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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 101-125 out of 365.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Journal of Environmental Sciences, Processes and Impacts
Second-hand e-cig smoke compared to regular cigarette smoke
Second-hand e-cig smoke has 10 times less particulate matter than regular cigarette smoke; but higher levels of certain toxic metals.
Fondazione IRCCS Instituto Nazionale dei Tumori

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-740-9226
University of Southern California

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Cell
Small molecule acts as on-off switch for nature's antibiotic factory
Duke biochemists have identified the developmental on-off switch for Streptomyces, a group of soil microbes that produce more than two-thirds of the world's naturally derived antibiotic medicines. Their hope now would be to see whether it is possible to manipulate this switch to make nature's antibiotic factory more efficient.
Long Term EMBO Fellowship, Leopoldina, Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, MET Institute Strategic Programme, Duke University School of Medicine

Contact: Karl Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Science
Watching the structure of glass under pressure
Glass has many applications that call for different properties, such as resistance to thermal shock or to chemically harsh environments. Glassmakers commonly use additives such as boron oxide to tweak these properties by changing the atomic structure of glass. Now researchers at UC Davis have for the first time captured atoms in borosilicate glass flipping from one structure to another as it is placed under high pressure.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Journal of Neonatal Nursing
Breastfeeding study shows need for effective peer counseling programs
The support of peer groups and clinicians is critical to the development of effective breastfeeding programs, according to recent University of Georgia research. A qualitative study of 21 mothers in the Athens-Clarke County area determined that role models for successful breastfeeding help positively shape the outcomes of mothers of infants.

Contact: Alex Anderson
fianko@uga.edu
706-542-7614
University of Georgia

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Cell Reports
UMN researchers find animal model for understudied type of muscular dystrophy
Researchers at the University of Minnesota have developed an animal research model for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) to be used for muscle regeneration research as well as studies of the effectiveness of potential therapies for FSHD. The research is published in the current edition of the journal Cell Reports.
National Institutes of Health, Dr. Bob and Jean Smith Foundation, Friends of FSH Research, FSH Society

Contact: Caroline Marin
crmarin@umn.edu
612-624-5680
University of Minnesota Academic Health Center

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Cell
New tool aids stem cell engineering for medical research
A Mayo Clinic researcher and his collaborators have developed an online analytic tool that will speed up and enhance the process of re-engineering cells for biomedical investigation. CellNet is a free-use Internet platform that uses network biology methods to aid stem cell engineering. Details of CellNet and its application to stem cell engineering are described in two back-to-back papers in the journal Cell.

Contact: Robert Nellis
newsbureau@mayo.edu
507-284-5005
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Journal of Infectious Diseases
New analysis of old HIV vaccines finds potentially protective immune response
Applying the benefit of hindsight, researchers at Duke Medicine have reanalyzed the findings of two historic pediatric HIV vaccine trials with encouraging results. The vaccines had in fact triggered an antibody response -- now known to be associated with protection in adults -- that was previously unrecognized in the infants studied in the 1990s.
Duke University Center for AIDS Research, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Nature Materials
A new, tunable device for spintronics
Recently, the research group of Professor Jairo Sinova from the Institute of Physics at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz in collaboration with researchers from the UK, Prague, and Japan, has for the first time realised a new, efficient spin-charge converter based on the common semiconductor material GaAs. These results have recently been published in the journal Nature Materials.

Contact: Jairo Sinova
sinova@uni-mainz.de
49-613-139-21284
Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Ecology Letters
Study finds marine protected areas inadequate for protecting fish and ocean ecology
A new study reports that an expansion of marine protected areas is needed to protect fish species that perform key ecological functions. According to investigators from the Wildlife Conservation Society and other organizations, previous efforts at protecting fish have focused on saving the largest numbers of species, often at the expense of those species that provide key and difficult-to-replace ecological functions.

Contact: John Delaney
jdelaney@wcs.org
718-220-3275
Wildlife Conservation Society

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
NASA's TRMM analyzes Hurricane Cristobal
NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM Satellite provided a look under the hood of Hurricane Cristobal as it continues moving north and paralleling the US East Coast. NASA's HS3 hurricane mission also investigated the storm. Cristobal is now close enough to the coast to trigger high surf advisories.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Science
How the zebrafish gets its stripes
Max Planck scientists uncover how beautiful color patterns can develop in animals.

Contact: Nadja Winter
presse-eb@tuebingen.mpg.de
49-707-160-1444
Max-Planck-Gesellschaft

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
NASA's TRMM satellite adds up Cristobal's heavy rainfall in the Caribbean
The Caribbean Islands of Turks and Caicos were drenched from Tropical Storm Cristobal before the storm moved north and intensified into a hurricane. NASA's TRMM satellite added up the rainfall and revealed the soaking those islands received.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
ReCALL
Computer games give a boost to English
If you want to make a mark in the world of computer games you had better have a good English vocabulary. It has now also been scientifically proven that someone who is good at computer games has a larger English vocabulary. This is revealed by a study at the University of Gothenburg and Karlstad University, Sweden.

