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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 176-200 out of 326.

<< < 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 > >>

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
JAMA
Collaborative care improves depression in teens
How best to care for the many adolescents who have depression? In a collaborative care intervention, a care manager continually reached out to teens -- delivering and following up on treatment in a primary-care setting. Depression outcomes after a year were significantly better with this approach than with usual care, according to a JAMA report of a randomized controlled trial from Seattle Children's, Group Health, and the University of Washington.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Rose Ibarra (Egge)
rose.ibarra@seattlechildrens.org
206-987-7334
Group Health Research Institute

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Scientific Reports
Methadone treatment suppresses testosterone in opioid addicts
The study found men using methadone, which is used for opioid addiction treatment, have significantly suppressed testosterone levels of about a quarter of the testosterone of men not using opioids. In women using methadone for addiction treatment, testosterone levels were not significantly impacted, even considering the menstrual cycle. Treating testosterone deficiency will improve outcomes of methadone treatment for patients.

Contact: Veronica McGuire
vmcguir@mcmaster.ca
90-552-591-402-2169
McMaster University

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
mBio
Common European MRSA originated in Africa
The predominant strain of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infecting people in Europe, the Middle East and northern Africa derived from a single sub-Saharan ancestor, a team of international researchers reported this week in mBio, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

Contact: Jim Sliwa
jsliwa@asmusa.org
202-942-9297
American Society for Microbiology

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Journal of Royal Society Interface
Sheepdogs use simple rules to herd sheep
Sheepdogs use just two simple rules to round up large herds of sheep, scientists have discovered.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Tamera Jones
tane@nerc.ac.uk
07-917-557-215
Natural Environment Research Council

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
JAMA
EPO: Protecting the brains of very preterm infants
Premature babies are far more at risk than infants born at term of developing brain damage resulting in neurodevelopmental delay that may persist throughout their lives. A team of specialists in infant brain imaging from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Geneva and the University Hospital of Geneva has demonstrated the following: administering three doses of erythropoietin.

Contact: Petra S. Hüppi
petra.huppi@unige.ch
41-795-532-606
Université de Genève

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
JAMA
Study questions generalizability of findings of CV trials for heart attack patients
An analysis of a cardiovascular registry finds that of clinical trials that included heart attack patients, participation among eligible patients was infrequent and has been declining, and trial participants had a lower risk profile and a more favorable prognosis compared with the broader population of patients who have had a heart attack, according to a study in the Aug. 27 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Heidi Singer
Heidi.Singer@utoronto.ca
416-978-5811
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
JAMA
EPO may help reduce risk of brain abnormalities in preterm infants
High-dose erythropoietin administered within 42 hours of birth to preterm infants was associated with a reduced risk of brain injury, as indicated by magnetic resonance imaging, according to a study in the Aug. 27 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Petra Susan Huppi, M.D.
petra.huppi@hcuge.ch
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
JAMA
Collaborative care intervention improves depression among teens
Among adolescents with depression seen in primary care, a collaborative care intervention that included patient and parent engagement and education resulted in greater improvement in depressive symptoms at 12 months than usual care, according to a study in the Aug. 27 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Rose Ibarra
rose.ibarra@seattlechildrens.org
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
JAMA
Hypertension self-management program helps reduce blood pressure for high-risk patients
Among patients with hypertension at high risk of cardiovascular disease, a program that consisted of patients measuring their blood pressure and adjusting their antihypertensive medication accordingly resulted in lower systolic blood pressure at 12 months compared to patients who received usual care, according to a study in the Aug. 27 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Richard J. McManus
richard.mcmanus@phc.ox.ac.uk
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
BJU International
US has seen widespread adoption of robot-assisted cancer surgery to remove the prostate
A new study reveals that the US has experienced widespread adoption of robot-assisted prostate removal surgery to treat prostate cancer in recent years. The BJU International study also found that while such surgeries are more expensive than traditional surgeries, their costs are decreasing over time.

Contact: Evelyn Martinez
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
201-748-6358
Wiley

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Brain benefits from weight loss following bariatric surgery
Weight loss surgery can curb alterations in brain activity associated with obesity and improve cognitive function involved in planning, strategizing and organizing, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Contact: Jenni Glenn Gingery
jgingery@endocrine.org
202-971-3655
The Endocrine Society

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
PLOS Medicine
Challenges ahead in improving child health by increasing access to sanitation in India
A study published in this week's PLOS Medicine on large-scale rural sanitation programs in India highlights challenges in achieving sufficient access to latrines and reduction in open defecation to yield significant health benefits for young children.
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Contact: Maya Sandler
medicinepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
New estrogen-based compound suppresses binge-like eating behavior in female mice
Researchers at the USDA/ARS Children's Nutrition Research Center at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital found that the hormone estrogen can specifically trigger brain serotonin neurons to inhibit binge eating in female mice in a report today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, American Diabetes Association

Contact: Glenna Picton
picton@bcm.edu
713-798-4710
Baylor College of Medicine

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Environmental Research Letters
Existing power plants will spew 300 billion more tons of carbon dioxide during use
Existing power plants around the world will pump out more than 300 billion tons of carbon dioxide over their expected lifetimes, significantly adding to atmospheric levels of the climate-warming gas, according to UC Irvine and Princeton University scientists.

