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Showing releases 176-200 out of 371.

<< < 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 > >>

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Important element in the fight against sleeping sickness found
Researchers from Aarhus have now uncovered how parasites that cause the deadly sleeping sickness in Africa absorb an important nutrient from the human blood stream. The result may help the development of more effective drugs to fight the disease.

Contact: Christian Brix Folsted Andersen
cbfa@biomed.au.dk
45-87-15-43-56
Aarhus University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Cell Research
Discovery by NUS researchers contributes towards future treatment of multiple sclerosis
A multi-disciplinary research team from the National University of Singapore has made a breakthrough discovery of a new type of immune cells that may help in the development of a future treatment for multiple sclerosis.

Contact: Kimberley Wang
kimberley.wang@nus.edu.sg
National University of Singapore

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
ESMO Symposium on Immuno-Oncology 2014 -Geneva, 21-22 November
Annals of Oncology
High-dose interleukin-2 effective in mRCC pre-treated with VEGF-targeted therapies
High-dose interleukin-2 can be effective in selected metastatic renal cell cancer patients pre-treated with VEGF-targeted agents, reveals research presented at the ESMO Symposium on Immuno-Oncology in Geneva, Switzerland.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Journal of Cell Biology
Has a possible new lead been found in the fight against neurodegenerative diseases?
Good communication between brain cells is vital for optimal health. Mutations in the TBC1D24 gene inhibit this process, thereby causing neurodegeneration and epilepsy. Fruit flies with a defect in Skywalker, the fruit fly variant of TBC1D24, are being used as a model for neurodegeneration. Researchers from VIB and KU Leuven have succeeded in completely suppressing neurodegeneration in such fruit flies, by partially inhibiting the breakdown of 'defective' proteins in brain cells.

Contact: Sooike Stoops
info@vib.be
32-924-46611
VIB (the Flanders Institute for Biotechnology)

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Journal of Clinical Microbiology
New method to determine antibiotic resistance fast
Scientists from Uppsala University, the Science for Life Laboratory in Stockholm and Uppsala University Hospital have developed a new method of rapidly identifying which bacteria are causing an infection and determining whether they are resistant or sensitive to antibiotics. The findings are now being published in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology.

Contact: Dan Andersson
Dan.Andersson@imbim.uu.se
46-070-167-9077
Uppsala University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Toxin targets discovered
Research that provides a new understanding of how bacterial toxins target human cells is set to have major implications for the development of novel drugs and treatment strategies.

Contact: Skye Small
skye.small@griffith.edu.au
047-849-4898
Griffith University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Materials Research Society Conference
An inside job: UC-designed nanoparticles infiltrate, kill cancer cells from within
UC nanoparticle designs target and treat early stage cancer cells by killing those cells with heat, delivered from inside the cell itself. Normal cells are thus left unaffected by the treatment regimen.
National Science Foundation

Contact: M.B. Reilly
reillymb@ucmail.uc.edu
513-556-1824
University of Cincinnati

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
JAX research team identifies new mechanism for misfolded proteins in heart disease
A Jackson Laboratory research team has found that the misfolded proteins implicated in several cardiac diseases could be the result not of a mutated gene, but of mistranslations during the 'editing' process of protein synthesis.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, aTyr Pharma Inc., National Foundation for Cancer Research, American Health Assistance Foundation, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Joyce Peterson
joyce.peterson@jax.org
207-288-6058
Jackson Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
JAMA Neurology
Football players found to have brain damage from mild 'unreported' concussions
According to Dr. Alon Friedman, from the Ben-Gurion University Brain Imaging Research Center and discoverer of the new diagnostic, 'until now, there wasn't a diagnostic capability to identify mild brain injury early after the trauma. In the NFL, other professional sports and especially school sports, concern has grown about the long-term neuropsychiatric consequences of repeated mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) and specifically sports-related concussive and sub-concussive head impacts.'

Contact: Andrew Lavin
andrewlavin@alavin.com
516-353-2505
American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution
Scientists solve reptile mysteries with landmark study on the evolution of turtles
A team of scientists, including researchers from the California Academy of Sciences, has reconstructed a detailed 'tree of life' for turtles. Next generation sequencing technologies in Academy labs have generated unprecedented amounts of genetic information for a thrilling new look at turtles' evolutionary history. Authors place turtles in the newly named group 'Archelosauria' with their closest relatives: birds, crocodiles, and dinosaurs.

Contact: Haley Bowling
hbowling@calacademy.org
415-379-5123
California Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
ACS Nano
ASU, IBM move ultrafast, low-cost DNA sequencing technology a step closer to reality
A team of scientists from Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute and IBM's T.J. Watson Research Center have developed a prototype DNA reader that could make whole genome profiling an everyday practice in medicine. "Our goal is to put cheap, simple and powerful DNA and protein diagnostic devices into every single doctor's office," said Stuart Lindsay, an ASU physics professor and director of Biodesign's Center for Single Molecule Biophysics. Such technology could help usher in the age of personalized medicine.
Roche, NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Contact: Joe Caspermeyer
joseph.caspermeyer@asu.edu
480-727-0369
Arizona State University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Wireless electronic implants stop staph, then dissolve
For the first time, researchers have demonstrated a resorbable electronic implant that eliminated bacterial infection in mice by delivering heat to infected tissue when triggered by a remote wireless signal. The silk and magnesium devices then harmlessly dissolved. This is an important step forward for future development of on-demand medical devices that can be turned on remotely to perform a therapeutic function, such as managing post-surgical infection, and then degrade in the body.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kim Thurler
kim.thurler@tufts.edu
617-627-3175
Tufts University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Quaternary Science Reviews
New volume documents the science at the legendary snowmastodon fossil site in Colorado
Four years ago, a bulldozer turned over some bones at Ziegler Reservoir near Snowmass Village, Colorado. Scientists from the Denver Museum of Nature & Science were called to the scene and confirmed the bones were those of a Columbian mammoth, setting off a frenzy of excavation, scientific analysis, and international media attention. This dramatic and unexpected discovery culminates this month with the publication of the Snowmastodon Project Science Volume in the international journal Quaternary Research.

