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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 126-150 out of 409.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Newborn Tropical Storm Polo gives a NASA satellite a 'cold reception'
The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite uses infrared light to read cloud top temperatures in tropical cyclones. When Aqua passed over newborn Tropical Storm Polo off of Mexico's southwestern coast it got a 'cold reception' when infrared data saw some very cold cloud top temperatures and strong storms within that hint at intensification.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
NASA spots center of Typhoon Kalmaegi over Hainan Island, headed for Vietnam
NASA's Aqua satellite saw Typhoon Kalmaegi's center near northern Hainan Island, China when it passed overhead on Sept. 16 at 06:00 UTC (2 a.m. EDT). Hours later, the storm crossed the Gulf of Tonkin, the body of water that separates Hainan Island from Vietnam, and was making landfall there at 11:30 a.m. EDT.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Pain Medicine
Patients waiting too long to see doctor? Try 'just-in-time' management methods, researchers urge
Using a pain clinic as a testing ground, researchers at Johns Hopkins have shown that a management process first popularized by Toyota in Japan can substantially reduce patient wait times and possibly improve the teaching of interns and residents.

Contact: Lauren Nelson
lnelso35@jhmi.edu
410-955-8725
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Nature Photonics
UCI team is first to capture motion of single molecule in real time
UC Irvine chemists have scored a scientific first: capturing moving images of a single molecule as it vibrates, or 'breathes,' and shifts from one quantum state to another.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tatiana Arizaga
tarizaga@uci.edu
949-824-0218
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
Study on global carbon cycle may require reappraisal of climate events in Earth's history
A recent study of the global carbon cycle offers a new perspective of Earth's climate records through time. Scientists at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science suggest that one of the current methods for interpreting ancient changes in the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and oceans may need to be re-evaluated.

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4704
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
Hey1 and Hey2 ensure inner ear 'hair cells' are made at the right time, in the right place
Two Johns Hopkins neuroscientists have discovered the 'molecular brakes' that time the generation of important cells in the inner ear cochleas of mice. These 'hair cells' translate sound waves into electrical signals that are carried to the brain and are interpreted as sounds. If the arrangement of the cells is disordered, hearing is impaired.
Whitehall Foundation, NIH/National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders

Contact: Catherine Kolf
ckolf@jhmi.edu
443-440-1929
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Nature
Water-based nuclear battery developed by MU can be used to generate electrical energy
From cell phones to cars and flashlights, batteries play an important role in everyday life. Scientists and technology companies constantly are seeking ways to improve battery life and efficiency. Now, for the first time using a water-based solution, researchers at the University of Missouri have created a long-lasting and more efficient nuclear battery that could be used for many applications such as a reliable energy source in automobiles and also in complicated applications such as space flight.

Contact: Jeff Sossamon
sossamonj@missouri.edu
573-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
Tornadoes occurring earlier in 'Tornado Alley'
Peak tornado activity in the central and southern Great Plains of the United States is occurring up to two weeks earlier than it did half a century ago, according to a new study whose findings could help states in 'Tornado Alley' better prepare for these violent storms.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
202-777-7524
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Rehabilitation Psychology
Kessler Foundation scientists link slowed processing speed with executive deficits in MS
Kessler Foundation researchers have published a study supporting the role of slowed processing speed in the executive deficits found in individuals with multiple sclerosis. 'Does slowed processing speed account for executive deficits in multiple sclerosis? Evidence from neuropsychological performance and structural neuroimaging,' was published online ahead of print on Aug. 18 by Rehabilitation Psychology. MS cognitive research should focus on two key domains -- processing speed and memory.
NIH/National Institute on Disability & Rehabilitation Research, National Institutes of Health, National MS Society

Contact: Carolann Murphy
cmurphy@kesslerfoundation.org
973-324-8382
Kessler Foundation

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
International Journal of Computational Vision and Robotics
Computerized emotion detector
Face recognition software measures various parameters in a mug shot, such as the distance between the person's eyes, the height from lip to top of their nose and various other metrics and then compares it with photos of people in the database that have been tagged with a given name. Now, research published in the International Journal of Computational Vision and Robotics looks to take that one step further in recognizing the emotion portrayed by a face.

Contact: Albert Ang
press@inderscience.com
Inderscience Publishers

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
Scientists twist radio beams to send data
Researchers twist four radio beams together to achieve high data transmission speeds.
Intel Labs University Research Office and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency Information in a Photon Program

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-740-9226
University of Southern California

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
EARTH Magazine: The Bay Area's next 'big one' could strike as a series of quakes
Most people are familiar with the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake and are aware of the earthquake risk posed to the Bay Area -- and much of California -- by the San Andreas Fault. Most people are not aware, however, that a cluster of large earthquakes struck the San Andreas and quite a few nearby faults in the 17th and 18th centuries.

Contact: Megan Sever
msever@earthmagazine.org
703-379-2480
American Geosciences Institute

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Topics in Cognitive Science
Artworks are people!
Art, in other words, is an extension of the creator, according to research from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business.