Contact: Tom Vasich
tmvasich@uci.edu
949-824-6455
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Alcoholics have an abnormal CD8 T cell response to the influenza virus
Chronic drinking is associated with an increased incidence and severity of respiratory infections. A reduced CD8 T cell response was previously implicated in increased disease severity due to influenza virus infections. New rodent findings indicate that only some CD8 T cell functions are damaged while others remain intact.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kevin L. Legge
kevin-legge@uiowa.edu
319-335-6744
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Prenatal alcohol exposure is associated with later excess weight/obesity during adolescence
Growth deficiency is a defining feature of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD). A new study has found that rates of excess weight/obesity are elevated in adolescents with partial fetal alcohol syndrome (pFAS). Females with FASD may be at a greater risk for excess weight/obesity than males during adolescence.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jeffrey R. Wozniak, Ph.D.
jwozniak@umn.edu
612-273-9741
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Young children's sipping/tasting of alcohol reflects parental modeling
A new study examines antecedent predictors of childhood initiation of sipping or tasting alcohol. Findings indicate that initiation of sipping/tasting was less related to psychosocial proneness for problem behavior and more related to perceived parental approval for child sipping.
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Contact: John E. Donovan, Ph.D.
donovanje@upmc.edu
412-246-6950
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Radiology
Wii Balance Board induces changes in the brains of MS patients
A balance board accessory for a popular video game console can help people with multiple sclerosis (MS) reduce their risk of accidental falls, according to new research. Magnetic resonance imaging scans showed that use of the Nintendo Wii Balance Board system appears to induce favorable changes in brain connections associated with balance and movement.

Contact: Linda Brooks
lbrooks@rsna.org
630-590-7762
Radiological Society of North America

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Neuronal activation by acupuncture at Yongquan and sham acupoints for DOC: A PET study
Hao Zhang and colleagues from China Rehabilitation Research Center found that acupuncture at the Yongquan acupoints induced stronger neuronal activity than acupuncture at the sham acupoints shown on positron emission tomography.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Molecular regulation of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage
Dr. Lijun Yang and co-workers from Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University in China prepared whole brain slices from a rat model of oxygen-glucose deprivation and explored dynamic expression pattern of Olig1 during hypoxic-ischemic brain damage and after miRNA-9 transfection.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Unusual neural connection between injured cingulum and brainstem in a SAH patients
Dr. Sung Ho Jang and team from College of Medicine, Yeungnam University in Korea report on a patient who showed unusual neural connections between injured cingulums and brainstem cholinergic nuclei following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, using diffusion tensor tractography.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Nature Medicine
Eye implant developed at Stanford could lead to better glaucoma treatments
Lowering internal eye pressure is currently the only way to treat glaucoma. A tiny eye implant developed by Stephen Quake's lab could pair with a smartphone to improve the way doctors measure and lower a patient's eye pressure.

Contact: Bjorn Carey
bccarey@stanford.edu
650-725-1944
Stanford University

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Duality principle is 'safe and sound'
Decades of experiments have verified the quirky laws of quantum theory again and again. So when scientists in Germany announced in 2012 an apparent violation of a fundamental law of quantum mechanics, a physicist at the University of Rochester was determined to find an explanation.
Canada Excellence Research Chairs Program, Fonds de recherche Nature et technologies

Contact: David Barnstone
dbarnsto@ur.rochester.edu
631-835-2012
University of Rochester

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Oncotarget
Finding keys to glioblastoma therapeutic resistance
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have found one of the keys to why certain glioblastomas -- the primary form of a deadly brain cancer -- are resistant to drug therapy. The answer lies not in the DNA sequence of the tumor, but in its epigenetic signature. These findings have been published online as a priority report in the journal Oncotarget.
Sontag Foundation, Burroughs Wellcome Foundation, Kimmel Foundation, Doris Duke Foundation, Forbeck Foundation

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
High insulin levels tied to obesity pathway, new UT Southwestern research shows
UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified a crucial link between high levels of insulin and pathways that lead to obesity, a finding that may have important implications when treating diabetes.

Contact: Russell Rian
russell.rian@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Showing releases 176-200 out of 326.

<< < 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 > >>