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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 176-200 out of 348.

<< < 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 > >>

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Obesity
Genetics explain why some boys and girls are bigger than others
The influence of genetic factors on differences between children's Body Mass Index increases from 43 percent at age four to 82 percent at age 10, reports a new study by researchers at University College London and King's College London. The researchers studied 2,556 pairs of twins from the Twins Early Development Study. Data were collected in England and Wales in 1999 and 2005 when the twins were four and 10 years old respectively.
United Kingdom Medical Research Council, Wellcome Trust, Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Contact: Harry Dayantis
h.dayantis@ucl.ac.uk
44-203-108-3844
University College London

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Nature
Quality control guidelines for genomics studies
How do doctors pinpoint the genetic changes that really cause disease? A policy paper proposes guidelines for researchers studying the effects of rare genetic variants. The recommendations focus on several key areas, such as study design, gene- and variant-level implication, databases and implications for diagnosis.
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Contact: Quinn Eastman
qeastma@emory.edu
404-727-7829
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Nature
New target for prostate cancer resistant to anti-hormone therapies
Researchers have found a new target that could remain sensitive even when prostate cancer becomes resistant to current treatments.
Prostate Cancer Foundation, NIH/National Cancer Institute, Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, American Cancer Society

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Diabetes Care
Community-based weight loss program aids diabetes management
A University of California, San Diego School of Medicine randomized controlled trial of obese adults with type 2 diabetes suggests that participants enrolled in a community-based structured weight loss program are able to shed more pounds, improve blood sugar control and reduce or eliminate insulin use and other medications compared to a control group.
Jenny Craig, Inc.

Contact: Yadira Galindo
ygalindo@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
PLOS ONE
Scientists discover a new shape using rubber bands
While experimenting with elastic strips, Harvard researchers have stumbled upon a surprising discovery: a hemihelix with multiple perversions, a shape rarely seen in nature.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Paul Karoff
karoff@seas.harvard.edu
617-496-0450
Harvard University

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
PLOS ONE
Stem cells in circulating blood affect cardiovascular health, study finds
New research suggests that attempts to isolate an elusive adult stem cell from blood to understand and potentially improve cardiovascular health -- a task considered possible but very difficult -- might not be necessary.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Nicanor Moldovan
Moldovan.6@osu.edu
614-247-7801
Ohio State University

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Study shows aspirin can reduce colorectal cancer risks for those with specific gene
The humble aspirin may have just added another beneficial effect beyond its ability to ameliorate headaches and reduce the risk of heart attacks: lowering colon cancer risk among people with high levels of a specific type of gene.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Amanda Petrak
amanda.petrak@case.edu
216-317-7347
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Genome Research
Hundreds of genetic mutations found in healthy blood of a supercentenarian
Genetic mutations are commonly studied because of links to diseases such as cancer; however, little is known about mutations occurring in healthy individuals. In a study published online in Genome Research, researchers detected over 400 mutations in healthy blood cells of a 115-year-old woman, suggesting that lesions at these sites are largely harmless over the course of a lifetime.
National Institutes of Health, Life Technologies, Scripps Health Dickinson Fellowship

Contact: Laura DeMare
ldemare@cshl.edu
516-422-4012
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Journal of Athletic Training
New study finds 2.5 million basketball injuries to high school athletes in 6 seasons
A recently published study by researchers in the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children's Hospital is the first to compare and describe the occurrence and distribution patterns of basketball-related injuries treated in emergency departments and the high school athletic training setting among adolescents and teens.

Contact: Gina Bericchia
MediaRelations@NationwideChildrens.org
614-355-0487
Nationwide Children's Hospital

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Journal of the American Heart Association
Marijuana use may increase heart complications in young, middle-aged adults
Marijuana use may result in heart-related complications in young and middle-aged adults. Nearly 2 percent of the health complications from marijuana use reported were cardiovascular related. A quarter of these complications resulted in death, according to a French study.