Contact: Ethan Grove
ethan.grove@chicagobooth.edu
773-834-5161
University of Chicago Booth School of Business

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Society & Natural Resources
Politics divide coastal residents' views of environment, UNH research finds
From the salmon-rich waters of Southeast Alaska to the white sand beaches of Florida's Gulf Coast to Downeast Maine's lobster, lumber and tourist towns, coastal residents around the US share a common characteristic: their views about coastal environments divide along political lines. That's a primary finding of a new study by University of New Hampshire sociologists published this month in the journal Society & Natural Resources.
USDA Rural Development program, US Environmental Protection Agency, National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, Ford Foundation, Kellogg Foundation, University of New Hampshire by the College of Liberal Arts

Contact: Beth Potier
beth.potier@unh.edu
603-862-1566
University of New Hampshire

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
For electronics beyond silicon, a new contender emerges
Using a quantum material called a correlated oxide, Harvard researchers have achieved a reversible change in electrical resistance of eight orders of magnitude, a result the researchers are calling 'colossal.' In short, they have engineered this material to perform comparably with the best silicon switches.
National Science Foundation, National Academy of Sciences

Contact: Caroline Perry
cperry@seas.harvard.edu
617-496-1351
Harvard University

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
eLife
Ebola outbreak 'out of all proportion' and severity cannot be predicted
A mathematical model that replicates Ebola outbreaks can no longer be used to ascertain the eventual scale of the current epidemic, finds research conducted by the University of Warwick. Dr. Thomas House, of the University's Warwick Mathematics Institute, developed a model that incorporated data from past outbreaks that successfully replicated their eventual scale.
Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

Contact: Tom Frew
a.t.frew@warwick.ac.uk
44-024-767-75910
University of Warwick

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Camera developed at WUSTL sheds light on mate choice of swordtail fish
A group of researchers have used a special camera developed by Viktor Gruev, PhD, to discover that female northern swordtail fish choose their mates based on polarization signals from the males.
Office of Naval Research, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, National Science Foundation

Contact: Julie Flory
Julie.Flory@WUSTL.EDU
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Odile knocking at US Southwest
Tropical Storm Odile continues to drench western Mexico and has now entered into the US Southwest. On Sept. 15, NASA's Terra satellite saw Odile's northernmost edge crossing the Mexican border into southern California. NOAA's GOES-East satellite on Sept. 16 showed Odile's outer bands were already bringing storms to southern Arizona.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
JAMA Psychiatry
Evidence of genetic link to PTSD in soldiers exposed to childhood trauma
While abnormalities in the adrenergic and noradrenergic systems, both integral in the fight-or-flight response, are thought to play a role in the development of post-traumatic stress disorder, until now there has been no genetic evidence of this connection. A latest study has found an interaction between the ADRB2 gene and childhood adversity. For individuals with two or more experiences of childhood trauma, such as abuse, genotype was associated with risk for adult PTSD symptoms.
Department of Defense

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Chemotherapy and SABR consecutively may be promising treatment option for advanced pancreatic cancer
For patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer, the combination of chemotherapy and stereotactic ablative radiation may be a promising treatment option, ultimately allowing them to undergo surgery that may not otherwise be an option, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 56th Annual Meeting.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology
Job stress not the only cause of burnouts at work
New research from Concordia University and the University of Montreal proves that having an understanding partner is just as important as having a supportive boss.

Contact: Cléa Desjardins
clea.desjardins@concordia.ca
51-484-824-245-068
Concordia University

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Applied Physics Letters
And so they beat on, flagella against the cantilever
Researchers have developed a new model to study the motion patterns of bacteria in real time and to determine how these motions relate to communication within a bacterial colony. They chemically attached colonies of E. coli bacteria to a microcantilever, coupling its motion to that of the bacteria. As the cantilever itself isn't doesn't generate any vibrations, or 'noise,' this allowed the researchers to monitor the colony's reactions to various stimuli in real time.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Cancer patients with malignant spinal cord compression have preserved mobility
Mobility is equally preserved in cancer patients suffering from malignant spinal cord compression who receive a single dose of 10 Gy of radiation therapy, compared to patients who receive five daily doses of 4 Gy of radiation therapy each, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's (ASTRO's) 56th Annual Meeting.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Single fraction RT as effective as multiple fraction RT for bone metastases
A prospective study that compared patient-reported outcomes of a broad set of cancer patients with bone metastases demonstrates that single fraction radiation therapy is equally as effective as multiple fraction radiation therapy when pain, function and quality of life are considered, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 56th Annual Meeting.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Long-term results of RTOG 0236 confirm good primary tumor control, positive 5-year survival rates
Patients with inoperable, early-stage lung cancer who receive stereotactic body radiation therapy have a five-year survival rate of 40 percent, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's (ASTRO's) 56th Annual Meeting.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Showing releases 126-150 out of 409.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>