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Showing releases 101-125 out of 328.

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Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Journal of Dental Research
Rare bone diseases and their dental, oral and craniofacial manifestations
The International and American Associations for Dental Research (IADR/AADR) have published a paper titled 'Rare Bone Diseases and Their Dental, Oral, and Craniofacial Manifestations.' The complete review is published in the OnlineFirst portion of the IADR/AADR Journal of Dental Research.

Contact: Ingrid L. Thomas
ithomas@iadr.org
703-299-8084
International & American Associations for Dental Research

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Journal of Pediatric Nursing
Dog ownership benefits families of children with autism, MU researcher finds
A University of Missouri researcher studied dog ownership decisions in families of children with autism and found, regardless of whether they owned dogs, the parents reported the benefits of dog ownership included companionship, stress relief and opportunities for their children to learn responsibility.

Contact: Jesslyn Chew
ChewJ@missouri.edu
573-882-8353
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Henry Ford Hospital hits new heart valve surgery milestone
Doctors at Henry Ford Hospital reached a medical milestone April 3, performing the 25th successful transcatheter valve replacement using a novel way to access the heart. Henry Ford is the only hospital in the United States performing the unique procedure called transcaval valve replacement, which accesses the heart by temporarily connecting major blood vessels.

Contact: Tammy Battaglia
Tammy.Battaglia@hfhs.org
248-881-0809
Henry Ford Health System

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Researchers identify children with emotional behavior difficulties
Research on children orphaned by HIV/AIDS in South Africa may provide insight on how to identify and help children with emotional behavior issues in other areas of the world, which may have limited access to healthcare and further research that could lead to successful interventions.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Melissa Carroll
mcarroll@uh.edu
713-743-8153
University of Houston

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Astrophysical Journal
Cosmic slurp
A 'tidal disruption' occurs when a star orbits too close to a black hole and gets usurped. Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology are using NSF XSEDE supercomputers Stampede and Kraken to simulate tidal disruptions to better understand the dynamics of the process. Doing so will help astronomers find many more possible candidates of tidal disruptions in sky surveys and reveal details of how stars and black holes interact.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Faith Singer
faith@tacc.utexas.edu
512-232-5771
University of Texas at Austin, Texas Advanced Computing Center

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
'Problem wells' source of greenhouse gas at unexpected stage of natural gas production
High levels of the greenhouse gas methane were found above shale gas wells at a production point not thought to be an important emissions source. The findings could have implications for the evaluation of the environmental impacts from natural gas production. The study, which is one of only a few to use a so-called "top down" approach that measures methane gas levels in the air above wells, identified seven individual well pads with high emission levels during the drilling stage.
David R. Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future at Cornell University

Contact: Elizabeth K. Gardner
ekgardner@purdue.edu
765-494-2081
Purdue University

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Fisheries
Making dams safer for fish around the world
The pressure changes that many fish experience when they travel through the turbulent waters near a dam can seriously injure or kill the fish. Scientists from around the world, including areas like Southeast Asia and Brazil where huge dams are planned or under construction, are working together to protect fish from the phenomenon, known as barotrauma.
US Army Corps of Engineers, US Department of Energy

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
NASA sees remnants of Tropical Depression Peipah over Southern Philippines
Tropical Depression Peipah has been very stubborn and has moved over the southern and central Philippines bringing clouds, showers and gusty winds.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Beam on target!
Late on April 1, the crown jewel of the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility sparkled its way into a new era. Following an upgrade of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, the CEBAF accelerator delivered the highest-energy electron beams it has ever produced into a target in an experimental hall, recording the first data of the 12 GeV era.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
Website information on colon cancer too complex, fails to address key concerns
Popular web information on colorectal cancer is too difficult for most lay people to read and doesn't address the appropriate risks to and concerns of patients, a study by UT Southwestern gastroenterologists suggests.

Contact: Russell Rian
russell.rian@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Ita over the Coral Sea
Tropical Cyclone Ita made landfall in northeastern Queensland, Australia, on April 11 as a powerful Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale, moved south and re-emerged in the Coral Sea on April 14 where NASA's TRMM and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP Satellites captured imagery of the weakened storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Frontiers in Psychology
Babies prefer fairness -- but only if it benefits them -- in choosing a playmate
Babies as young as 15 months preferred people with the same ethnicity as themselves -- a phenomenon known as in-group bias, or favoring people who have the same characteristics as oneself.
Wake Forest University

Contact: Molly McElroy
mollywmc@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Zootaxa
Researchers describe 4 new species of 'killer sponges' from the deep sea
Killer sponges sound like creatures from a B-grade horror movie. In fact, they thrive in the lightless depths of the deep sea. Scientists first discovered that some sponges are carnivorous about 20 years ago. Since then only seven carnivorous species have been found in all of the northeastern Pacific. A new paper authored by MBARI marine biologist Lonny Lundsten and two Canadian researchers describes four new species of carnivorous sponges living on the deep seafloor, from the Pacific Northwest to Baja California.
David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Contact: Kim Fulton-Bennett
kfb@mbari.org
831-775-1835
Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Justice Quarterly
UT Dallas study: Youth who fail to envision future commit more crimes
In a UT Dallas study involving serious youth offenders, the answer to one open-ended question predicted the teenagers' offending patterns for the next seven years: 'How long do you think you'll live?' According to the study, having little hope for the future encourages offending over time.

