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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 151-175 out of 406.

<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 > >>

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Cochrane Library
Only half of patients take their medications as prescribed
Here is what we know: If people take medications prescribed to them, they usually get better. But only about half of all patients prescribed medication take it according to directions. Here is what we don't know: We don't know how to get patients to take their medications, despite many studies looking at the issue.

Contact: Veronica McGuire
vmcguir@mcmaster.ca
90-552-591-402-2169
McMaster University

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
6th International Conference on Social Robotics
Theater arts research offers insight for designers, builders of robots
UT Arlington Theatre Arts research provides insight into human behavior for scientists, engineers who design and build social robots.

Contact: Bridget Lewis
blewis@uta.edu
817-272-3317
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Psychological Science
Study finds that rejecting unsuitable suitors is easier said than done
According to new research from the University of Toronto and Yale University, rejecting unsuitable romantic partners is easy in hypothetical situations, but not so when considering a face-to-face proposition.

Contact: Jessica Lewis
jessica.lewis@utoronto.ca
416-978-8887
University of Toronto

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Applied Physics Letters
New terahertz device could strengthen security
We are all familiar with the security hassles that accompany air travel. Now a new type of security detection that uses terahertz radiation is looking to prove its promise. Northwestern University researchers have developed a room temperature, compact, tunable terahertz source that could lead to advances in homeland security and space exploration. Able to detect explosives, chemical agents and dangerous biological substances from safe distances, devices using terahertz waves could make public spaces more secure than ever.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Homeland Security, Naval Air Systems Command, NASA

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Early Childhood Research Quarterly
Self-regulation intervention boosts school readiness of at-risk children, study shows
An intervention that uses music and games to help preschoolers learn self-regulation skills is helping prepare at-risk children for kindergarten, a new study from Oregon State University shows.
Ford Family Foundation

Contact: Megan McClelland
megan.mcclelland@oregonstate.edu
541-737-9225
Oregon State University

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
AIDS
Research shows anti-HIV medicines can cause damage to fetal hearts
Just-published findings in the journal AIDS raise concern about potential long-term harmful impact of 'antiretroviral therapy' on in-utero infants whose mothers are HIV-positive, but who are not infected with HIV themselves.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Julie O'Connor
julie.oconnor@wayne.edu
313-577-8845
Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Journal of the Botanical Research Institute of Texas
Rare new species of plant: Stachys caroliniana
University of South Carolina professor John Nelson knows you don't have to travel to a remote Amazon rainforest to discover a new species of plant. He and alumnus Douglas Rayner uncovered a rare hedge-nettle just 50 miles from Charleston, and they named it Stachys caroliniana, after the only state where it has been found.

Contact: Steven Powell
spowell2@mailbox.sc.edu
803-777-1923
University of South Carolina

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Obesity-attributable absenteeism among US workers costs the nation more than $8 billion annually
Obesity costs the US $8.65 billion per year as a result of absenteeism in the workplace -- more than 9 percent of all absenteeism costs. The consequences of obesity among the working population go beyond healthcare and create a financial challenge not only for the nation but for individual states as well. The study is the first to provide state-level estimates of obesity-attributable costs of absenteeism among working adults in the US.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
PLOS ONE
Next-door leopards: First GPS-collar study reveals how leopards live with people
In the first-ever GPS-based study of leopards in India, led by WCS and partners has delved into the secret lives of these big cats, and recorded their strategies to thrive in human-dominated areas.

Contact: Stephen Sautner
ssautner@wcs.org
718-220-3682
Wildlife Conservation Society

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
More genetic clues found in a severe food allergy
Scientists have identified four new genes associated with the severe food allergy eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Because the genes appear to have roles in other allergic diseases and in inflammation, the findings may point toward potential new treatments for EoE.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Defense, Food Phight for Eosinophilic Esophagitis, Adele S. and Daniel S. Kubert Estate

Contact: John Ascenzi
ascenzi@email.chop.edu
267-426-6055
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014
In landmark study of cell therapy for heart attack, more cells make a difference
Physicians from 60 sites treated 161 heart attack patients with their own bone marrow cells, selected for their healing potential and then reinjected into the heart, in an effort to improve the heart's recovery.

Contact: Quinn Eastman
qeastma@emory.edu
404-727-7829
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
eLife
Life's extremists may be an untapped source of antibacterial drugs
Life's extremists, a family of microbes called Archaea, may be an untapped source of new antibacterial drugs. That conclusion arises from the discovery of the first antibacterial gene in this ancient lineage.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: David Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Communication Research
Not all baseball stars treated equally in TV steroid coverage, says study of network news
Retired baseball stars Barry Bonds, Mark McGwire and Rafael Palmeiro each had Hall of Fame-worthy numbers, each hitting more than 500 home runs. All three also were tarred by allegations of steroid use. Their stories, however, received very different treatment over 12 years of national television news coverage, says University of Illinois professor Brian Quick, lead author on a paper about that coverage and its effects, published online Nov. 20 by the journal Communication Research.

