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Showing releases 151-175 out of 470.

<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 > >>

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
ACS Nano
NIST offers electronics industry 2 ways to snoop on self-organizing molecules
The idea of a practical manufacturing process based on getting molecules to organize themselves in useful nanoscale shapes once seemed a little fantastic. Now the day isn't far off when your cell phone may depend on it. Two recent papers by researchers at NIST, MIT and IBM demonstrate complementary approaches to 3-D imaging of nanoscale polymer patterns for use in semiconductor lithography.

Contact: Michael Baum
michael.baum@nist.gov
301-975-2763
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Neuron
Bipolar disorder discovery at the nano level
A nano-sized discovery by Northwestern Medicine scientists helps explain how bipolar disorder affects the brain and could one day lead to new drug therapies to treat the mental illness.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Marie Curie Outgoing Postdoctoral Fellowship

Contact: Erin White
ewhite@northwestern.edu
847-491-4888
Northwestern University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice
No silver bullet: ISU study identifies risk factors of youth charged with murder
News of a school shooting or a homicide involving a teenage suspect always leads to the question of why? It is human nature to want an explanation or someone to blame, and policymakers try to pinpoint a cause in an effort to prevent it from happening again. But too often, the speculation or rush to judgment clouds reality, said Matt DeLisi, a professor of sociology and criminal justice at Iowa State University.

Contact: Matt DeLisi
delisi@iastate.edu
515-294-8008
Iowa State University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Chemical Physical Letters
New insights on carbonic acid in water
A new study by Berkeley Lab researchers provides valuable new insight into aqueous carbonic acid with important implications for both geological and biological concerns.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Science Translational Medicine
A real-time tracking system developed to monitor dangerous bacteria inside the body
Combining a PET scanner with a new chemical tracer that selectively tags specific types of bacteria, Johns Hopkins researchers working with mice report they have devised a way to detect and monitor in real time infections with dangerous Gram-negative bacteria. These increasingly drug-resistant bacteria are responsible for a range of diseases, including fatal pneumonias and various bloodstream or solid-organ infections acquired in and outside the hospital.
National Institutes of Health, Harvard University Center for AIDS Research

Contact: Ekaterina Pesheva
epeshev1@jhmi.edu
410-502-9433
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Finding durable foul-release coatings to control invasive mussel attachment
The Bureau of Reclamation has released a report summarizing six years of testing coatings to control the attachment of quagga and zebra mussels to water and power facilities. Since the study began in 2008, Reclamation has tested more than 100 coatings and materials.
Bureau of Reclaimation

Contact: Peter Soeth
psoeth@usbr.gov
303-445-3615
Bureau of Reclamation

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Journal of Bone & Mineral Research
Paralyzed patients have weaker bones and a higher risk of fractures than expected
People paralyzed by spinal cord injuries lose mechanical strength in their leg bones faster, and more significantly, than previously believed, putting them at greater risk for fractures from minor stresses, according to a study by researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. The results suggest that physicians should begin therapies for such patients sooner to maintain bone mass and strength, and should think beyond standard bone density tests when assessing fracture risk in osteoporosis patients.

Contact: Michael Cohen
mcohen@wpi.edu
508-868-4778
Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Tropical Depression 9 forms in Gulf of Mexico
Tropical Depression 9 formed over the western Bay of Campeche, Gulf of Mexico and is forecast to make a quick landfall on Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's GOES-East Satellite captured the birth of the depression.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
NASA's Terra Satellite sees wind shear affecting Tropical Storm Ana
Tropical Storm Ana was being battered by wind shear when NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead and saw the bulk of showers and thunderstorms pushed north and east of the center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Neuron
New ALS-associated gene identified using innovative strategy
Using an innovative exome sequencing strategy, a team of international scientists led by John Landers, Ph.D., at the University of Massachusetts Medical School has shown that TUBA4A, the gene encoding the Tubulin Alpha 4A protein, is associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a fatal neurological disorder also known as Lou Gehrig's disease.

Contact: Jim Fessenden
james.fessenden@umassmed.edu
508-856-2000
University of Massachusetts Medical School

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
NASA's TRMM Satellite calculates Hurricanes Fay and Gonzalo rainfall
NASA used TRMM and other satellite data to calculate rainfall from Atlantic hurricanes Fay and Gonzalo.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Optics Letters
New 3-D display technology promises greater energy efficiency
New today in Optics Letters, researchers have devised an ultra-thin LCD screen that operates without a power source, making it a compact, energy-efficient way to display visual information. The technology may one day have applications in products such as e-book readers, flexible displays or as a security measure on credit cards.

Contact: Lyndsay Meyer
lmeyer@osa.org
202-416-1435
The Optical Society

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Baker Institute paper: Data indicate there is no immigration crisis
Is there an 'immigration crisis' on the US-Mexico border? Not according to an examination of historical immigration data, according to a new paper from Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy.

