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Showing releases 176-200 out of 400.

<< < 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 > >>

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Nature
In autoimmune diseases, researchers pinpoint genetic risks, cellular culprits
Scores of autoimmune diseases afflicting one in 12 Americans -- ranging from type 1 diabetes, to multiple sclerosis, to rheumatoid arthritis, to asthma -- mysteriously cause the immune system to harm tissues within our own bodies. Now, a new study pinpoints the complex genetic origins for many of these diseases, a discovery that may lead to better diagnosis and ultimately to improved treatments.
National Institutes of Health, National Multiple Sclerosis Society

Contact: Pete Farley
peter.farley@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Science Translational Medicine
New molecular imaging technology could improve bladder-cancer detection
Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have developed a new strategy that they say could detect bladder cancer with more accuracy and sensitivity than standard endoscopy methods. Endoscopy refers to a procedure in which surgeons use an instrument equipped with a lens to see inside the patient.

Contact: Krista Conger
kristac@stanford.edu
650-725-5371
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Affordable Care Act Medicare payment reforms improve patient experiences
Patients enrolled in Accountable Care Organizations reported improved experiences with care compared to the overall Medicare population.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, John and Laura Arnold Foundation, Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, Beeson Career Development Program

Contact: David Cameron
david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu
617-432-0441
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Nature
New way of genome editing cures hemophilia in mice; may be safer than older method
The ability to pop a working copy of a faulty gene into a patient's genome is a tantalizing goal for many clinicians treating genetic diseases. Now, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have devised a new way to carry out this genetic sleight of hand.

Contact: Krista Conger
kristac@stanford.edu
650-725-5371
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Nature
Autism's genetic architecture comes into focus
A genetic autism study of unprecedented scope and power has uncovered more than two-dozen high-confidence risk genes for the disorder. It offers compelling evidence that spontaneous, or de novo, mutations contribute to autism in at least 27 percent of families in which the parents and siblings are unaffected.
Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Anastasia Greenebaum
agreenebaum@simonsfoundation.org
212-524-6097
Simons Foundation

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Nature
Scripps Research Institute scientists make enzyme that could help explain origins of life
Mimicking natural evolution in a test tube, scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have devised an enzyme with a unique property that might have been crucial to the origin of life on Earth. Aside from illuminating one possible path for life's beginnings, the achievement is likely to yield a powerful tool for evolving new and useful molecules.
NASA, The Simons Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Nature
Planet-forming lifeline discovered in a binary star system
For the first time, researchers using ALMA have detected a streamer of gas flowing from a massive outer disc toward the inner reaches of a binary star system. This never-before-seen feature may be responsible for sustaining a second, smaller disc of planet-forming material that otherwise would have disappeared long ago. Half of Sun-like stars are born in binary systems, meaning that these findings will have major consequences for the hunt for exoplanets.

Contact: Richard Hook
rhook@eso.org
49-893-200-6655
ESO

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
New frog discovered inhabiting I-95 corridor from Connecticut to North Carolina
More than a half century after claims that a new frog species existed in New York and New Jersey were dismissed, a Rutgers researcher and team of scientists have proven that the frog is living in wetlands from Connecticut to North Carolina and are naming it after the ecologist who first noticed it.

Contact: Robin Lally
rlally@ucm.rutgers.edu
732-932-0557
Rutgers University

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Nature
Molecular map reveals genetic origins of 21 autoimmune diseases
Scientists have created a molecular map that pinpoints genetic variants that play a role in 21 different autoimmune diseases, they report Oct. 29 in the journal Nature.
National Institutes of Health, National Multiple Sclerosis Society

Contact: Bill Hathaway
william.hathaway@yale.edu
203-432-1322
Yale University

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
BJU International
Prostate cancer medications linked with increased risk of heart-related deaths in men with cardiovascular problems
A new study has found that certain prostate cancer medications are linked with an increased risk of dying from heart-related causes in men with congestive heart failure or prior heart attacks. Published in BJU International, the findings will help doctors and patients weigh the benefits and risks of the drugs.

Contact: Evelyn Martinez
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
201-748-6358
Wiley

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Four years in, payment model lowers medical spending, improves care
Enrollees in a Massachusetts global budget health care plan had smaller increases in medical spending and larger increases in quality of care over the first four years of the contract when compared to similar individuals in other states.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, National Bureau of Economic Research Fellowship in Aging and Health Economics, Charles H. Hood Foundation

Contact: David Cameron
david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu
617-432-0441
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
ECG on the run: Continuous ECG surveillance of marathon athletes is feasible
The condition of an athlete's heart has for the first time been accurately monitored throughout the duration of a marathon race. The real-time monitoring was achieved by continuous electrocardiogram (ECG) surveillance and data transfer over the public mobile phone network to a telemedicine center along the marathon route. This new development in cardiac testing in endurance athletes, said investigators, 'would allow instantaneous diagnosis of potentially fatal rhythm disorders.'