Contact: Torsten Arpi
torsten.arpi@ped.gu.se
46-031-786-2161
University of Gothenburg

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Lancet
The Lancet: Respiratory infection controls being used for ebola patients are unnecessary and may contribute to public panic
Respiratory infection control measures -- which have been adopted by most health agencies to deal with the Ebola epidemic in west Africa -- are unnecessary, and may heighten panic and fear among the public, according to the authors of a new letter, published in The Lancet, and written by professor Jose M. Martin-Moreno from the University of Valencia in Spain, and colleagues.

Contact: Jose Martin-Moreno
dr.martinmoreno@gmail.com
34-601-173-883
The Lancet

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Pharmaceutics
Sensory-tested drug-delivery vehicle could limit spread of HIV, AIDS
A unique method for delivering compounds that could positively impact the global battle against HIV and AIDS may be possible, thanks to researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Science
Penn-NIH team discover new type of cell movement
In a new study from the University of Pennsylvania and National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, scientists used an innovative technique to study how cells move in a three-dimensional matrix, similar to the structure of certain tissues, such as the skin. They discovered an entirely new type of cell movement whereby the nucleus helps propel cells through the matrix like a piston in an engine.
NIH/National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
kbaillie@upenn.edu
215-898-9194
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Journal of Applied Physics
New analytical technology reveals 'nanomechanical' surface traits
A new research platform uses a laser to measure the 'nanomechanical' properties of tiny structures undergoing stress and heating, an approach likely to yield insights to improve designs for microelectronics and batteries.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Emil Venere
venere@purdue.edu
765-494-4709
Purdue University

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
American Journal of Botany
Together, humans and computers can figure out the plant world
Recent research applying bioinformatics and biometrics to the study of plant form and function is presented in a special issue on Bioinformatic and Biometric Methods in Plant Morphology, published in Applications in Plant Sciences. The methods presented in the issue include automated classification and identification, a new online pollen database with semantic search capabilities, geometric morphometrics, and skeleton networks, and present a picture of a renaissance in morphometric approaches that capitalize on recent technological advances.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Beth Parada
apps@botany.org
American Journal of Botany

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Journal of Dental Hygiene
UTHealth researchers find up to 3,000 times the bacterial growth on hollow-head toothbrushes
Solid-head power toothbrushes retain less bacteria compared to hollow-head toothbrushes, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Dentistry.
Advanced Response Corporation

Contact: Edgar Veliz
Edgar.R.Veliz@uth.tmc.edu
713-500-3307
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Surgery
Females ignored in basic medical research
A new study from Northwestern Medicine has found that surgical researchers rarely use female animals or female cells in their published studies -- despite a huge body of evidence showing that sex differences can play a crucial role in medical research.

Contact: Erin White
ewhite@northwestern.edu
847-491-4888
Northwestern University

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Environmental Science: Processes and Impacts
New solutions needed to recycle fracking water
Rice University scientists have produced a detailed analysis of water produced by hydraulic fracturing of three gas reservoirs and suggested environmentally friendly remedies are needed to treat and reuse it.
Robert A. Welch Foundation, Welsh Government Sêr Cymru Program

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Antiquity
Ancient metal workers were not slaves but highly regarded craftsmen
In the course of ongoing excavations at Timna Valley, Tel Aviv University archaeologists analyzed remnants of food eaten by copper smelters 3,000 years ago. This analysis indicates that the laborers operating the furnaces were in fact skilled craftsmen who enjoyed high social status and adulation. They believe their discovery may have ramifications for similar sites across the region.

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Biomedical Optics Express
This is your brain's blood vessels on drugs
Researchers from Stony Brook University and NIH used a laser-based method to produce the first-ever set of images clearly and directly detailing how cocaine shuts down blood flow in the brain. This could help doctors and researchers better understand how drug abuse affects the brain, which may aid in improving brain-cancer surgery and tissue engineering, and lead to better treatment for recovering drug addicts. The work was published today in the journal Biomedical Optics Express.

Contact: Angela Stark
astark@osa.org
202-416-1443
The Optical Society

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
British Journal of Cancer
Some women still don't underststand 'overdiagnosis' risk in breast screening
A third of women who are given information about the chance of 'overdiagnosis' through the NHS breast screening programme may not fully understand the risks involved.
Cancer Research UK

Contact: Flora Malein
flora.malein@cancer.org.uk
020-346-98300
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
European Physical Journal B
Inter-dependent networks stress test
Energy production systems are good examples of complex systems. Their infrastructure equipment requires ancillary sub-systems structured like a network -- including water for cooling, transport to supply fuel, and ICT systems for control and management. Every step in the network chain is interconnected with a wider network and they are all mutually dependent. Gaihua Fu and colleagues have studied various aspects of inter-network dependencies, not previously explored, and their findings have been published in EPJ B.

Contact: Laura Zimmermann
laura.zimmermann@springer.com
49-622-148-78414
Springer

Showing releases 101-125 out of 365.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>