footage of solar eclipse
The moon passed between the Earth and the sun on Thursday, Oct. 23. While avid stargazers in North America looked up to watch the spectacle, the best vantage point was several hundred miles above the North Pole. The Hinode spacecraft was in the right place at the right time to catch the solar eclipse. What's more, because of its vantage point Hinode witnessed a 'ring of fire' or annular eclipse.

Contact: Christine Pulliam
cpulliam@cfa.harvard.edu
617-495-7463
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Journal of Thoracic Oncology
Prognostic factors identified for peripheral squamous cell carcinomas of the lung
A better survival outcome is associated with low blood levels of squamous cell carcinoma antigen, or absence of tumor invasion either into the space between the lungs and chest wall or into blood vessels of individuals with a peripheral squamous cell carcinoma, a type of non-small cell lung cancer.

Contact: Rob Mansheim
rob.mansheim@iaslc.org
720-325-2952
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Science
Climate change caused by ocean, not just atmosphere, new Rutgers study finds
Most of the concerns about climate change have focused on the amount of greenhouse gases that have been released into the atmosphere. Read about a Rutgers study published in Science that reveals another equally important factor in regulating the earth's climate.

Contact: Ken Branson
kbranson@ucm.rutgers.edu
848-932-0580
Rutgers University

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Icarus
NASA identifies ice cloud above cruising altitude on Titan
NASA scientists have identified an unexpected high-altitude methane ice cloud on Saturn's moon Titan that is similar to exotic clouds found far above Earth's poles.
NASA

Contact: Liz Zubritsky
elizabeth.a.zubritsky@nasa.gov
301-614-5438
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Some like it loud
Species of poison frogs that utilize bright warning coloration as protection from predators are more likely to develop louder, more complex calls than relatives that rely on camouflage. New research indicates that because these visual cues establish certain species as unsavory prey, they are free to make noisy calls in plain sight and better attract possible mates.
National Science Foundation, National Evolutionary Synthesis Center

Contact: Nicole Duncan
nicole.duncan@nescent.org
919-668-7993
National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent)

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Marine Policy
Law of the Sea authorizes animal tagging research without nations' consent
Scientists who study migratory marine animals can rarely predict where the animals' paths will lead. In a new paper, Duke researchers argue that coastal nations don't have precedent under the law of the sea to require scientists to seek advance permission to remotely track tagged animals who may enter their waters. Requiring advance consent undermines the goals of the law, which is meant to encourage scientific research for conservation of marine animals.
Mary Derrickson McCurdy Visiting Scholar Program, Duke University Marine Laboratory

Contact: Tim Lucas
tdlucas@duke.edu
919-613-8084
Duke University

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
New study finds options for climate change policy are well characterized
Policy options for climate change risk management are straightforward and have well understood strengths and weaknesses, according to a new study by the American Meteorological Society Policy Program.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp., Lockheed Martin

Contact: Yael Seid-Green
yseidgreen@ametsoc.org
202-355-9821
American Meteorological Society

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Genetics in Medicine
Clues to genetics of congenital heart defects emerge from Down syndrome study
The largest genetic study of congenital heart defects in individuals with Down syndrome found a connection to rare, large genetic deletions affecting cilia.
NIH/Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Quinn Eastman
qeastma@emory.edu
404-727-7829
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases
New hope for drug discovery in African sleeping sickness
The neglected trop­ical dis­ease affects tens of thou­sands of people and is mostly fatal. Now, new research co-​​authored by North­eastern chem­istry pro­fessor Michael Pol­lastri has iden­ti­fied hun­dreds of chem­ical com­pounds that could lead to a cure.

Contact: Casey Bayer
c.bayer@neu.edu
617-373-2592
Northeastern University

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
European Spine Journal
New findings will improve the sex lives of women with back problems
Newly published findings from the University of Waterloo are giving women with bad backs renewed hope for better sex lives. The findings -- part of the first-ever study to document how the spine moves during sex -- outline which sex positions are best for women suffering from different types of low-back pain. The new recommendations follow on the heels of comparable guidelines for men released last month.

Contact: Pamela Smyth
psmyth@uwaterloo.ca
519-888-4777
University of Waterloo

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Journal of Biological Chemistry
New compounds reduce debilitating inflammation
Six Case Western Reserve scientists are part of an international team that has discovered two compounds that show promise in decreasing inflammation associated with diseases such as ulcerative colitis, arthritis and multiple sclerosis. The compounds, dubbed OD36 and OD38, appear to curtail inflammation-triggering signals from RIPK2. RIPK2 is an enzyme that activates high-energy molecules to prompt the immune system to respond with inflammation. The findings of this research appear in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.
National Institutes of Health, American Cancer Society, Burroughs Wellcome Career Award

Contact: Jeannette Spalding
jeannette.spalding@case.edu
216-368-3004
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Genes & Development
A new dent in HIV-1's armor
Salk scientists identify a promising target for HIV/AIDS treatment.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Center for Research Resources, Blasker-Rose-Miah Fund Margaret T. Morris Foundation