Contact: Jacqueline Partarrieu
press@escardio.org
33-492-947-756
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
New leopard frog species discovered in New York
Scientists discover a new species of leopard frog from New York City and surrounding region.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Nature
Research team identifies 33 genes that contribute to autism risk
The list of genes identified with autism spectrum disorder by deep DNA sequencing has expanded from nine to 33, according to a new study by an international research team led by the Autism Sequencing Consortium, including Carnegie Mellon University's Kathryn Roeder and the University of Pittsburgh's Bernie Devlin. Published today in Nature, the study examined data on several types of rare, genetic differences in more than 14,000 DNA samples from parents, affected children and unrelated individuals.

Contact: Shilo Rea
shilo@cmu.edu
412-268-6094
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
168th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America
Why some butterflies sound like ants
Ant nests can offer a lot to organisms other than just ants. They are well-protected, environmentally-stable and resource-rich spaces -- in many ways everything a tiny creature could ask for in a home. For the insects that squat inside ant nests, though, survival means finding ways to live with the ants -- by foiling the chemical cues ants use to distinguish friend from foe, for instance.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
Acoustical Society of America

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association
Diets high in fruit, vegetables, whole grains and nuts among factors to lower first-time stroke risk
Eating Mediterranean or DASH-style diets, regularly engaging in physical activity and keeping your blood pressure under control can lower your risk of a first-time stroke. Updated prevention guidelines also focus on lowering stroke risk among women.

Contact: Darcy Spitz
darcy.spitz@heart.org
212-878-5940
American Heart Association

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
168th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America
Urban seismic network detects human sounds
When listening to the Earth, what clues can seismic data reveal about the impact of urban life? Although naturally occurring vibrations have proven useful to seismologists, until now the vibrations caused by humans haven't been explored in any real depth. Scripps Institution of Oceanography researchers Nima Riahi and Peter Gerstoft will describe their efforts to tap into an urban seismic network to monitor the traffic of trains, planes, automobiles and other modes of human transport.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
Acoustical Society of America

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
168th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America
Hearing loss in one infant twin affects mother's speech to both babies
Is it possible that hearing loss in one infant from a pair of twins can affect the mother's speech to both infants? A new acoustics study zeroes in on this question and suggests that not only is this alteration of speech entirely possible, but that mothers speak to both infants as if they are hearing impaired.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
Acoustical Society of America

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
168th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America
The science of charismatic voices
When a right-wing Italian politician named Umberto Bossi suffered a severe stroke in 2004, his speech became permanently impaired. Strangely, this change impacted Bossi's perception among his party's followers -- from appearing authoritarian to benevolent. Now researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles think they know why.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
Acoustical Society of America

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
168th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America
Nestling birds struggle in noisy environments
Unable to fly, nestling birds depend on their parents for both food and protection: vocal communication between parents and offspring helps young birds to determine when they should beg for food and when they should crouch in the nest to avoid a predator seeking an easy meal. A group of researchers has found that ambient, anthropomorphic noise -- from traffic, construction and other human activities -- can break this vital communications link, leaving nestlings vulnerable or hungry.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
Acoustical Society of America

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Journal of Experimental Biology
Running robots of future may learn from world's best 2-legged runners: Birds
With an eye toward making better running robots, researchers have made surprising new findings about some of nature's most energy efficient bipeds -- running birds. Their skills may have evolved from the time of the dinosaurs and they may now be superior to any other bipedal runners -- including humans.
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, Human Frontier Science Program

Contact: Jonathan Hurst
jonathan.hurst@oregonstate.edu
541-737-7010
Oregon State University

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Radiology
Stanford study finds brain abnormalities in chronic fatigue patients
An imaging study by Stanford University School of Medicine investigators has found distinct differences between the brains of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome and those of healthy people.

Contact: Bruce Goldman
goldmanb@stanford.edu
650-725-2106
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
2014 Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons
Breast and colorectal cancers remain more aggressive in children
Breast and colorectal cancers rarely occur in children, but when they do, these conditions are more precarious, according to a pair of National Cancer Data Base studies presented this week at the 2014 Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons.

Contact: Sally Garneski
pressinquiry@facs.org
312-202-5409
American College of Surgeons

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Current Biology
Liberal or conservative? Reactions to disgust are a dead giveaway
The way a person's brain responds to a single disgusting image is enough to reliably predict whether he or she identifies politically as liberal or conservative. As we approach Election Day, the researchers say that the findings reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on Oct. 30 come as a reminder of something we all know but probably don't always do: 'Think, don't just react.'

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Radiology
MRI identifies brain abnormalities in chronic fatigue syndrome patients
Researchers using a combination of different imaging techniques have found structural abnormalities in the brains of people with chronic fatigue syndrome, according to a new study. The results suggest a potential role for imaging in diagnosing and treating the condition.
Division of Infectious Disease CFS Fund

Contact: Linda Brooks
lbrooks@rsna.org
630-590-7762
Radiological Society of North America

Showing releases 176-200 out of 400.

<< < 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 > >>