Contact: Karen Astle
Karen.Astle@heart.org
214-706-1392
American Heart Association

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
PLOS ONE
Scientists discover a new shape using rubber bands
Rubber bands may provide important clues for fabricating a variety of 3-D shapes from flat parts.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
415-590-3558
PLOS

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
PLOS ONE
'Off-the-shelf' equipment used to digitize insects in 3-D
Scientists have developed a cost-effective, off-the-shelf system to obtain natural-color 3-D models of insects.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
415-590-3558
PLOS

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
PLOS ONE
Citizen scientists match research tool when counting sharks
Shark data collected by citizen scientists may be as reliable as data collected using automated tools.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
415-590-3558
PLOS

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Nature
From liability to viability: Genes on the Y chromosome prove essential for male survival
The human Y chromosome has over the course of millions of years of evolution preserved a small set of genes that has ensured not only its own survival but also the survival of men. Moreover, the vast majority appear to have little if any role in sex determination or sperm production. Taken together, these remarkable findings suggest that these Y-linked genes may actually be contributing to differences in disease susceptibility and severity observed between men and women.
National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Matt Fearer
fearer@wi.mit.edu
617-452-4630
Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Hearing quality restored with bionic ear technology used for gene therapy
Researchers at UNSW Australia have for the first time used electrical pulses delivered from a cochlear implant to deliver gene therapy, thereby successfully regrowing auditory nerves.
Australian Research Council

Contact: Susi Hamilton
susi.hamilton@unsw.edu.au
61-422-934-024
University of New South Wales

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual Meeting
Study examines risk of early death for people with mild cognitive impairment
One of the first studies to look at a relationship between death and the two types of mild cognitive impairment, or problems with memory and thinking abilities, suggests that people who have thinking problems but their memory is still intact might have a higher death rate in a period of six years compared to those who have no thinking or memory problems.

Contact: Rachel Seroka
rseroka@aan.com
612-928-6129
American Academy of Neurology

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Neurology
People with more education may recover better from traumatic brain injury
People with more years of education may be better able to recover from a traumatic brain injury, according to a study published in the April 23, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Contact: Rachel Seroka
rseroka@aan.com
612-928-6129
American Academy of Neurology

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual Meeting
People with mild cognitive impairment may die at higher rate than people without condition
Mayo Clinic research studying the relationship between death and the two types of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) suggests that people who have these conditions die at a higher rate than people without MCI. The research was released today and will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, April 26-May 3, 2014.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, Rochester Epidemiology Project

Contact: Duska Anastasijevic
newsbureau@mayo.edu
507-284-5005
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Atorvastatin protects against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury
In addition to its lipid-lowering effect, statins exert anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects as well.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Scientific Reports
Physicist demonstrates dictionary definition was dodgy
QUT senior lecturer in physics, Dr. Stephen Hughes, sparked controversy over how a humble siphon worked when he noticed an incorrect definition in the prestigious Oxford English Dictionary. In 2010, eagle-eyed Dr. Hughes spotted the mistake, which went unnoticed for 99 years, which incorrectly described atmospheric pressure, rather than gravity, as the operating force in a siphon.

Contact: Rob Kidd
rj.kidd@qut.edu.au
07-313-81841
Queensland University of Technology

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Acupuncture at Waiguan improves activation of functional brain areas of stroke patients
Both acupuncture at Waiguan and sham acupuncture can activate/deactivate several brain regions in patients with ischemic stroke.

Contact: MengZhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
American Journal of Human Biology
Remote surveillance may increase chance of survival for 'uncontacted' Brazilian tribes
Lowland South America, including the Amazon Basin, harbors most of the last indigenous societies that have limited contact with the outside world. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have used satellite images to assess the demographic health of one particular village of isolated people on the border between Brazil and Peru. Remote surveillance is the only method to safely track uncontacted indigenous societies and may offer information that can improve their chances for long-term survival.
National Geographic Society

Contact: Jeff Sossamon
sossamonj@missouri.edu
573-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Community Development
Uniting community development efforts could benefit members of underserved communities
Although many organizations address poverty, they often serve similar demographics and may compete for clients and resources. Recently, University of Missouri researchers studied Cooperative Extension's efforts to link community development organizations and concluded Extension is the hub that can improve resource access for members of underserved communities.

Contact: Jesslyn Chew
ChewJ@missouri.edu
573-882-8353
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
PLOS ONE
Best practices in communication for the animal world
Effective communication is not just about the signaler, according to the study, the receiver also needs to assess the signaler efficiently. For instance, one of the most effective strategies from the perspective of female birds is assessing groups of males called leks, where females can assess multiple males in a short period of time.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Annette Gallagher
a.gallagher1@umiami.edu
305-284-1121
University of Miami

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Eating Behaviors
Biting vs. chewing
There's a new secret to get your child to behave at the dinner table -- cut up their food! This new Cornell study found that when 6- to 10-year-old children ate food that they had to bite with their front teeth, chicken on the bone, they were rowdier than when the food had been cut into bite-sized pieces.

Contact: Sandra Cuellar
foodandbrandlab@cornell.edu
607-254-4960
Cornell Food & Brand Lab

Showing releases 176-200 out of 348.

<< < 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 > >>