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Showing releases 126-150 out of 466.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Science
Jackson Laboratory researchers find new mechanism for neurodegeneration
A research team led by Jackson Laboratory professor and Howard Hughes investigator Susan Ackerman, Ph.D., have pinpointed a surprising mechanism behind neurodegeneration in mice, one that involves a defect in a key component of the cellular machinery that makes proteins, known as transfer RNA or tRNA.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Science Foundation

Contact: Joyce Peterson
joyce.peterson@jax.org
207-288-6058
Jackson Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
PLOS Pathogens
Fighting bacteria -- with viruses
Research published today in PLOS Pathogens reveals how viruses called bacteriophages destroy the bacterium Clostridium difficile, which is becoming a serious problem in hospitals and healthcare institutes, due to its resistance to antibiotics. The study, by scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Hamburg, Germany, could help bring about a new way of fighting this and other bacteria.

Contact: Sonia Furtado Neves
sonia.furtado@embl.de
European Molecular Biology Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Newly discovered gut virus lives in half the world's population
Odds are, there's a virus living inside your gut that has gone undetected by scientists for decades. A new study led by researchers at San Diego State University has found that more than half the world's population is host to a newly described virus, named crAssphage, which infects one of the most common gut bacterial species, Bacteroides. This bacterium thought to be connected with obesity, diabetes and other gut-related diseases.

Contact: Natalia Elko
natalia.elko@mail.sdsu.edu
619-594-2585
San Diego State University

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
The Lancet
Common blood thinner for pregnant women proven ineffective: Lancet study
A daily injection to the belly commonly prescribed for pregnant women at risk of developing blood clots is found to be ineffective in a clinical trial led by researchers at The Ottawa Hospital and published by the prestigious medical journal The Lancet.
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada

Contact: Paddy Moore
padmoore@ohri.ca
613-737-8899 x73687
Ottawa Hospital Research Institute

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology
Test helps predict which children with kidney disease will respond to standard therapy
Among children with sporadic nephrotic syndrome, genetic mutations in the kidney's filtration barrier were frequently linked with a lack of response to immunosuppressive treatments. The genetic test was even more predictive than a kidney biopsy for identifying children who would not benefit from immunosuppressive therapies.

Contact: Tracy Hampton
thampton@nasw.org
American Society of Nephrology

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology
Ferric citrate may reduce dialysis patients' need for multiple medications
Ferric citrate effectively reduced blood phosphorus levels while increasing iron stores and decreasing the need for intravenous iron and anemia medications in dialysis patients. The medication may help reduce complications and costs associated with kidney disease care.
Keryx Biopharmaceuticals, Inc.

Contact: Tracy Hampton
thampton@nasw.org
American Society of Nephrology

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Child Development
Community service programs that include reflection found to be more beneficial to youth
Using meta-analysis to asses 49 studies from around the world, researchers have found that community service that includes reflection is more beneficial for adolescents than community service that does not. The studies analyzed were conducted from 1980 to 2012 and involved 24,477 adolescent participants. Community service had a positive effect on academic, social, and civic outcomes. This effect was found to be substantial only in programs that included reflection. Positive outcomes were stronger when community service was performed more often.
Utrecht University

Contact: Hannah Klein
hklein@srcd.org
202-289-0320
Society for Research in Child Development

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
American Urogynecologic Society 2014 Scientific Meeting
Female triathletes at risk for pelvic floor disorders and other complications
Female triathletes are at risk for pelvic floor disorders, decreased energy, menstrual irregularities and abnormal bone density, according to researchers at Loyola University Health System. These data were presented at the American Urogynecologic Society 2014 Scientific Meeting in Washington, D.C.

Contact: Nora Dudley
nodudley@lumc.edu
708-417-5014
Loyola University Health System

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Child Development
Stronger early reading skills predict higher intelligence later
A study of 1,890 identical twins has found that strong early reading skill might positively affect later intelligence. The twins, who are part of an ongoing longitudinal study in the United Kingdom, share all their genes as well as a home environment. Differences shown in intellectual ability came from experiences they didn't share. The twin with stronger early reading skills was found to have higher overall intellectual ability by age 7.
UK Medical Research Council, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, European Research Council

Contact: Hannah Klein
hklein@srcd.org
202-289-0320
Society for Research in Child Development

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Child Development
Stress tied to change in children's gene expression related to emotion regulation, physical health
In a new study, researchers found that maltreatment affects the way children's genes are activated, which has implications for their long-term development and health. The researchers examined DNA methylation, a biomechanical mechanism that helps cells control which genes are turned on or off, in the blood of 56 children ages 11 to 14. Disruptions in this system affect emotional behavior, stress levels, and the immune system. These findings echo those of earlier studies of rodents.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Waisman Center at the University of Wisconsin, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Hannah Klein
hklein@srcd.org
202-289-0320
Society for Research in Child Development

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Cell Reports
Mutated gene linked to both autism and intellectual disability
Autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability often occur together and may even share similar genetic causes. Researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Cell Reports have now linked mutations in a particular gene to the two disorders in humans. By revealing these genetic changes and their potential impact on common brain processes, researchers may uncover treatment approaches that could benefit a variety of patients.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
PLOS Pathogens
Linking the microbial and immune environment in semen to HIV viral load and transmission
Research published in PLOS Pathogens reports that HIV infection re-shapes the relationship between semen bacteria and immune factors which in turn affects viral load, suggesting that the semen microbiome plays a role in sexual transmission of HIV.