Contact: Salk Communications
press@salk.edu
Salk Institute

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Nature Geoscience
Icelandic volcano sits on massive magma hot spot
New research from University of California Davis and Aarhus University in Denmark shows that high mantle temperatures miles beneath the Earth's surface are essential for generating large amounts of magma. In fact, the scientists found that Iceland's Bardarbunga volcano lies directly above the hottest portion of the North Atlantic mantle plume.
National Science Foundation, Danish National Research Foundation

Contact: Charles Lesher
celesher@ucdavis.edu
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Emerging Adulthood
Relationships benefit when parents and adult children use multiple communication channels
University of Kansas research has found that found that adult children's relationship satisfaction with their parents is modestly influenced by the number of communication tools, such as cell phones, email, social networking sites, they use to communicate.

Contact: Christine Metz Howard
cmetzhoward@ku.edu
785-864-8852
University of Kansas

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Marine Ecology Progress Series
Climate change impacts countered by stricter fisheries management
A new study has found that implementing stricter fisheries management overcame the expected detrimental effects of climate change disturbances in coral reef fisheries badly impacted by the 1997/98 El Niño, according to the Wildlife Conservation Society.

Contact: John Delaney
jdelaney@wcs.org
718-220-3275
Wildlife Conservation Society

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Satellite catches lingering remnants of Tropical Depression 9
NOAA's GOES-East satellite has been keeping an eye on the remnants of Tropical Depression 9.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Organization Science
Startups should seek quality -- not quantity -- in partnerships, study finds
When partnering with larger companies, startups with a small number of carefully chosen alliances will reap the most benefits, according to new research from the University at Buffalo School of Management.

Contact: Matthew Biddle
mrbiddle@buffalo.edu
716-645-5455
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Ana still vigorous
NASA's TRMM satellite saw that Tropical Storm Ana was still generating moderate rainfall is it pulled away from Hawaii. The next day, NASA's Aqua satellite saw that wind shear was having an effect on the storm as it moved over open ocean.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness
Volunteer guidelines for clinicians in the ebola epidemic
A consortium of Boston-based hospitals has prepared a set of guidelines, titled 'Sign Me Up: Rules of the Road for Humanitarian Volunteers during the Ebola Outbreak'. The authors paint an honest picture of volunteer circumstances, and ask those considering volunteering to not make the decision lightly. They insist that the 'global healthcare community must and will rise to serve.'

Contact: Alice O'Donnell
dmphpjournal@gmail.com
240-833-4429
Society for Disaster Medicine and Public Health

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
APIC Ebola readiness survey findings
Only 6 percent of US hospitals are well-prepared to receive a patient with the Ebola virus, according to a survey of infection prevention experts at US hospitals conducted Oct. 10-15 by the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology.
The Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology

Contact: Liz Garman
egarman@apic.org
202-454-2604
Association for Professionals in Infection Control

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Angewandte Chemie
Li-ion batteries contain toxic halogens, but environmentally friendly alternatives exist
Physics researchers at VCU have discovered that most of the electrolytes used in lithium-ion batteries -- commonly found in consumer electronic devices -- are superhalogens, and that the vast majority of these electrolytes contain toxic halogens.
Department of Energy

Contact: Brian McNeill
bwmcneill@vcu.edu
804-827-0889
Virginia Commonwealth University

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Molecular beacons shine light on how cells 'crawl'
Chemists have devised a method using DNA-based tension probes to zoom in at the molecular level and measure and map how cells mechanically sense their environments, migrate and adhere to things.

Contact: Megan McRainey
megan.mcrainey@emory.edu
404-727-6171
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
EBioMedicine
Growing a blood vessel in a week
The technology for creating new tissues from stem cells has taken a giant leap forward. Three tablespoons of blood are all that is needed to grow a brand new blood vessel in just seven days. This is shown in a new study from The University of Gothenburg and Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Sweden, published in EBioMedicine.

Contact: Suchitra Sumitran-Holgersson
suchitra.holgersson@gu.se
46-727-490-808
University of Gothenburg

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
PeerJ
Ebola's evolutionary roots are more ancient than previously thought, study finds
A new study is helping to rewrite Ebola's family history. The research shows that Ebola and Marburg are each members of ancient evolutionary lines, and that these two viruses last shared a common ancestor sometime prior to 16-23 million years ago.

Contact: Charlotte Hsu
chsu22@buffalo.edu
716-645-4655
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
BMC Biology
Decrease of genetic diversity in the endangered Saimaa ringed seal continues
The critically endangered Saimaa ringed seal, which inhabits Lake Saimaa in Finland, has extremely low genetic diversity and this development seems to continue, according to a recent study completed at the University of Eastern Finland.

Contact: Mia Valtonen
mia.valtonen@uef.fi
358-504-424-404
University of Eastern Finland

Showing releases 1-25 out of 470.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>