Contact: Brittany Hoover
brittany.hoover@utdallas.edu
972-883-4357
University of Texas at Dallas

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Nature Photonics
Shiny quantum dots brighten future of solar cells
A house window that doubles as a solar panel could be on the horizon, thanks to recent quantum-dot work by Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers in collaboration with scientists from University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy. Their project demonstrates that superior light-emitting properties of quantum dots can be applied in solar energy by helping more efficiently harvest sunlight.
DOE Office of Science

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
Long-term antibiotic treatment for Q fever causes weight gain
Scientists have unearthed still more evidence that antibiotics can contribute to obesity. Research published ahead of print in the journal Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy suggests that patients on long-term antibiotic treatment gained weight and had significant changes in their gut microbiota.

Contact: Jim Sliwa
jsliwa@asmusa.org
202-942-9297
American Society for Microbiology

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Internal Medicine 2014
Osteoporosis drugs appear to impede cell membrane repair
A class of drugs widely used to treat osteoporosis appears to impede a cell's ability to repair a protective outer membrane that helps determine what enters and exits, researchers report.

Contact: Toni Baker
tbaker@gru.edu
706-721-4421
Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Pediatrics
Young dads at high risk of depression, too
This study is the first to identify when young fathers are at increased risk of developing depressive symptoms. Craig Garfield, M.D., lead author of the paper, said the results of this longitudinal study are significant and could lead to more effective interventions and treatment for young men early in the fatherhood years.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute For Child Health and Development

Contact: Erin White
ewhite@northwestern.edu
847-491-4888
Northwestern University

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Journal of the American College of Nutrition
Dietary supplement use among US adults more prevalent than previously thought
Dietary supplement use by US adults is more prevalent than indicated by published data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, according to a new article in the peer-reviewed Journal of the American College of Nutrition. The review article is based on five consecutive years of online market research studies, conducted by Ipsos Public Affairs for the Council for Responsible Nutrition.

Contact: Nancy Stewart
nstewart@crnusa.org
202-204-7684
Council for Responsible Nutrition

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Nature Neuroscience
Neuroscientists: Brain activity may mark the beginning of memories
By tracking brain activity when an animal stops to look around its environment, neuroscientists now can mark the birth of a memory.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Latarsha Gatlin
lgatlin1@jhu.edu
443-997-9909
Johns Hopkins University

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Blood
Ex vivo efficacy of C1s antibody as Complement inhibitor in cold agglutinin disease
True North Therapeutics announced a publication demonstrating that the company's C1s antibody prevents the destruction of human red blood cells exposed to plasma samples of patients with a type of autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The article entitled 'TNT003, an inhibitor of the serine protease C1s, prevents complement activation induced by cold agglutinin disease patient autoantibodies' was published on-line in the journal Blood earlier this month.
True North Therapeutics

Contact: Kathryn Morris
kathryn@theyatesnetwork.com
845-635-9828
The Yates Network

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
ZooKeys
Three new species of yellow-shouldered bats discovered in museum collections
Scientists at Chicago's Field Museum and international collaborators have reconstructed the phylogeny and biological history for the Yellow-shouldered bats in the New World tropics, the region of the Earth surrounding the equator. In-depth analysis of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences uncovered three species new to science, each having previously been confused with another species.

Contact: Nancy O'Shea
noshea@fieldmuseum.org
312-665-7103
Field Museum

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Health Psychology
Irrational health beliefs linked to skipping cardiac rehab sessions
Heart patients with irrational health beliefs -- such as doubting the preventive value of a flu vaccine -- are more likely to skip cardiac rehab sessions, new research suggests.

Contact: Charles Emery
Emery.33@0osu.edu
614-688-3061
Ohio State University

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Journal of American College of Surgeons
Antibiotics alone are a successful treatment for uncomplicated acute appendicitis in kids
Using antibiotics alone to treat children with uncomplicated acute appendicitis is a reasonable alternative to surgery that leads to less pain and fewer missed school days, according to a pilot study. The research, published online April 12 in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons, is the first prospective study on nonoperative management of acute appendicitis in pediatric patients in the United States.

Contact: Gina Bericchia
Gina.Bericchia@NationwideChildrens.org
614-355-0487
Nationwide Children's Hospital

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Study gives high marks to NC Pre-K program
Scientists from UNC's Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute have released their new study of NC Pre-K, the state's program to prepare four-year-olds for success in kindergarten. According to FPG's findings, students enrolled in NC Pre-K show significant gains across all areas of learning, progressing at an even greater rate than is expected for normal developmental growth.
Department of Health and Human Services

Contact: Dave Shaw
Dave@unc.edu
919-621-3933
Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute

Showing releases 101-125 out of 328.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>