Contact: Lance Price
lprice@tgen.org
PLOS

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Neuron
Choice bias: A quirky byproduct of learning from reward
Many people value rewards they choose themselves more than rewards they merely receive, even when the rewards are actually equivalent. A new study in Neuron provides evidence that this long-observed quirk of behavior is a byproduct of how the brain reinforces learning from reward.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
PLOS Computational Biology
Gene changes in breast cancer cells pinpointed with new computational method
Computer scientists at Carnegie Mellon University, working with high-throughput data generated by breast cancer biologists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, have devised a computational method to determine how gene networks are rewired as normal breast cells turn malignant and as they respond to potential cancer therapy agents.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH/National Cancer Institute, DOE/Breast Cancer Research Program

Contact: Byron Spice
bspice@cs.cmu.edu
412-268-9068
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Science
No returning to Eden: Researchers explore how to restore species in a changing world
Reversing the increasing rate of global biodiversity losses may not be possible without embracing intensive, and sometimes controversial, forms of threatened species management, according to a New Zealand zoologist and colleagues writing in the leading international journal Science.

Contact: Philip Seddon
philip.seddon@otago.ac.nz
University of Otago

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Nature Scientific Data
Nearly 50 years of lemur data now available online
A 48-year archive of life history data for the world's largest and most diverse collection of endangered primates is now digital and available online. The Duke Lemur Center database allows visitors to view and download data for more than 3600 animals representing 27 species of lemurs, lorises and galagos -- distant primate cousins who predate monkeys and apes -- with more data to be uploaded in the future.
National Evolutionary Synthesis Center, National Science Foundation

Contact: Robin Ann Smith
ras10@duke.edu
919-668-4544
National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent)

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Researchers find mechanism that clears excess of protein linked with Type 2 diabetes
Researchers suggest that, in people who do not have Type 2 diabetes, autophagy prevents the accumulation of toxic forms of IAPP. In people with Type 2 diabetes, the process appears to not work properly, contributing to the destruction of beta cells. As the body's insulin producers, beta cells play a key role in maintaining healthy blood sugar levels.
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases,Larry L. Hillblom Foundation, Esther B. O'Keeffe Foundation

Contact: Enrique Rivero
erivero@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2273
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Laser therapy on the repair of a large-gap transected sciatic nerve in a reinforced nerve conduit
Despite considerable advances in microsurgical techniques, the functional results of peripheral nerve repair remain largely unsatisfactory. Regrowth of nerves across large gaps is particularly challenging, usually requiring a nerve graft to bridge the proximal and distal nerve stumps. The introduction of low-level laser in treating peripheral nerve damage has been widely demonstrated. For clinical applicability, LLL makes an important contribution towards the development of a safe and effective strategy for rehabilitating peripheral nerve injuries.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Who can control the potential targets against cell apoptosis after TIA in the elderly?
Mitochondria play an important role in neuronal apoptosis caused by cerebral ischemia. Researchers at the Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, China, discovered transient ischemia led to cell apoptosis in the hippocampus and changes in memory and cognition of aged rats.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Scientific Reports
Cost-effective, solvothermal synthesis of heteroatom (S or N)-doped graphene developed
A research team led by group leader Yung-Eun Sung has announced that they have developed cost-effective technology to synthesize sulfur-doped and nitrogen-doped graphenes which can be applied as high performance electrodes for secondary batteries and fuel cells.
Institute for Basic Science, Center for Integrated Smart Sensors, National Research Foundation of Korea

Contact: Hanbin Oh
ohanvin@ibs.re.kr
82-428-788-182
Institute for Basic Science

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Melatonin reduces traumatic brain injury-induced oxidative stress
Traumatic brain injury can cause post-traumatic neurodegenerations with an increase in reactive oxygen species and reactive oxygen species-mediated lipid peroxidation. Melatonin, a non-enzymatic antioxidant and neuroprotective agent, has been shown to counteract oxidative stress-induced pathophysiologic conditions like cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, neuronal excitotoxicity and chronic inflammation.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Alternative Law Journal
A crime to be gay in majority of the Commonwealth
As the Commonwealth Games get under way in Glasgow, it highlights that the modern Commonwealth of Nations is home to not only some great athletes, but also some of the most homophobic countries in the world. Of the 80 countries which still criminalise homosexuality; over half belong to the Commonwealth, with the geographical spread including Africa, The Americas, Asia and the Pacific.

Contact: Kate Howard
kate.l.howard@monash.edu
039-903-4840
Monash University

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society A
Discovery is key to metal wear in sliding parts
Researchers have discovered a previously unknown mechanism for wear in metals: a swirling, fluid-like microscopic behavior in a solid piece of metal sliding over another. The findings could be used to improve the durability of metal parts in numerous applications.
US Army Research Office, National Science Foundation

Contact: Emil Venere
venere@purdue.edu
765-494-4709
Purdue University

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Academic Medicine
Study reveals medical students believe health policy education is improving
Students graduating from US medical schools in 2012 feel they've received a better education in health policy issues than graduates surveyed in 2008, according to a multi-center study led by the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and published online this month in Academic Medicine. The study applied a new framework for teaching and evaluating perceptions of training in health policy, first proposed by the authors in a 2011 perspective published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Contact: Katie Delach
katie.delach@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5964
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Smarter than a first-grader?
In Aesop's fable about the crow and the pitcher, a thirsty bird happens upon a vessel of water, but when he tries to drink from it, he finds the water level out of his reach. Not strong enough to knock over the pitcher, the bird drops pebbles into it -- one at a time -- until the water level rises enough for him to drink his fill.

Contact: Andrea Estrada
andrea.estrada@ucsb.edu
805-893-4620
University of California - Santa Barbara

Showing releases 126-150 out of 466.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>