Contact: Jeff Falk
jfalk@rice.edu
713-348-6775
Rice University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
BioScience
New tool identifies high-priority dams for fish survival
Scientists have identified 181 California dams that may need to increase water flows to protect native fish downstream. The screening tool, developed by the Center for Watershed Sciences at the University of California, Davis, to select 'high-priority' dams may be particularly useful during drought years amid competing demands for water.
Natural Resources Defense Council, California Trout, Trout Unlimited, the S.D. Bechtel Jr. Foundation, and the California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research program

Contact: Ted Grantham
tgrantham@usgs.gov
970-226-9386
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
BioScience
Some scientists share better than others
Some scientists share better than others. While astronomers and geneticists embrace the concept, the culture of ecology still has a ways to go. Research by Michigan State University, published in the current issue of BioScience, explores the paradox that although ecologists share findings via scientific journals, they do not share the data on which the studies are built, said Patricia Soranno, MSU fisheries and wildlife professor and co-author of the paper.

Contact: Layne Cameron
layne.cameron@cabs.msu.edu
517-353-8819
Michigan State University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Obesity Surgery
How people view their own weight influences bariatric surgery success
Negative feelings about one's own weight, known as internalized weight bias, influence the success people have after undergoing weight loss surgery, according to research appearing in the journal Obesity Surgery, published by Springer. The study, from the Geisinger Health System in the US, is considered the first and only study to examine internalized weight bias in relation to post-surgical weight loss success in adults.
Living Heart Foundation

Contact: Joan Robinson
joan.robinson@springer.com
49-622-148-78130
Springer

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Nature Geoscience
Researchers resolve the Karakoram glacier anomaly, a cold case of climate science
Researchers from Princeton University and other institutions may have hit upon an answer to a climate-change puzzle that has eluded scientists for years, namely why glaciers in the Karakoram range of the Himalayas have remained stable and even increased in mass while glaciers nearby and worldwide have been receding. Understanding the 'Karakoram anomaly' could help gauge the future availability of water for hundreds of millions of people.

Contact: Morgan Kelly
mgnkelly@princeton.edu
609-258-5729
Princeton University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology
Expert recommendations for diagnosing pediatric acute onset neuropsychiatric syndrome
A panel of leading clinicians and researchers across various general and specialty pediatric fields developed a consensus statement recommending how to evaluate youngsters in whom neuropsychiatric symptoms suddenly develop, including the abrupt, dramatic onset of obsessive-compulsive disorder. This difficult diagnosis is typically made by pediatricians or other primary care clinicians and child psychiatrists, who will benefit from the guidance provided in the recommendations published in Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
kryan@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Social Science Research
The unexpected benefits of adjustable rate mortgages
As would be expected during a time of consumer deleveraging, households applied more than 70 percent of their mortgage savings to reducing outstanding credit card debts. Not only did the lower payments reduce mortgage defaults but credit card delinquencies fell. 'These choices had significant impact on foreclosures, house prices and employment in regions that were more exposed to interest rate declines,' the researchers concluded.

Contact: Susan Guibert
susan.guibert@chicagobooth.edu
773-702-9232
University of Chicago Booth School of Business

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Steadily rising increases in mitochondrial DNA mutations cause abrupt shifts in disease
New work by a pioneering scientist details how subtle changes in mitochondrial function may cause a broad range of common metabolic and degenerative diseases. Mitochondria are tiny energy-producing structures within our cells that contain their own DNA.
National Insitutes of Health, Simons Foundation

Contact: John Ascenzi
ascenzi@email.chop.edu
267-426-6055
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Child Development
Early intervention could boost education levels
Taking steps from an early age to improve childhood education skills could raise overall population levels of academic achievement by as much as 5 percent, and reduce socioeconomic inequality in education by 15 percent, according to international research led by the University of Adelaide.
National Health and Medical Research Council

Contact: Catherine Chittleborough
catherine.chittleborough@adelaide.edu.au
61-883-131-684
University of Adelaide

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
New study shows that shifting precipitation patterns affect tea flavor, health compounds
New research shows that major antioxidant compounds that determine tea health properties and taste fell up to 50 percent during an extreme monsoon.

Contact: Evelyn Boswell
evelynb@montana.edu
406-994-5135
Montana State University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
BMC Infectious Diseases
Lessons from the 'Spanish flu,' nearly 100 years later
Just in time for flu season, a new Michigan State University study of 'the mother of all pandemics' could offer insight into infection control measures for the flu and other epidemic diseases.

Contact: Kristen Parker
kristen.parker@cabs.msu.edu
517-353-8942
Michigan State University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Nature
Fast modeling of cancer mutations
A new genome-editing technique enables rapid analysis of genes mutated in tumors.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ludwig Center for Molecular Oncology at MIT, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
American Journal of Public Health
Indiana Project screenings show need for more mental health services in youth detention
Indiana is at the forefront of providing mental health screening and services to juvenile offenders, but more efforts are needed to improve the services provided to detained youths, according to Indiana University School of Medicine research findings published in the October issue of the American Journal of Public Health.

Contact: Mary Hardin
mhardin@iu.edu
317-274-5456
Indiana University

Showing releases 151-175 out of 470.

<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 > >>