Contact: Craig Chamberlain
cdchambe@illinois.edu
217-333-2894
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
2014 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology
Research examines an emerging issue: Treatment of transgendered prison populations
The perceptions and treatment of transgendered populations will be examined at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology.

Contact: Dawn Fuller
dawn.fuller@uc.edu
513-556-1823
University of Cincinnati

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Plant Journal
Researchers discover natural resistance gene against spruce budworm
Scientists from Université Laval, the University of British Columbia and the University of Oxford have discovered a natural resistance gene against spruce budworm in the white spruce. The breakthrough, reported in The Plant Journal, paves the way to identifying and selecting naturally resistant trees to replant forests devastated by the destructive pest.

Contact: Jean-François Huppé
jean-francois.huppe@dc.ulaval.ca
418-656-7785
Université Laval

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
HortScience
Polyethylene mulch, glazing create optimal conditions for soil solarization
Researchers raised soil temperatures in high tunnels in southern Arizona to determine the efficacy of soil solarization using clear mulch on the soil surface and with tunnel glazing or with no glazing. Outcomes showed that producers using high tunnels in the region can complete solarization in less than a week during summer when the soil is fallow using glazing on the high tunnel and polyethylene mulch on the soil surface.

Contact: Michael W. Neff
mwneff@ashs.org
703-836-4606
American Society for Horticultural Science

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
HortScience
Vermicompost leachate improves tomato seedling growth
A study assessed growth performance of tomato seedlings treated with vermicompost-leachate (VCL), an organic liquid produced from earthworm-digested material. Seedlings were subjected to various temperature and watering regimes. Results showed that VCL can be a suitable soil amendment product to improve overall soil fertility and growth of tomato plants, even under temperature and water stress conditions.

Contact: Michael W. Neff
mwneff@ashs.org
703-836-4606
American Society for Horticultural Science

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Academy of Management Journal
Trouble with your boss? Own it
Don't get along with your boss? Your job performance may actually improve if the two of you can come to grips with the poor relationship.

Contact: Andy Henion
henion@msu.edu
517-355-3294
Michigan State University

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Gastroenterology
Update on new treatments for liver diseases
Cirrhosis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease are two serious liver conditions with limited pharmacological treatments. The December issues of AGA's journals -- Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology and Gastroenterology -- highlight important updates into treatments for these two debilitating diseases.

Contact: Rachel Steigerwald
media@gastro.org
301-272-1603
American Gastroenterological Association

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering
Researchers study impact of power prosthetic failures on amputees
Powered lower limb prosthetics hold promise for improving the mobility of amputees, but errors in the technology may also cause some users to stumble or fall. New research examines exactly what happens when these technologies fail, with the goal of developing a new generation of more robust powered prostheses.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Defense, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Value in Health
New model of follow up for breast cancer patients
Public health researchers from the University of Adelaide have evaluated international breast cancer guidelines, finding that there is potential to improve surveillance of breast cancer survivors from both a patient and health system perspective.

Contact: Jon Karnon
jonathan.karnon@adelaide.edu.au
61-883-133-562
University of Adelaide

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
ESMO Symposium on Immuno-Oncology 2014 -Geneva, 21-22 November
Annals of Oncology
Immune checkpoint inhibitors may work in brain cancers
New evidence that immune checkpoint inhibitors may work in glioblastoma and brain metastases presented at the ESMO Symposium on Immuno-Oncology 2014 in Geneva, Switzerland.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
ESMO Symposium on Immuno-Oncology 2014 -Geneva, 21-22 November
Annals of Oncology
Possibilities for personalized vaccines revealed at ESMO symposium
The possibilities for personalized vaccines in all types of cancer are revealed today at the ESMO Symposium on Immuno-Oncology 2014 in Geneva, Switzerland.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Type 2 diabetes: Added benefit of canagliflozin plus metformin is not proven
As in the first dossier assessment of canagliflozin, the drug manufacturer provided no suitable data for the fixed combination with metformin either.

Contact: Dr. Anna-Sabine Ernst
presse@iqwig.de
49-022-135-6850
Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
A coating that protects against heat and oxidation
Researchers have developed a coating technique that they plan to use to protect turbine engine and waste incinerator components against heat and oxidation. A topcoat from micro-scaled hollow aluminum oxide spheres provides heat insulation, in the lab, already proved more economical than conventional techniques.

Contact: Dr. Vladislav Kolarik
vladislav.kolarik@ict.fraunhofer.de
49-721-464-0147
Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft

Showing releases 151-175 out of 406.

<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 > >>