Contact: Maura O'Neal
maura.oneal@dmns.org
303-370-6407
Denver Museum of Nature & Science

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Journal of Experimental Medicine
Protein that rouses the brain from sleep may be target for Alzheimer's prevention
A protein that stimulates the brain to awaken from sleep may be a target for preventing Alzheimer's disease, a study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests.

Contact: Michael C. Purdy
purdym@wustl.edu
314-286-0122
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature
Animals steal defenses from bacteria
Bacteria compete for resources in the environment by injecting deadly toxins into their rivals. Researcher have now discovered that many animals steal toxins from bacteria to fight unwanted microbes growing on them. Genes for these toxins have jumped from bacterial to animals. These genes are now permanently incorporated into the genomes of these animals. Deer ticks, which can carry Lyme disease, are one of the many diverse organisms in which toxin gene transfers from bacteria to animal has occurred.
National Institutes of Health, Defense Threat Reduction Agency,Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Leila Gray
leilag@uw.edu
206-685-0381
University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
JAMA Internal Medicine
Basic vs. advanced life support outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
Patients who had cardiac arrest at home or elsewhere outside of a hospital had greater survival to hospital discharge and to 90 days beyond if they received basic life support vs. advanced life support from ambulance personnel, according to a report published online by JAMA Internal Medicine.

Contact: Angela Alberti
Angela_Alberti@hms.harvard.edu
617-432-3038
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
JAMA Internal Medicine
Delaying ART in patients with HIV reduces likelihood of restoring CD4 counts
A larger percentage of patients with human immunodeficiency virus achieved normalization of CD4+ T-cell counts when they started antiretroviral therapy within 12 months of the estimated dates of seroconversion rather than later, according to a report published online by JAMA Internal Medicine.

Contact: Will Sansom
SANSOM@uthscsa.edu
210-567-2579
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Psychological Science
The sound of status: People know high-power voices when they hear them
Being in a position of power can fundamentally change the way you speak, altering basic acoustic properties of the voice, and other people are able to pick up on these vocal cues to know who is really in charge, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
Dispute Resolution Research Center at Northwestern University

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Medicine
Masking HIV target cells prevents viral transmission in animal model
Cloaking immune cells with antibodies that block T cell trafficking to the gut can substantially reduce the risk of viral transmission in a non-human primate model of HIV infection, scientists report.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Quinn Eastman
qeastma@emory.edu
404-727-7829
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
eLife
Mutant protein takes babies' breath away
Researchers had never shown exactly how cells in the brain stem detect carbon dioxide and regulate breathing in humans. After taking a mutation from a two-month-old baby and expressing it in human astrocytes, they did exactly that -- and the research may lead to an early warning system to save premature infants with breathing trouble.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kim Krieger
kim.krieger@uconn.edu
860-486-0361
University of Connecticut

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Neuroscience
Pain in a dish
After more than six years of intensive effort, and repeated failures that made the quest at times seem futile, Harvard Stem Cell Institute researchers at Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard's Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology have successfully converted mouse and human skin cells into pain sensing neurons that respond to a number of stimuli that cause acute and inflammatory pain.
Glaxo Smith Kline

Contact: B. D. Colen
bd_colen@harvard.edu
617-413-1224
Harvard University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Fisheries
Endangered Idaho salmon regaining fitness advantage
Endangered Snake River sockeye salmon are regaining the fitness of their wild ancestors, with naturally spawned juvenile sockeye returning from the ocean at a much higher rate than others from hatcheries, a new analysis has found. Biologists believe the increased return rate is high enough for the species to eventually sustain itself in the wild again.

Contact: Michael Milstein
michael.milstein@noaa.gov
503-231-6268
NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Biotechnology
New device could make large biological circuits practical
An innovation from MIT could allow many biological components to be connected to produce predictable effects.
Eni-MIT Energy Research Fellowship, National Science Foundation, US Army Research Office, US Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Medicine
Excessive contact between cellular organelles disrupts metabolism in obesity
Researchers at Harvard School of Public Health have found a novel mechanism causing type 2 diabetes that could be targeted to prevent or treat the disease. The research highlights a previously unrecognized molecular pathway that contributes to the malfunction of liver cells in obesity, leading to insulin resistance and diabetes.
National Institutes of Health, Pew Charitable Trusts, Alfred Benzon Foundation

Contact: Marge Dwyer
mhdwyer@hsph.harvard.edu
617-432-8416
Harvard School of Public Health

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Gastroenterology
Healthy gut microbiota can prevent metabolic syndrome, researchers say
Promoting healthy gut microbiota, the bacteria that live in the intestine, can help treat or prevent metabolic syndrome, a combination of risk factors that increases a person's risk for heart disease, diabetes and stroke, according to researchers at Georgia State University and Cornell University. Their findings are published in the journal Gastroenterology.
National Institutes of Health, Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America

Contact: LaTina Emerson
lemerson1@gsu.edu
404-413-1353
Georgia State University

Showing releases 176-200 out of 371.

<< < 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 > >>